editor

Uncategorized

killer

Shocking new photos reveal how British sailor opened escape hatches and SMASHED giant holes in the hull of his yacht to drown his newlywed wife on their honeymoon and inherit her estate. Read on....

Read On
Uncategorized

butt hurt

It seems that Tony Buckingham, owner of “The Beast” Ngoni, has no love for racing dinghies in his exclusion zone. In July a 420 sailing out of Courageous Sailing Center for Youth, the well-known and well-regarded nonprofit sailing center in Boston, Massachusetts, allegedly scratched Buckingham’s $50 million sailing yacht, and it looks like the oil executive is trying to get even. Courageous has filed a limitation of liability action in federal court, using an obscure 1851 law to limit their liability for the allision to the value of the 420, estimated at $1,000. If successful, then despite all the lawyers’ fees in the world, Courageous would not have to pay more than $1,000 to repair the damages Ngoni allegedly suffered. The case is currently pending before the United States District Court for the District of Massachusetts (Case No. 1:19-CV-10137-DPW). links to other info and the complaint may be found at: http://www.boatinglaw.com/maritimearticles/courageous420limitation.html Click here to comment.  ...

Read On
Uncategorized

finnagain

Part II of our Glitter and Gold article... Q&A We met blasting around the Sakonnet River on shortboard windsurfers. It doesn’t surprise me that you’re a total speed nut in your cruising, too. What led to the creation of FINN? Let me just say upfront that speed is safety. Speed means you can pick weather windows, outrun systems, and get away from bad stuff. It also means you can go farther and explore more. I got into multihulls when I bought a Ketterman Tri-Foiler in the early 1990s. It was stupid fast and a lot of fun. I’ve had three multihulls. The first was a Chris White Atlantic 42 Light Speed in the 1990s. It had daggerboards and I was figuring it out. I spent winters in the Caribbean. It was a ton of fun. I really enjoyed the forward cockpit and being out there with the wind in my face. I lived across the water from Peter Johnstone. I wanted to build a larger cat and he wanted a large monohull to sail around the world. He was sailing a 60-foot monohull that wasn’t faster than my 42-foot cat. Pete Melvin came out to work with us and Johnstone and I wound up splitting the cost of the molds and we each did our own boat in 2001. It was really well built and done right. I spent the next years sailing between Roque Island and Grenada and lived aboard homeschooling our son for a winter. I came away with two impressions after sailing Safari: Catamarans are like driving a tennis court. And, with all these people onboard with four cabins, I wound up being the moderator of the sandbox. One group would want to go for a tour on land, others windsurfing and I’d end up being nothing...

Read On
Uncategorized

numbers

We love this from the forums... Racing rules of sailing state that, "The national letters and sail number shall be displayed on both sides of a headsail whose clew can extend behind the mast 30% or more of the mainsail foot length." My question is, why are there rules that requires sail numbers on headsails only larger than 130%?  The only reason I can come up with, is a larger sail may conceal the sail numbers from another boat looking at the leeward side, but I reviewed lots of photos and even boats with 170% jibs typically don't overlap in the area the main sail number are located based on the acute angle of the head of the headsail. I ask because, given the fact that some people will even paint the bow of their boat white to match the fleet at a starting line so they are no more obvious to pick out of the line than another boat, and given many new/modern are configured with 100% jibs, doesn't this rule, in a mixed fleet of non-OD boats, give some advantage at a starting line, to boats that don't have jibs larger than 130% as a standard configuration and therefore don;t have sail number on their headsail?    Heck boats like J80, J70s and even some J99s with huge AKites don't even have sail numbers on their spinnakers.  Why is that? And yes, we mostly race OD, so please skip the PHRF hack and PHRF sucks; race one design comments. Jump in the thread....

Read On
Uncategorized

freak out

A team of researchers based at the Universities of Oxford and Edinburgh have recreated the famous Draupner rogue (freak) wave for the first time. The wave was measured in the North Sea on January 1, 1995 and was one of the first confirmed observations of a rogue wave in the ocean. Rogue waves are unexpectedly large in comparison to surrounding waves. They are difficult to predict, often appearing suddenly without warning. The wave was measured from the Draupner Oil Platform during a sea state with significant wave height of approximately 12 meters (39 feet), a freak wave with a maximum wave height of 25.6 meters (84 feet) occurred. Prior to the measurement, made by a downwards-pointing laser sensor, no instrument-recorded evidence for rogue waves existed. The team of researchers recreated the wave using two smaller wave groups and varying the crossing angle – the angle at which the two groups travel. It was only possible to reproduce the freak wave when the crossing angle between the two groups was approximately 120 degrees. When waves are not crossing, wave breaking limits the height that a wave can achieve. However, when waves cross at large angles, wave breaking behavior changes and no longer limits the height a wave can achieve in the same manner. The research was led by Dr. Mark McAllister and Professor Ton van den Bremer at the University of Oxford, in collaboration with Dr. Sam Draycott at the University of Edinburgh. The project builds upon work previously carried out at the University of Oxford by Professors Thomas Adcock and Paul Taylor. Props to Marex....

Read On
Uncategorized

icebreaker hits iceberg, iceberg wins

The Chinese icebreaker Xue Long suffered minor damage on Saturday after striking an iceberg, according to China's Ministry of Natural Resources. The collision occurred at 69.6 S 94.0 W, off the coast of the Antarctic Peninsula. The Xue Long was making three knots in foggy conditions at the time of the encounter. Images broadcast by state television showed a small mountain of ice and snow on the Xue Long's deck forward, and the crew used picks, axes, firehoses and deck cranes to break the debris free and put it over the side. Video from the scene showed damage to the Xue Long's foremast, railings and other fixtures on her bow, but no injuries or mechanical casualties were reported. Read on....

Read On
Uncategorized

a place called vertigo

It's not often that you get to race in the exact conditions a boat was designed for but Saturday at the VX One Midwinter Championship provided exactly that. 26 boats, consistent breeze in the low 20s, warm water, great people and tons of fun. Video from the Blue Lobster Racing youth squad of Katy Hannan, Nick Woviotis and Ian Maccini....

Read On
Uncategorized

almost all the stars

With more than 450 delegates from all over the world gathering in Lorient, France, for two days of conferences, presentations and debates, the Yacht Racing Forum has confirmed that it is indeed the premier business-to-business platform for the sport of sailing. Sailing history oozes out of Lorient, where Eric Tabarly is feted as a hero of French sailing, alongside living legends such as Franck Cammas, Michel Desjoyeaux, Loick Peyron and Alain Gautier, many of whom were present at the Yacht Racing Forum. The conference brought together no less than 450 delegates, while the exhibition space included around 20 stands representing the most dynamic brands from around the world that are involved in competitive sailing. Three state-of-the-art yachts were also on display: the new Figaro Bénéteau 3, the 26ft one-design foiling catamaran Easy to Fly and the Volvo Ocean 65 AkzoNobel. Peyron shared his passion for cruising and racing at the Design and Technology Symposium on day one of the Forum. ‘When I’m racing, I’m dreaming about cruising. When I’m cruising, I don’t like to be inefficient,’ he explained. ‘That’s why many of our innovations from racing are useful for cruising.’ Read on....

Read On
Uncategorized

the dutch are coming

Today, under the leadership of Simeon Tienpont, the initiator of Team The Netherlands, the symbolic opening of his Team Base took place in the Topsportcentrum Scheveningen. This in preparation for a Dutch participation in the 36th America's Cup. The America's Cup is now 167 years old and is the first time that the Netherlands participates. Simeon Tienpont is the first to take the floor and tells us that the timing is perfect for a Dutch project in the America's Cup. Technical knowledge and various lines of research become the building blocks for this syndicate. The construction of the AC75 sailboat and the process of the team during the run-up to the World Series will generate a huge amount of information that is also of high social value. It is a great opportunity for BV Nederland. Read on thanks to clubracer....

Read On
1 482 483 484 492
Page 483 of 492