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dago bay day

The A4 out today with new and old friends. A fun day, if not quite a winning day (although we did win one race so I guess that is a winning day) . Much love to Lia Ditton, Steph Clancey, Rodrigo Doll, Justin Edelmann, Sean Kelley and Pete Woodworth. I thank you for everything . Photo thanks to Dennis St. Onge....

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dig it

Things haven't been quite right in the coastal town of Carnarvon since the main waterway became choked up with silt about two years ago. A sandbar formed across the entrance to the waterway that connects the boating community to the ocean. Instantly the yacht club marina became landlocked, and a flash $3-million community boat ramp built with Royalties for Regions funding was inaccessible. Carnarvon Yacht Club general manager Jim Williams said the impact on the town, and tourism, had been "terrible". "Visiting yachts and people on trailer boats haven't been able to get to the town, to say nothing of locals who are denied their enjoyment of the ocean because of this," Mr Williams said. "It's really affected the social life of the club because usually we'd have visiting yachties, who would be here and contributing to the life of the club. "And it has had a dramatic impact on the town because we haven't got people reprovisioning here, we haven't got people with the trailer boats coming to spend money in town, to stay in accommodation and that's had a big impact overall." Read on....

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real life

A staggering story from Jen Edney.... 6:30 am I walk out into the kitchen to start a pot of coffee and can sense something is not right. The energy in the room felt dark and deep. My friends had been up all night talking, one looked at me through eyes full of despair in trying to help and the other looked at me through checked-out eyes and asked, “How do you do it everyday?” It was a heavy question and I felt the depth of the importance of what I would say next: “Faith, Forgiveness, Gratitude and Guardian Angels.” This week is usually a reflective one for me every year and this year I was asked to dig much deeper and share a part of my story that I haven’t shared very much. Feb 14 is a day that I was given a second chance, it is a day I survived. The visions always come back every year and the feelings even stronger. I wake up in the darkness. I am in the water, helpless, I can’t move my body. A man picks me up from under my shoulders setting me on the boat, darkness surrounds me as he silently walks away. I wake up the next morning where I should be, my clothes are wet and I can hardly walk my body hurts so bad. My head hurts, I reach up to touch it and find two bumps on the back of my head. I go to the bathroom and notice huge bruises on my inner thigh. I can hardly lift my leg and my whole body feels strange. February 14th, while many are focused on what flowers they are going to get or planning dates with their loved ones, this is the vision that plays over in my...

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no magic

No trickery in this win! The Volvo 70 "Wizard", new to the brothers Askew, absolutely crushed the Caribbean 600. The boat looks awesome, the team was rock solid and that's how ya do it. See how easy that is? Check it out....

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sea sick

Are you bored with Anderson Cooper 360? Here comes Marc Jacobi360! (start sequence, make sure to watch the various angles, this is not a regular youtube video). (Marc is the world champion in the RS Aero 9, and also the guy promoting the class in N.A.)...

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tru

One of the primary goals of junior sailing programs should be retaining kids long enough for them to develop a passion for the sport and a personal desire to continue. Far too often, however, before that happens kids are asked to spend too much time (years) in boats that do not align with their version of fun and pressure to “succeed” comes much too soon. The current junior sailing recipe is driving kids out and resulting in an abysmal retention rate. The most common single-handed entry path into the sport, along with a continual decrease in the age when formal sailing classes start (from 8 years old to the now common 6), results in too many young kids having scary early experiences and too many years in the same type of boat. Pressure to showcase a structured, serious program that can produce top quality sailors cuts into the fun factor. “Racing pressure” sends kids that aren’t ready, to regattas too soon and to events that are too big; kids that show “potential to be good” are sent into the sport headfirst at the speed of light, and year-round. Not everyone drops out from these factors, and some will become amazing Optimist sailors and future Olympic and world champions, but meanwhile we’re losing too many kids before they have a chance to gain enough basic skills and have enough fun in boats to fall in love with all that sailing offers. Read on, thanks to WindCheck...

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airgun?

A group of conservation organizations have asked a federal judge to block the start of seismic airgun activities for offshore drilling in the Atlantic Ocean until the case can be fully heard in court. The motion for a preliminary injunction filed in federal court in Charleston contends that the Trump administration’s approval for five companies seismic surveys violates the Marine Mammal Protection Act, the Endangered Species Act and the National Environmental Policy Act. Separately, 16 South Carolina coastal communities and the South Carolina Small Business Chamber of Commerce also filed a lawsuit to prevent seismic activity. That lawsuit has been merged with the one from the conservation groups. The filing asserts that: Read on.  ...

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big pimpin’

We love their approach... We are a fully volunteer run class association (www.young88.org.nz) working hard to get the nationals entry numbers back up to the 20s where they were in the sailing heydays of the 80's and 90's. Currently we have 15 and any exposure is going to help. SA would be awesome. Check some of the names on the roll of honour at this page. Jim Young is an iconic Kiwi Designer into ULDB boats when everyone else was sailing leadmines . Camp Freddy went to Cowes in the mid 90s and stunned onlookers and the scoreboard.Ref Here is a video interview I did for the Y88 West Island (aus) Champs Heavily edited but still long.. that man can talk! Jim is now in his 90's and his health is not so flash. He always comes to prize giving and is a real character. It would be great if we can show him that his most popular boat (150 were built and still sailing in Aus and NZ) is in great shape and still growing.. Apologies that was going to be a short note! Regards Anarchist Mike...

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