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chipping in

We didn't know UK was even in business. They make those tape drive sails, don't they? Anyway, here's something good from them... While we wait for the COVID-19 virus to ease, everyone here at UK|NY is doing our part. We have started manufacturing PPEs (Personal Protective Equipment) specifically Isolation Gowns and Face Shields. We will be delivering batches of each to White Plains Hospital and Elmhurst Hospital Center in Queens....

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what’s your club doing?

Royal Melbourne Yacht Squadron has closed its doors, suspended all racing and is providing no further tangible services to its members. That’s fully understandable. However in a letter sent out yesterday they are still planning to charge full membership fees. I understand that they will have certain fixed costs that they need to cover but at a time when everyone else is taking a big financial hit, this attitude feels a bit like profiteering? I wonder what other Yacht Clubs around the world are doing? - Anarchist Mark. Jump in the thread in Corona Anarchy....

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looking forward

It is a period of uncertainty for the sailing world with canceled and postponed events, yacht clubs closing, and people not being able to sail. It’s tough times, and we wish a speedy recovery for our friends in those areas most affected. Having an event to look forward to helps us get through these difficult times, and we are pleased to announce the 2021 M32 World Championship. Read on....

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dream on

The third edition of the DRHEAM-CUP, from 18 to 27 July, starting in Cherbourg-en-Cotentin and finishing in La Trinité-sur-Mer, is continuing to open to more competitors, as the OPEN DE FRANCE DE COURSE AU LARGE -labelled race will welcome a Figaro Bénéteau 3 fleet. An opportunity for the solo sailing experts to warm up on the DRHEAM-CUP 400 course, one month before the start of the Solitaire du Figaro. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, many organisers are having to postpone or cancel races, including the Solo Maître CoQ, the Solo Guy Cotten and the Transat AG2R, the last three races in the Figaro Bénéteau class season. Drheam Promotion, organiser of the DRHEAM-CUP, has stated that they intend to welcome the Figaro Bénéteau 3 fleet this year. Read on....

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poles apart

The current kerfuffle over headsail outrigger spars reminds us of how obsessed some people in our sport have become with squeezing every last fraction of a knot out of the rules, and how safety issues can often go to the back of the queue during the headlong hunt for trophies. There is nothing new in pushing spars to the extreme limits of their capacity to control the force of wind on sails. The early Australian racing skiffs (above) had two-part gunter rigs, largely because a single wooden spar was unlikely to withstand the pull of the massive clouds of sail their crews set.  The spinnaker poles were so long they were carried in three sections and then slotted together before the hoist. Gybing was so difficult the crews simply dropped the forestay, swung the pole through and then restored the forestay on the new tack. Not for the faint-hearted! But even the best-made wooden spars could fail in unexpected ways. I am old enough to have done my first Sydney-Hobart race in a yacht whose sails were set on timber. Running hard under spinnaker in a fair-sized swell we buried the bow as a gust drove us down into the back of the wave ahead. The boat stopped but the rig kept going.  Unable to cope with this sudden extra load the spinnaker pole snapped into three pieces, one of which flew back over the coach-house and nearly decapitated two of us in the cockpit. The shock of that near-death experience has never left me. Which brings us to outriggers (or “reaching struts” as they are known Down Under).  To my mind a key issue seems to have been forgotten in the debate over their legality, or how they should be rated and the measurement of the special sails they...

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the smackdown downunder

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CUvqIi9l-mk&feature=emb_title Another back in the day post from SA, this one December of 2015 We’re still not sure if Jim Clark’s monster-maxi logo is a Comanche or Keith Richards, but with her never-say-die ingenuity overcoming major appendage damage, Kenny Read and the big indian’s crew made mincemeat of the previously all-conquering Wild Oats XI. This despite a decade of design and redesign from the Oatley’s skinny recordholder specifically for this race – and only this race – and we remain confused and slightly shocked that the all-star crew of they Sydney boat was defeated by something as pedestrian as the failure of her $200,000 3DI mainsail.  Was it a brand new sail, and if not, why wasn’t it?  Was it poor crew work?  A ‘white squall’? We’d tell you more, but there ain’t much – and of course the best place in the world for all the news is right here on our forums.  Sailor Girl’s live feed from Constitution Dock ain’t bad either – here’s her interview with Ken Read and the rest of the Comanche crew earlier this morning.  Thanks entirely to Nic, we know Comanche’s victory was far from easy even with the silver arrow crawling home with her tail between her legs. Ken explained that Comanche broke her board near the hull, hanging on the uphaul and banging around threatening the hull.  They cut the board free, but it collected the rudder on its way back, and after the shunt, the steering system was broken with the rudder facing backward.  Toolboxes came out, the steering was repaired, and they decided it was safe to continue.  For the rest of the story, hit Nic’s link above. Tags:comanchehobartken readSydney-Hobartvideo...

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industry update

How the world's boat companies are dealing with this current coronavirus global situation... Members of the International Council of Marine Industry Associations (ICOMIA) provided updates on the impact of the coronavirus outbreak on the boating industry in their respective countries via a webshare service ICOMIA hosted for its members today, drawing 52 participants. IBI will be providing more ICOMIA updates from other countries in coming days Read on....

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broke but not broken

An accidental dismasting can quickly degenerate into a sinking if it is not well managed, or if bad luck gets involved. Better to have thought about it before so as not to find yourself lacking in situation. Here is how this scenario can unfold. Read on....

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