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good story brah

So this Code 0 thing. When I was working as a sailmaker for Dee Smith, (poor bastard. - ed) I was very involved in a Wilderness 30 which I was about to race to Hawaii in the 1982 SF to Kauai race. I had done the previous one in 1980 on another Wilderness 30 and felt we could do a little Turbocharging. We moved the spinnakers up to the masthead about 5' taller. Made the spinnaker poles 20% longer. We decided to build a free flying wire luff masthead Jib. It was very large out of the early 2.6 oz. taffeta/mylar. We called it our "Jumbo Jib". It was amazing! We could sail pretty close to the wind in light air at wind speed or greater. For handicap reasons we claimed our masthead as our "I" measurement and our 20% longer pole as our"J" measurement as back then there was no provision for such a sail. We used that sail for many years in coastal Nor Cal to So Cal ocean races with unreal success. OK that's my Code 0 story. - Ironically, here is a pic of us with a symmetrical from back in the day.  - Dave Hodges, (NoCal guru - ed)...

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not so great

“The fine weather held as she made her way down the Irish coast. Off the Fastnet, to the joy of her passengers, she overhauled a Black Ball packet, the Underwriter, and left her plunging unhappily into a head sea. She forged ahead with magnificent unconcern. ‘Wonderful!’ said her passengers, and declared that the day of discomfort at sea had passed. But noon saw the wind veer to the north, and before long the Great Eastern was showing them what she could do in a heavy beam sea. She could, it appeared, hang on the roll, and that made death seem all too close. Many thought she would turn right over, and behaved as people do when unused to contemplating eternity before their allotted span. Finally, the sea caught hold of her, tore off one of her paddle wheels and swept away several boats, and left her wallowing in the trough – unmanageable. Her rudder stock had gone.” R. Benstead–The Ill-Fated Great Eastern (1936) (At the time of her launch in 1858 the SS Great Eastern was by far the largest ship ever built. Designed by civil engineer Isambard Kingdom Brunel and constructed in iron, her combination of sail and steam-powered paddle wheels was never a success. She ended her days as a floating music hall and was broken up in 1889.)...

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short stuff

If you have been pining for the racecourse as you watch the events calendar evaporate, the answer to getting back out on the water and possibly even racing may be closer than you think. And it’s your B&G autopilot that could not only hold the key, but provide a legal advantage that few are exploiting. Covid-19 may have forced us to look at our sport in a different way, at least for the time being, but the shutdown has provided an opportunity to capitalise on a big change in offshore racing while providing an incentive to get back on the racecourse and try shorthanded sailing. Just a few months ago, a full crew on the weather rail looked completely normal. Now it is unacceptable under the current social distancing rules, unless of course you are all from the same household. For most crews, adhering to the current rules with crew spaced 2m apart is clearly not practical. Neither is the prospect of reducing the crew of say a 40-footer from eight to say just three. Or is it?...

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code zero info

Where does this Code 0 come from? It seems that this terminology was invented during the Whitbread 1998-99 to define a flying sail to be used upwind. There were already Codes 1, 2,3… to navigate from full to close reach. The term Code 0 was imposed to define this sail capable of sailing at tighter angles than any other flying sails. During the last two decades, the evolution of materials and designs has made it possible to create very specialized sails for light winds. Read on....

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bye bye hammo

Major sailing events around the world continue to succumb to the Coronavirus. The latest victim is Australia’s favourite “get away from it all” outing for offshore yachts, the Hamilton Island Race Week. The cancellation of the 37-year-old event was announced last night. Hamilton Island is a resort in the Whitsunday group in North Queensland. The island is owned by the Oatley family, owners of the famous Wild Oats ocean racers. A resurgence in COVID-19, mainly in the Southern cities of Australia, prompted the Queensland state government yesterday to include Sydney as a virus “hot spot”. That means that travel between Sydney and Queensland is now severely restricted until further notice. The Hamilton Island Race management issued a brief statement explaining their decision:   “The Queensland Government has recently declared numerous COVID-19 hotspots and yesterday announced the inclusion of Greater Sydney. In light of this announcement and despite our best intentions to host the event, our Race Management team who are so vital to the smooth and fair conduct of the sailing, are now unable to travel. As such, we have made the tough decision to cancel Hamilton Island Race Week 2020.” Entrants Full will be offered full refunds of their entry fees.  Meanwhile, there is now speculation that the first major offshore event of the season – the Sydney-Gold Coast Race – may also be in jeopardy. Its start, scheduled for October 3, was already delayed by two months because of COVID.  The Gold Coast race is largely a “feeder” for the Hamilton Island event with many of the competitors continuing North to the Whitsundays after the finish at Southport.  – anarchist David...

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you do

“Sailing, boating or yachting, call it what you will, is neither a sport nor a hobby. It is a religion so fanatical and demanding that those who partake of its mysteries have little time for lesser beings who merely stare longingly from jetty or beach. There is no halfway status in between. You either do or you do not. There are of course many who feel their way from earth to water, but known results are more alarming than encouraging. You can crew for a friend who already owns a boat. This can be entertaining. It can also be quite disastrous to both boat and friendship. Even divorce is not unknown at the end of such a venture.” Douglas Reeman – The Best of Boat Worlds (1968) (Reeman was an RN midshipman at age 16 and saw widespread service during WWII in destroyers and motor torpedo boats. He was badly injured during the D-Day landing. As an author of 68 maritime-themed novels he used the pseudonym ‘Alexander Kent’ as well as his own name. He also taught navigation.)...

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back at it again

Following the release of the latest RYA Guidance on sailing and racing published under the UK Government Return to Team Sports Framework, the Royal Southern YC has expanded the crew eligibility criteria for the August Charity Cup to include racing with a full crew. IRC Rated boats are invited to enter with a full IRC crew number IRC Doublehanded crews VPRS Handicap boats are invited to enter with a full crew number J/70s are invited to enter with a full crew under class rules XODs are invited to enter with a full crew under class rules Entries are also invited from sportsboat or dayboat classes where 4 or more boats wish to take part in this event. All owners and crew will be required to comply with regulations and guidance on Covid 19 from the Government, Harbourmasters and the RYA. All competitors are requested to read the latest RYA guidance document and to follow all of the recommendations. A revised Notice of Race is available on the Royal Southern YC website. Entry options include racing for the weekend 8th & 9th August and or for the full four days 8th to 11th August. Title inspiration thanks to Yella Beezy, Quavo, & Gucci Mane...

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the wrong way completely

The sharp rise in global Covid-19 cases has forced Wicklow Sailing Club to cancel this year’s SSE Renewables Round Ireland Race, due to start on Saturday 22nd August. The next staging of the 704-nautical mile race will now take place in June 2022. As early as March of this year, the 21st edition of the race was headed for a record turnout in excess of 60 teams in what would have been the Round Ireland’s 40th Anniversary year. Following the introduction of initial Covid-19 lockdown restrictions the original start date of June 2020 was postponed to 22nd August to allow time for virus counter-measures to take effect. Even with Covid restrictions in place, entry numbers for this year’s rescheduled race from Irish and international competitors held around the 50-boat mark. Photograph: David Branigan/Oceansport. Title inspiration from this unforgettable Olympic moment....

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