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kyiv libre!

I was a guest at Noroton YC during the Viper 640 Women’s Atlantic Coast Championship last weekend.  This bar menu at the Bombay Sapphire cocktail party caught my Eye and reminded me of a story that I overheard at the Bacardi Cup in March.  Many of you know me as Eye Sailor, outspoken on some issues, silent on others. I am not a schill for Bacardi. This is just a shout-out for a company that in an age of corporate anonymity is still family-owned, has supported a legendary sailing event for 95 consecutive years and has never forgotten what it is like to be refugees.  You all know the story of the Bacardi Cup.  For those that need the abridged version:  Don Facundo Bacardí Massó founded the Bacardi distillery in Santiago, Cuba in 1862.  Don Facundo’s wife chose a bat for the company logo, because according to Cuban and Spanish lore, bats symbolize good health, good fortune and family unity. The founder’s son planted a palm tree at the opening of the distillery and launched the legend of El Coco “ The Bacardi company will survive in Cuba so long as the coconut palm, El Coco lives”.  In 1926, with prohibition in the United States, Cuba was a hot destination for American tourists and American sailors. The Star class held its midwinter championship in Havana and the Bacardi family sponsored the Trofeo de Bacardi.   The Star Class prospered, so did Bacardi, and their namesake trophy hosted every year in Havana in the Star class became one of the bucket list trophies to win in the sport of sailing. The Bacardi family supported Cuba’s yearnings for freedom from the corrupt dictatorship of Baptista and so they (like many other patriotic Cubans) backed Fidel Castro in the revolution of 1957-1959.   Fidel rewarded them by confiscating all of Bacardi’s corporate assets...

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personalized

Champion race boat designers Carkeek Design Partners thought they were drawing a new one-off world cruising cat for an experienced yacht builder's personal use. Things didn’t quite turn out that way... Some of the best yachts are created when a race boat builder wants to go off cruising with his family and has a boat designed for personal use. Thus it was (initially at least) for the Carkeek-designed Seaquest 46, which has exactly the right sort of pedigree. It’s built by Mike Eaton, whose highly-regarded racing monohulls such as the Prima 38 and RP36 have proven themselves to be excellent all-rounders. Shaun Carkeek’s wide-ranging successes across many strands of high-performance sailing are already well-known to most… However, instead of going off cruising himself, Eaton has put those plans on hold and put the Seaquest 46 into production. It’s the first model in a new range of catamarans, built in Dubai where his shipyard has been based for most of the last 20 years. Before he’d even started, the first two Seaquest 46s had already been sold off plan. Read on....

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the eyes of summer

Leading Polarized Lens Maker Tajima Direct is kicking off summer and wants you to get back on the water with clear, sharp vision by offering all Anarchists 20% off any new pair of polarized lenses, including Rx, this weekend only. These are seriously the best polarized lenses I’ve ever worn. Use Code SASUMMER20 at checkout for a fresh new view in your favorite sunglasses....

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you’ve got crabs? make whiskey!

Hey, it's Friday A distillery in New Hampshire has come up with a novel way to make a product out of a marine invasive species - the notorious green crab. The green crab is a voracious predator of native shellfish, and it spreads rapidly by means of hull fouling and untreated ballast water. It is considered one of the world's worst invasive species, and one of the hardest to control - especially since it has little commercial value as a fishery. It can be found on both coasts of the United States, and it is a major threat to shellfish populations, particularly soft-shelled clams. Attempts to promote green crab as a food source have had limited success. However, Tamworth Distillery - a small batch maker in New Hampshire - has teamed up with the University of New Hampshire's Green Crab Project to incorporate this unwanted crustacean into a boutique whiskey.  Read on....

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green heaven

Snagged this fab picture of the TP 52 Platoon and their friendly accomplice. It immediately made me think of The Red Hot Chili Peppers' song of the same name. Be sure to read the lyrics as the song goes along... Photo thanks to Morgan Reeser....

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22 knots in that?

You better believe it! Read it here: Winning the largest division in the race, the St. David’s Lighthouse Division with 108 boats, is Illusion, a Cal 40 owned by Sally and Stan Honey (Palo Alto, California). Illusion’s victory is the fourth time a Cal 40 has won the St. David’s Lighthouse Division, following on from Vincent Learson’s Thunderbird in 1966 and Peter Rebovich, Sr.’s Sinn Fein in 2006 and ’08. Racing with 1984 Olympic Gold medalist Carl Buchan (Seattle, Wash.), fellow Cal 40 owner Don Jesberg (Belvedere, Calif.) and multi-tasker Jonathan “Bird” Livingston (Richmond, Calif.) as bowman, Illusion completed the 635-nautical-mile course with an elapsed time of 87h:01m:33s, good for a corrected time of 51:02:13 and a decisive victory of more than two hours over Andrew Clark’s (Greenwich, Connecticut) J/122 Zig Zag. Jim Murray’s (Lake Bluff, Illinois) Pac52 Callisto, the divisional line honors winner, finished third, just 15 seconds astern of Zig Zag on corrected time. Sailing their “final hurrah” in Illusion (they’ve sold the boat to Stan’s nephew), Sally Honey said it was the perfect ending to an illustrious, 33-year run with the boat. Illusion, the Class 10 and St. David's Lighthouse Division winner, arrives in Hamilton Harbour early on Tuesday morning. Credit: Chris Burville “The conditions were perfect for our boat, and we had a pretty good navigator onboard,” said Sally, referring to her record-setting husband, Stan. “Stan chose a really good course, and the conditions were just what the boat loves, heavy-air reaching. A lot. We got into a Gulf Stream eddy and stayed in it for about seven hours. That gave us a good boost. We managed to stay in the wind most of the way down. We had a couple of light spots, but nothing like the later boats." Sally Honey said that they hit...

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