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lottsa love, ladies

Today is International Women's day. An opportunity for a sweet homage to all the sailors who make a  difference in their own way, often the arduous way, and get results on the podium. Whats not to love?...

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dollah dollah bill y’all

From those thinky people at Stephens Waring Yacht Design... With the launch of Anna — our new all-custom 65-foot daysiler, behind us, we’ve had a moment to consider not just the value of a new custom boat, but the value that custom boat creates. Because if you think about it, a custom-boat’s value is subjective and straightforward: How much did she cost to build? How much might a new buyer pay for her? What might it cost for potential owners to have a similar experience with another yacht? No matter how unique a custom boat, her value is basically a few numbers agreed on by consenting adults. But the value created by that all-custom boat — something like Anna that built by skilled craftspeople in a prosperous place like Maine, using the best possible global components — turns out to be a narrative as complex as custom vessels themselves. What was the value in payroll and insurance to the workers who crafted that custom boat’s hull, interior and finishes? What impact did the design fees paid to her engineers and architects have to their local economies? How much did the cost of her hardware and systems flow to the workers and owners of those operations? The planks for custom boats doesn’t just come from Maine, these materials are shipped in from places like western North America and Southern Asia. Spars and rigging may be designed in New Zealand, but they are built in factories in Sri Lanka or South Africa.  Read. on....

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ice breaker

You know we can't get enough of these videos. This from Anarchist james shows   bunch of Polish guys ripping it up on perfect ice and breeze- some cool mark roundings and even a dismasting at about 3:20. Happy Friday....

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cool tool

The Helly Hansen National Offshore One Design Regatta returns to the West Coast, San Diego, March 15 – 17th 2019 where six RS21s will race in South Bay. The RS21 charters have been booked through the RS Sailing website and RS are excited to introduce the sailors racing in the next NOOD regatta. Alan Field is the current Martin 242 North American Champion as well as the silver medallist at the most recent Melges 24 World Championships in BC. There is no doubt that Alan will be putting the RS21 through her paces around the course. The program director of San Diego Yacht Club, John Fretwell, and coach, Molly Pleskus, have a wide range of experience hosting one design events. These include the Lipton Cup and the California Dreaming Match Racing Series and will be looking forward to three days of exciting racing. Other sailors include Scot Tempesta, the editor of Sailing Anarchy, Mike Mahoney who is from St Francis and Mark Werder. “The racing area for the RS21 is on South Bay which is just South of the Coronado bridge” explained Ed Furry, US RS21 representative. “The location provides flat water and good breeze which will be a lot of fun!” Charter boats are now available to book for Charleston Race Week, April 11-14 via the RS Sailing Store website for $2,500.00 per boat. Team Baba Booey is pretty psyched to be sailing an RS 21 in the upcoming NOOD .  We've liked the look of these things from the time we saw them for the first time at the Dusseldorf Boat Show last year. Of course I'll give you updates and if we don't win, I'll blame it on the shit PHRF rating! ... - ed....

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god damn crude

The owner of the wrecked bulker Solomon Trader issued its first public statement about the incident on Wednesday, more than one month after the vessel went aground on a reef in the Solomon Islands. In a joint release with the ship's insurer, Hong Kong-based shipowner King Trader said that it feels "deep remorse" for the vessel casualty, which it described as "totally unacceptable." The previous day, Australia's Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade criticized King Trader and its insurer for their alleged delay in addressing the accident. “Australia has been profoundly disappointed by the slow response of these companies, and their lack of adequate communications with and responsiveness to the Solomon Islands government,” the department wrote in a statement. The Trader's grounding on Rennell Island, the southernmost island in the Solomons, has resulted in the release of about 100 tonnes of fuel oil into the marine environment and damage to about three miles of reef-covered shoreline. The eastern half of Rennell is the world's largest raised coral atoll, and is a designated UNESCO World Heritage Site; Australian officials say that the spill is now moving towards the protected area's boundary.  Read on thanks to MarEx.  ...

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winter wonderland

MIAMI, FLA (March 7, 2019) – It was one amazing sailing day in Biscayne Bay, with typical Miami winter conditions of strong breeze, sunshine and small chop. Racing doesn’t get better than this for the 165 teams racing at the Bacardi Invitational Regatta. Race day 1 got underway in the J/70, Melges 24, Viper 640 and Flying Tigers 7.5, with the Star Class enjoying race day 4. Two races for the Star fleet, to make up for no racing on Tuesday. A grueling and challenging day as the Star Class racing here respects the original Bacardi format, used since its inception in 1927, of races legs that are at least 2 miles long, and last up to two hours. With so much depth in performance, there were plenty of lead changes today as the shifty breeze further out on the bay tested the best. Results....

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truckin’

Webb Chiles does things you can only imagine. After a seventeen day passage from Hilton Head Island, South Carolina, to Colon, Panama, that saw a 43 knot gale, the Bahamas become a dangerous lee shore, failure of three tiller pilots and the wind instruments, the port pipe berth sheer off the rivets attaching it to the hull, and far too many ships, GANNET, my Moore 24, was trucked across the Isthmus and is now on a mooring at the Balboa Yacht club almost prepared for what hopefully will be the final passage of her circumnavigation, the 3,000 mile sail partly against prevailing wind and current to San Diego. GANNET presented insuperable problems for making the transit in the Panama Canal, which I have done three times previously in larger boats: no way to feed or sleep four line handlers, no sun shade for the advisor, no enclosed head, too small cleats for lock lines. Another problem, speed, could have easily been solved by renting or borrowing a bigger outboard. I do not know if the Canal authorities would have permitted the little boat to be towed through by another yacht. No offer of a tow came forth, so I arranged for a cradle to be made and the truck ride. GANNET made the fastest crossing of any sailboat—at times clocking 43 knots—and probably the most expensive. I do not yet know the final total, but it will work out to be considerably more than $100 a mile. The charge alone for the travel lift to put GANNET in the water was an outrageous $856. I will not push hard against strong wind on the sail to San Diego. I will sail wide angles, slow down, even heave to and wait for favorable conditions. It is possible that I will divert...

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