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he likes to watch

They have said for years that watching sailboats race is about as interesting as watching grass grow; but not anymore and most definitely not if you watched the final race of the SailGP series that took place yesterday in Marseille, France. It was an absolute nail biter and an extremely close finish between the Australian team led by Tom Slingsby and the Japanese team led by Nathan Outteridge. The SailGP series started in February in Sydney, Australia and was contested in San Francisco, New York, Cowes with the final series in Marseille this past weekend. The Australians and the Japanese dominated throughout the competition making some of the racing quite boring to watch as the leaders stretched out their lead over the other teams, but the racing in Marseille was really great because the other four teams had really upped the game and were very competitive with the Chinese actually winning one of the races. The way the series works is that the teams accumulate points over the course of the five series with the two top boats going head-to-head in a final showdown for a million dollar prize money. The conditions in Marseille were perfect as the two teams lined up for the start but the nerves must have been full-on for Slingsby and his team because they entered the start area early and were immediately assessed a penalty that being that they would have to start behind the Japanese team. When the start gun fired the Japanese were at full speed and to windward of the Australians and rocketed to the first turning mark where the Australians followed them around just a boat length astern. The following leg was a real dogfight as both boats tacked up the windward leg crossing within inches of each other with Japan...

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a reason to smile

At no cost to you, a portion of your purchases through Amazon can be donated to Warrior Sailing. You simply need to visit smile.amazon.com and list USMMA Sailing Foundation* as your chosen charity. After you're set up, be sure to do all your shopping through smile.amazon.com for your contribution to count. Any purchases made through amazon.com rather than smile.amazon.com will not benefit Warrior Sailing. The AmazonSmile site has the same functionality as Amazon--your account settings, shopping cart, and lists will be the same as on the main site. Remember to get on smile.amazon.com before you checkout!...

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savaged

Matthew Taylor, owner of Savage Yachts LLC in Madeira Beach, faces several charges A Florida business owner was arrested Friday and faces multiple charges associated with operating his yacht brokerage firm as a Ponzi scheme and cheating four customers of US$1.5m. The Pinellas County Sheriff’s office has charged 42-year-old Matthew Taylor, owner of Savage Yachts LLC in Madeira Beach, with one count of first-degree scheme to defraud, four counts of grand theft and four counts of money laundering following an investigation that began in February of this year, according to WTTV-TV. Read on....

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yank this

There was a surprise registration at Fall CORK in the Laser 4.7 fleet: Cort Snyder, from the Lauderdale Yacht Club in Florida, who won the prestigious Orange Bowl regatta Optimist in December last year, and who placed 4th overall at the Garda meeting in 2018, with over 1000 participants. The Fall CORK regatta (CORK stands for Canadian Olympic-training Regatta, Kingston) was a 2 day event, held this year in summer like conditions. First day were light winds, and only 2 races were possible. For the second day, there were sustained winds of 12 to 15 knots, and 3 races were completed. Snyder won the regatta in the Laser 4.7 with 3 bullets and 2 second positions. Second in the Laser 4.7 was Noah Adler from Nova Scotia, the 2018 Canadian Optimist champion.  The Laser 4.7 fleet had 19 boats, versus 12 in the Standard and 68 in the Radial, which was won by Canadian sailing team sailor Coralie Vittecoq, from Québec. The standard fleet was won by another CST sailor, Luke Ruitenberg, from Nova Scotia. Read on....

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one and one and one is three

In a multihull marketplace previously dominated by two-hull offerings a lot of careful thought and informed-development is ensuring that the trimaran configuration is finally getting more of the recognition that it deserves... Rapido Trimarans, is the brainchild of directors Paul Koch and James Sganzerla, who ran the highly regarded and successful Corsair Marine from 1994 to 2010. Their collective experience of 60 years building more than 1,500 trimarans is combined with the corporate and production management expertise of Richard Eyre, Phil Johns and Damien Judd. The hard-won experience and eye for detail of this core team guides their talented, 60-strong Vietnamese staff at Triac Composites, who produce lightweight high-end composite structures that span numerous disciplines. Read on. Title inspiration thanks to a band we've never heard of....

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nanny goat state

A really good post from Down Unda: So first some context. My crew and I have just won a five race Winter Series with a score (after drop) of 4. We live in a fairly cold part of Australia and ironically winter (and autumn) is the only time our boat is eligible to compete in the top level of racing conducted by any of our three local clubs. Why, you may ask? Well, for some reason, even though all the summer pennant races are conducted in either smooth or sheltered waters (see map), the organising authorities have in their wisdom decided to over-ride the Australian Sailing Category 5 Safety requirements and insist that a fitted (not hand-held) VHF radio must be installed. For those in other regions the safety categories are: Race Category Description Category 0 N/A (Trans-oceanic races) Category 1 Offshore races of long distance and well offshore, where boats must be self-sufficient for extended periods of time, capable of withstanding heavy storms and prepared to meet serious emergencies without the expectation of outside assistance. Category 2 Offshore races of extended duration along or not far removed from shorelines or in large unprotected bays or lakes, where a high degree of self-sufficiency is required of the yachts. Category 3 Offshore races across open water, most of which is relatively protected or close to shorelines. Category 4 Short offshore races, close to shore in relatively warm or protected waters, normally held in daylight. Category 5 Races with limited rescue availability, in protected waters, in daylight hours or in sheltered waters at night. Category 6 Short races close to the shoreline in protected waters, in daylight hours only and with effective rescue availability Category 7 Short races in sheltered waters, in daylight hours only and with effective rescue availability. Boats not complying with...

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