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how much?

We don't pretend to know what all slip rates are in Southern California, but we know they aren't cheap. Looks like the people who run in The Marina in Dana Point think they are too cheap. Far too cheap in fact. They are raising slip fees by as much as 90% for 55' - 60' slips. 90%?? I did a little math and for the privilege of docking at "The Marina", it would cost me $910.00 per month for my Ericson 35-2. Over nine hundred bucks a month, just to park it?  Seriously?  If this is an attempt to squeeze out middle-class boaters, they are well on their way. Read their incredibly weak reasons for the rates increase here. And just for some fun, let's play the game of "How badly would I get ripped off for my boat?" by just clicking here for the rates. If they get away with this, look for a slip increase coming to a marina near you!...

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mr. dna

Imagine a yacht that’s thrillingly fast and fun to sail but isn’t shaped and built according to the constraints of a rulebook. A responsive, rewarding yacht that sails and handles brilliantly in a wide variety of wind and sea conditions, on all points of sail, and hasn’t been optimized just for windward-leeward courses. One with more than ample space, comfort and contemporary style inside but without any compromises made at the expense of sailing balance or performance. A yacht that can easily handle the wildest weather you’re ever likely to encounter, but also excels at fair-weather family cruising. That’s the design DNA of X-Yachts’ Pure X range. The new X5⁶, launched into the icy waters of Baltic Denmark in the depths of December for initial sea trials, is designed, engineered and built to take this ongoing evolution of the perfect all-around performance cruiser to a whole new level. Thomas Mielec, X-Yachts’ director of design and engineering, was on board for the sea trials and sent good news back to the yard. Read on....

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in-build

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U9CGgiXVyf0&t=64s Always fascinating to see how boats, custom and production, are actually. This is the Seawind 1370....

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sailing the seas of snot

Last week we ran this story of massive quantities of marine mucilage – otherwise known as “sea snot” – from the surface of Turkey’s Sea of Marmara, the enclosed body of water between the Aegean and the Bosporus. Now, here is a shot of snot sailing in that mess. Wow....

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quite the dick!

The second annual transatlantic Route Saint Pierre Lorient - Pure Ocean Challenge, with a mission to raise awareness of the threats to ocean health, has set a new record time for the crossing. Four-times Transat Jacques Vabre winner Jean-Pierre Dick made the crossing in 7 days, 17 hours and 4 minutes, beating his time last year by over 19 hours. The previous record, of over 10 days, was set by French sailing legend Eric Tabarly in 1987. Jean-Pierre Dick’s JP54 - Ville de Nice arrived in the Brittany port on Tuesday 22nd June at 11:23 UTC, having left Saint-Pierre et Miquelon on Monday 14th June. Along the way, the canting keel yacht released two drifter buoys to help increase scientific understanding of ocean health. Jean-Pierre Dick said: “I am extremely happy to have beaten the record I set last year on a crossing I really enjoy doing in this pearl of the maritime world. We were fortunate that the conditions helped us set a really good time. “By dropping drifter buoys we are able to help increase scientific knowledge of our oceans and how they are critical to regulating the earth’s climate and to supporting biodiversity. The challenge is now on for next year’s edition” Offshore sailor Philippe Paturel, founder and president of Route Saint-Pierre et Miquelon, who co-organized the second edition of the challenge, will be working with David Sussmann, founder of Pure Ocean, on the next edition of the race. David Sussmann said: “It’s great that Jean-Pierre has set a new time for the crossing and is helping Pure Ocean achieve its mission. We will be working to make the challenge a permanent fixture in the sailing calendar, combining sport and science to restore ocean health.” A drifter buoy was deployed in the Labrador Sea, between the Arctic...

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not so wild

The Giraglia was the first opportunity to check the latest upgrades we made on Wild Joe for the 2021 season. The original forward rudder had been replaced by a daggerboard to support the upwind performance of the canting keeler. We had expected this configuration to make the boat go faster on running angles.  The regatta proved to be a difficult one for us. There was only an hour and a half, when we could take good advantage of the DSS system. The rest of the racecourse had either light stuff in store for us, or upwind sailing. However at the start we saw more breeze than had forecasted, so the first few hours our progress was quite ok on the downwind leg to Cannes. The wind was getting softer and softer after the rounding and we were sailing upwind near the rhumb line towards the Rock. Our first costly mistake was on the second day early morning, when we stuck in a windhole for more than an hour 25 miles from Giraglia. Some of our main contenders escaped on a narrow gate of southerly patch caused us 10 miles to make up on them.  After a short and fast joyride on the DSS at the beautiful Giraglia we took a more easterly route compared to the boats closest to us. The wind shifting to our bow this easterly position saw us passing our closest rivals about 15 miles to the finish.  With the finish just a stone throw away the breeze died entirely. We lost about 3 hours parking there before we concluded the regatta. All in all the boat was going well, we got rid of the rust in the teamwork so we hope for a race with a better outcome next time.  Marcell Goszleth...

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info war

The prestigious Rolex Fastnet Race is just a few weeks away, and competitors who have the most accurate data on hand will be able to make the best possible decisions for the fastest route. The Fastnet is genuinely a navigators' race, as it challenges competitors to negotiate some very tricky tidal situations - such as whether to head offshore for pressure or tuck inshore to avoid the worst of an adverse tide. This year's race is exciting because it's finishing in France for the first time, and the last section involves negotiating the notorious Alderney Race, with currents of up to 9 kts. By popular demand, Tidetech is again providing an exceptional package for this year's race, with 400m resolution tidal current GRIBs for the whole race area and 100m GRIBs for the Solent and Dorset Coast. In addition, GRIB's are available before the start of the race for pre-planning and strategy, and historical GRIBs for the last six races are also available so that navigators can run multiple scenarios based on historical wind and tidal data. With validated model accuracy, this unprecedented level of detail gives you the best chance against competitors who rely on less detailed data. Check it out....

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damn technology

Three days into its historic voyage attempting to become the largest autonomous vessel to cross the Atlantic, project organizers are reporting that the Mayflower has experienced a “small mechanical issue,” and that they are stopping the voyage. A recovery team reached the autonomous vessel on June 21. “We decided not to force the ship to continue as what's broken is easy to fix at the moment. Our team is on their way to get the ship, and the Mayflower is waiting,” the team put out as a mission status update. Initial updates on June 18 only said that there was a small malfunction, but the vessel would be taken back to base to investigate and that they hoped to restart the voyage shortly. Read on....

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