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be still my beating heart

Sting saw the Hybrid Wing of the Eagle Class 53 from a distance and decided to go to the Marina to check out the boat. He was show around by Tommy Gonzalez (boat captain & Builder) Randy Smyth and of course our Little Richard Langdon took the photos… He was fascinated by the boat and concept .. not sure if he wants one too but we can live in hope!!!...

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don’t diss dss

In today’s world of foiling mania Hugh Welbourn’s latest DSS Infiniti 52 is expected to be out and winning big IRC and ORC races long before some of its more fanciful rivals have (somehow) obtained a first rating. Land the plane, sink the putt or simply shoot to score – eventually the design process ends, or it is supposed to. Months of work and years of experience begin to take form as a physical entity. There is an interesting transition when committing to something, however small, in the design of a yacht. It is almost impossible for a single element of the design not to have a consequence within the remainder of the process. Of course, at an elemental level, everything weighs something; we have not managed to deal with that particular problem yet. However, in conjunction with the excitement and emotional energy that comes with taking plans and ideas to reality, is the knowledge that you have had to earn the trust and confidence of the end user. This sounds simple, but it goes far beyond basic economics of buyer and seller – this is a journey which ultimately places one half of the deal on a modestly sized, high performance sailing yacht, travelling at speeds hitherto within the reach of very few people, far, far from land. Read on....

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five-ringed circus

The current unseemly squabbling over which sailing classes should be medal events at the Summer Olympics does little credit to World Sailing, the international class associations or the Games themselves. This tension arises from two sources: the inherently complex variety of sailing as a sport, and, the peculiar standards by which individual sports gain their relative status within the Olympics. Consider these comparisons. There are just two medals for football, the world’s most popular sport, but 12 for fencing. Eighteen gold medals can be won in wrestling, 15 in judo and shooting, 14 in weightlifting and rowing, 13 in boxing, and 12 in canoe/kayak. Sailing has 10 medal events.  How can such a distorted emphasis on minority sports be reconciled with their modest popularity? The answer lies in the International Olympic Committee’s criteria for inclusion. Numbers of participants or the size of the fan base don’t count. “Prevalence” is judged by the number of continents and countries that regularly compete in a given sport.  This is a silly reflection of the supposedly democratic principles behind the ‘one country/one vote’ system at the United Nations. The vote of Brazil (population 215 million) has the same value as the vote of Belize (population 400,000).   Further, when it comes to sharing the huge revenues from TV rights and merchandising, the IOC uses a system of dividing the sports into five categories of descending “popularity”. These are assessed on the basis of television viewing figures (40%), Internet popularity (20%), public surveys (15%), ticket requests (10%), press coverage (10%), and the number of national federations (5%). Sailing, which tends to rate rather poorly on most of those metrics, is way down in Category D, along with equestrian, handball and taekwondo. (Not surprisingly, athletics, swimming and gymnastics dominate Category A.)  World Sailing hoped that the new...

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minus the dotard

Remember when the bloated orange criminal said that windmills caused cancer? Look what happens when you put an adult in charge... The Biden administration's Interior Department has given its final approval for the construction of the first full-scale offshore wind farm in federal waters. The long-anticipated approval for the Vineyard Wind project brings years of debates and delays to an end, and it provides new regulatory certainty for the nascent U.S. offshore wind industry. In a statement, BOEM director Amanda Lefton pledged to continue to advance new projects in the pipeline with an "efficient and predictable process for industry and stakeholders." "Today’s Record of Decision is not about the start of a single project, but the launch of a new industry," said Vineyard Wind CEO Lars T. Pedersen. "Receiving this final major federal approval means the jobs, economic benefits and clean energy revolution associated with the Vineyard Wind 1 project can finally come to fruition.  It’s been a long road to get to this point, but ultimately, we are reaching the end of this process with the strongest possible project." Read on....

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hair brained

Of all the bizarre boating shit on Craigslist, this takes the cake... I'm going to be leaving in 2023 on a full global circumnavigation in a pedal powered boat and I'm hoping a few people with sailboats might be interested in "convoying" along with me. The purpose of my journey in that small, pedal powered boat is to promote sustainability and to advance environmental awareness. Using nothing but Human Power, I'll be circling the globe. All onboard gear from lights to computers will be powered 100% by my pedals.. as will (obvie..) propulsion. The refit process has already begun.. her existing deck is being ripped off and she's going to be lengthened from 16' to 22' approx. and then her pedal drive (arriving in a few weeks) will be installed.. the goal being to fully enclose her before winter and "fine tune" her appointment through the winter. Nothing is set in stone but my goal is to offer you, the sailboat owner, 500$ per month with a per- diem landfall bonus and a circumnavigational conclusion Bonus/ Balloon Payment. You'll also be covered for any berth fees, visa fees, and taxes/ charges unseen such as~ but not being limited to things like canal passage fees (the route proposes to pass through the Suez Canal, the Corinth Canal, and the Panama Canal). We'll, also, be having "Line Crossing Ceremonies" at specific points along the journey. Read on. And jump in to discuss....

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butt out

Two things about the recent New York Yacht Club (NYYC) challenge for the America’s Cup, one very surprising and one not surprising at all. As a club who held the cup for 132 years, thinking it was their own so much so they had it bolted down in their trophy room leading, it is said, to Ben Lexcen offering to lend them a spanner for when Australia 2 won The Cup in 1983 one would think they understood the rules. There is a legitimate Challenge in place to Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron represented by Emirates Team New Zealand from the Royal Yacht Squadron Racing represented by Team INEOS UK. The two squadrons and their teams are currently working on the Protocol which has been reported as due to be released in October of this year. Quite frankly, that Protocol, including any hints or teasers the relevant parties decide to release to other interested parties is solely the business of those involved. For the NYYC to try and ‘crash the party’ with a spurious challenge and protocol which has garnered a terse and yet perhaps a surprisingly polite response from those with the absolute right to put together the Protocol for AC37 including, one can safely assume, who can join the Challenger of Record in any kind of elimination series and under what conditions. It also gives the NYYC (undeserved) bragging rights if any of the elements of ‘their’ proposal are included in the ‘Official’ Protocol, whether or not the two squadrons were thinking along those lines already or not. I think in the commercial world it would be considered an attempted hijack.  So although the NYYC should know the way the game should be played the fact they have taken the course of action they have is not surprising...

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king of the jungle

A new book about Amazon founder Jeff Bezos appears to have confirmed long-standing rumours that he is the owner of a secretive 127-metre sailing yacht currently under construction at Oceanco in the Netherlands. The project, known as Y721, is understood to be a three-masted schooner that will become the world's largest sailing yacht when delivered. In the book, Amazon Unbound, an excerpt from which was published by Bloomberg, the superyacht is described as “one of the finest sailing yachts in existence,” with "several decks" and "three enormous masts". The book reports that an accompanying support boat is also under construction....

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that’s a good idea

When you read this article,  it states that  alcohol was not a factor in the bad boating decisions. Then perhaps hella smoke, because this sure seems like the perfect high af decision! Two mariners with questionable nautical sense were saved from the ocean near Isla Vista early Saturday aboard their homemade boat constructed from buckets and kiddie pools, according to the Santa Barbara County Fire Department. Read on....

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don’t hit it

The risk of collision at sea is a major cause for concern among skippers and protagonists in the maritime domain. With three retirements from the Vendée Globe linked to collisions, as well as other impact reported during the race, Class IMOCA is working to rally together the skills of the marine industry in a bid to break even more new ground in its search for solutions geared towards improving safety for sailors and the preservation of biodiversity. Containers, blocks of wood, drifting ice, unreported craft, waste of all kinds, as well as creatures of the deep of very different sizes and behaviours, the risk of hitting something at sea is a threat that continues to loom large for racers and yet it remains a highly complex issue. With radars, AIS, thermal cameras and acoustic deterrents, the equipment is out there and over the past winter the Vendée Globe was another test run for work in this field, but there is still a way to go. Read on....

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