editor

Uncategorized

no rain

Remember the total shit show that was the Gunboat 55 Rainmaker? No? Then click here for the full stories. And now it has been restored...to a powercat! Guess it won't fuckin' tip over again. It actually looks like this is what it should have been from the jump. Pics props to anarchist Mike. Song title thanks to Blind Melon....

Read On
Featured Slot 1

s2 redoo

So this little resto is presented in pictures, with eh, not so many words. It is an S2 7.9, put in a semi-cruising mode. Nothing like putting a little love on the thing you already love. Thanks to anarchist Gordon....

Read On
Uncategorized

wire to wire

This first stage of the Les Sables - Les Açores en Baie de Morlaix (197 miles at the start and finish of Les Sables d'Olonne, via Rochebonne and Les Birvideaux) promised to be tricky, the fault of a vast anticyclone planted in the middle from the Bay of Biscay. Tanguy Bouroullec (969 - Cerfrance), not only lead at the first turning mark, he went on to win the stage - very impressive! More here....

Read On
Uncategorized

there’s beer

Put a surgeon, senior management, software engineers, a financial adviser and a university student on a ROSS 1066. Limit the ambition of the crew to having an enjoyable racing experience, install a small oven onboard and place a well-deserved cold beer at the finish line. There you go: the typical beercan cruiser. There’s no better embodiment of the term than the Mad Jack racing team. And where else can you find a more passionate group of sailors than in Australian waters? COVID-19 gave us the time to talk to this highly motivated team from Down Under about good old sailing fun. Read on....

Read On
Featured Slot 2

inflatable foiler?

Here's a crazy challenge - with inflatable / soft / cross over surf, kite and foiling windsurf boards on the market that come ever closer to matching the performance and durability of traditionally constructed boards, might a 25 - 30 foot inflatable or RHIB style foiling centre board or keeler yacht be doable / practical over time? Trailers could be much smaller, marinas could simply have storage lockers and high flow pumps available, furthermore electrical outboards could provide power to get out of the marina - rigging would need to be speedy and simple - and interior and deckgear basic. But could it work in POST COVID times to boost participation if the storage, transportation, and construction costs are cheaper? Jump in the thread....

Read On
Uncategorized

demon rum

“The wooden, three-masted India sailed from Greenock, Scotland, on 4 June 1841. On board were 186 Scottish emigrants, including many young families from a single village who were travelling with their own church minister. A spilled glass of medicinal rum and the simple accident of a candle falling onto it caused the horrific ship fire. Once the fire took hold the flames quickly spread, engulfing the India and forcing the passengers to abandon all their belongings and crowd onto the ship’s bowsprit, huddling away from the wall of flames. Eighteen men, women and children died. Luckily, a French whaling barque – shown in the painting – soon arrived. It rescued the surviving passengers and crew and took them to Rio de Janiero.” (The dramatic painting that records this event is now in the collection of the Australian National Maritime Museum. More than a million people emigrated by sea to the Australian colonies during the 19th Century. Of those, fewer than 4,000 perished in the journey - a credit to the skill of sailors who crewed the ships.) Kieran Hasty – The Burning of the Barque India in 1841...

Read On
Uncategorized

case acap36/10

The title may appear somewhat dry and boring but interest levels may rise when it is understood it is a case in from of America’s Cup Arbitration Panel. Not only that it is a case where the ruling has a significant effect on an AC hopeful. As a bit of background, the Deed of Gift has always included a “constructed in country of challenge” element to it meaning any challenger for the America’s Cup has to be built in the country of the club issuing the challenge. In this case it is Long Beach YACHT Club represented by the team “Stars and Stripes”. Like so many of these rulings it takes careful reading as much appears to be ‘legal gobbledegook’. Read it here. However on reading carefully Stars and Stripes want to play but haven’t paid they are “in default” and they want to play with the boat lent to them. It would also appear that the initial ‘unhappiness stemmed from the Challenger of Record but Inios and ETNZ have also made dispositions to the Arbitration Panel. Stars and Stripes argued that the Deed of Gift contains the condition of being built in the country of challenge ONLY for the actual America’s Cup Match. However the Arbitration Panel’s response is that when the Deed of Gift was written there was no likelihood of ‘other events’ leading up to the America’s Cup match that would have an influence on who was selected as The Challenger. The Arbitration Panel ruled that the “constructed in country” applies to all events of the AC36 cycle and that they cannot use a ‘borrowed boat’ in the events running up to the America’s Cup Match. As that is the subject of the request for a ruling then other matters such as a request for exclusion of...

Read On
Uncategorized

an all-time great

The other day we asked you what this boat was, and now here's an update. Stormvogel ("The Storm Bird") is the ketch used in the Australian film Calme Blanc. Before being a movie star, this sailboat was the first very light maxi, ushering in a new era. It was built in 1961 in South Africa. This boat was commissioned by Cornelis Bruynzeel. This man is known to have invented marine plywood. For Stormvogel, he had three architects worked according to their availability. Thus Van de Stadt designed the hull and the appendages, John Illingworth the sail plan and the deck layout, Laurent Giles the interior fittings. This sailboat was a pioneer with a very light displacement (barely 31 tons for more than 22 m) and above all a rudder separated from the keel (a first for the time which is now used on all modern sailboats). The hull is in molded wood (4 mahogany plies glued with the resin invented for the marine CP) but the deck is in plywood. Subsequently, this plan was used to produce polyester series sailboats under the name Ocean 71. Read on....

Read On
Uncategorized

bobstay

“If there is one thing more than another which helps to form part of a yachtsman’s pleasure, it is what is known by the term ‘ship visiting’. I do not know anything, especially after having gone through a more or less roughish time of it for a few days, more enjoyable than finding on arrival at your port a goodly number of yachts riding at anchor; because though there may be many of them whose owners are unknown to you, still it almost always happens that mutual friends abound, so that you seldom are allowed for any length of time to remain an unknown quantity, and ‘Come on board’ very soon becomes the invitation of the day. Supposing the yachts to be visited are those drawn to the port or harbour for the express intention of racing, then most will likely soon be filled till the gunwales are almost on a level with the water with those all bent on a merry evening.” ‘ - Bobstay’ – in ‘Thoughts on Yachting’, Australian Town & Country, February 1882 (More than 60 years before the first Sydney-Hobart race, ‘Bobstay’ seemed to be describing what for many years was the traditional scene at Constitution Dock.)...

Read On
Uncategorized

the changes: episode 3

Racing Rules of Sailing 2021-2024 And so we move on to ‘Other Requirements When Racing' RRS 40.1 Personal Floatation Devices  Little change to the overall meaning of this rules however the wording has been ‘beefed up’ to avoid any confusion amongst competitors. As before if the ‘Y’ Flag is displayed afloat before or with the warning signal competitors shall wear a PFD “while racing in that race”. If the ‘Y’ Flag is hoisted with one sound signal ashore then PFDs will be worn at all times when afloat. However it has been added that instructions regarding PFDs may be included in the Notice of Race or Sailing Instructions RRS 41 Outside Help A brief respite here as RRS 41 remains completely unchanged. Now we have RRS 42 Propulsion which is, in any case, a land of confusion for many sailors, or at least seeing the actions of some, it appears so. The good news is that RRS42.1 Basic Rule and RRS 42.2 Prohibited Actions  remain unchanged so if you were breaking the rule before, after January 1, 2021 you will still be breaking the rule for the most part. RRS 42.3 Exceptions does however have some changes, changes that reflect the surging number of foiling boats. The first two exceptions regarding rolling to steer or crew movement through a tack and gybe ( RRS 42.3 a & b ) remain unchanged word for word RRS 42.3( c) remains the same for displacement or planning boats where RRS 42.3 (c )(1)  allows one pump (the each sail may be pulled in) once for each wave or gust of wind. However if you are sailing a foiler then RRS 42,3(c )(2) “to initiate foiling, each sail may be pulled in any number of times”.  Perhaps it is considered harder to get a...

Read On
1 2 282
Page 1 of 282