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fighter pilot

Straight off the PR... Richard Mille is delighted to be supporting Swiss team SP80 in its latest challenge: to break the World Sailing Speed Record in 2022.  North Thin Ply Technology (NTPTTM), a world leader in pre-impregnated materials, has also contributed to the endeavour by supplying Carbon TPT® for the boat’s structure. The team can now get to work on the crucial stage of producing the sailing boat, which will have to reach a speed of 80 knots (150 km/h) using the wind as its sole source of power.  Richard Mille has always been captivated by speed, aeronautics and extreme developments. When the project was presented to the watch brand by its long-standing partner NTPTTM, which produces Carbon TPT® exclusively for use in the cases of Richard Mille watches, choosing to support this incredible odyssey was an easy decision. Title inspiration thanks to John Cale....

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inspiration

Marlow Ropes are pleased to announce partnership, as Official Rope Supplier, with SailGP’s Inspire Program – the global league’s community, education and outreach initiative – which relaunches in Bermuda at the opening event of SailGP Season 2 on April 24-25, 2021. As part of this partnership, Marlow will be supporting the practical rigging program at each host venue, with the provision of rope and splicing resources for students to learn the importance of rigging and splicing, including how to make a soft shackle and diamond knot. The candidates will be left with a challenge to splice a Jib loop for the F50 catamaran and, if it passes load testing, will have their handiwork onboard one of the F50s. It's a great opportunity for the students involved, and we look forward to seeing their splicing skills! For more information about the outreach initiative please click here....

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sails you don’t know

Highly regarded, yet little-known outside of France, Incidence is looking to grow Matthias de Christen took over the management of the Incidence group sailmakers in December 2019. He returns with BoatIndustry on his first months at the head of the company in a nautical sector agitated by the Covid and shares his vision for the company. Read on....

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two-handed troubles

As an Olympic sport, sailing has always been problematic. It struggles to fit the fundamental “faster, higher, stronger” precept. There are just too many significant variables beyond the control of the athletes taking part, and too much reliance on complex – and fragile – equipment. Through more than a century of Olympic sailing we have seen scores of classes come and go. Many were hailed as the way of the future; most have lapsed into the backwaters of the sport, and even into extinction. (Seen many O-Jollies out there lately? Snowbirds? 15 metres?) So we shouldn’t be surprised that World Sailing and the International Olympic Committee have got their mainsheets in a twist over the untested mixed-gender, two-handed offshore race proposed for Paris 2024. What was hailed just a year ago as an exciting breakthrough for sailing now looks like it might not happen at all.  This is a mess of their own making. World Sailing proposed the event to secure their 10th medal competition and in response to heavy pressure from the European nations where two-handed offshore racing is booming.  The IOC initially waved it through without doing the due diligence that would have uncovered the many difficulties there would be in mounting the event as a fair and reasonable Olympic competition.  But the penny has finally dropped. The IOC has now given World Sailing an ultimatum with a six-week deadline: satisfy the Committee’s concerns on a number of key issues by 26 May or the offshore race is off. Reading through those demands it’s difficult to escape the impression that the IOC has deliberately set the hurdles extremely high. At least two of their conditions would seem impossible to meet. They turn on the high broadcast costs of an event of such scope and complexity, and the lack...

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look who woke up

Even Big Oil is beginning to figure it out...we hope! The opportunities in offshore wind continue to attract a broad range of well-known companies to the field, the latest being energy company Chevron. Through its venture capital company, which invests in emerging technologies, Chevron and Moreld Ocean Wind are investing in Ocergy, a developmental company working on new designs for offshore wind turbines and an environmental data monitoring buoy. "We are delighted about this partnership as it will allow Ocergy to advance and commercialize its technologies," said Ocergy CEO Dominique Roddier. "With MOW onboard we gain a trusted partner who will be able to provide an EPCI solution for OCG-Wind, a key requirement for many of our clients. We are excited to have gained Chevron's investment and look forward to potential opportunities for their guidance and expertise executing some of the most complex offshore projects in the world," said Roddier. Read on....

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the go go’s

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MCjd1Hbwe94&t=1s Justin Edelman and Jean Gotay continue to try and change the landscape of sailing media. For this 2021 Transpac race, they are covering a unique blend of crew. TRADER sailing is comprised of military vets and young women from the magenta project. The Military vets bring a mission oriented mindset but lack racing experience while the young women bring years of racing experience. Justin and Jean are focusing their 10 part series on showing what its like to race and answering the question as to what compels individuals to take on such an endeavor. Please show your support through their Indiegogo page....

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rock the bell

My fascination with the story of the Bell Rock and its lighthouse began in my teens when the Royal Tay Yacht Club had a race to the rock and back. The rock which lies abut 11Nm off the East Coast of Scotland was so called because in the 14th Century the then Abbot of Arbroath had had a bell placed on the rock to warn seafarers of its presence – it lasted but one wnter. Even though ‘The Bell’ had over the years claimed dozens of ships over the years and perhaps thousands of lives it took approaching 500 years when, in 1804, at the start of the 19th century a Royal Navy ship, HMS York, foundered on the rock with a loss of all 500 of her crew. This brought such an outcry in the British Parliament that finally the Northern Lighthouse board commissioned the building of a lighthouse on the rock. The size of this challenge cannot be underestimated as, not only did the reef lie 11 miles off, it also, apart for a few hours each tide (about 2 hours), lay below the waves. Critical to the success of the lighthouse was its curved base which, instead of resisting the force of winter gales, diverted the power of the waves upwards in what is now almost standard lighthouse design. How well did it work? Well the lighthouse was completed in 1810 and it still stands proud today, 210 years later and shows no sign of reaching the end of its life. About 30 years ago a couple of friends and I sailed from The Forth to The Tay and as we approached the rock I was cast adrift in the inflatable to get pictures of the light with the boat included. The North Sea provided benign enough...

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x marks the spot

  Part 2 of our close look at the Farr X2. Part 1 is here. Everything on the boat was placed with optimum ergonomics in mind, and the boat is probably over winched in terms of size. With things like the Olympics in mind and just mixed gender and shorthanded sailing in general, we’ve gone with bigger winches so that even a smaller person can apply full load on the Code Zero for example. Just to make things dryer and more simple, as well as easier to ship, we’ve gone with a deck-stepped, fully custom 2-piece Selden carbon fiber mast package that is specifically designed for the boat. The boats are shipped in 40-foot containers and the keel will be in a frame so that the boat arrives and is ready to sail the day you get it. Keel in, mast on, sails up in a matter of hours. The boat will come out of the container with a 2-reef main, a 1-reef jib and an all-purpose A2 so that you can immediately go sailing the day you get it.  The sail plan is extremely modern with what I call a ‘Comanche’ style rig which sits well aft in the boat. The boom goes all the way to the back and there’s a large J which enables easy multi-headsail flying. You can run a triple headed rig configuration quite easily and get into the furling sails quite early. In 17 knots, you could be in a furling A5 spinnaker, a J5 jib and a Genoa Staysail and just absolutely cranking. Knowing that you can pull a string and make the big sail go away allows for really safe modes of sailing when shorthanded. The main is a 2-reef main which is effectively a 1.5 reef and then a third reef...

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