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Locks, Stocks and Smoking Foils


Locks, Stocks and Smoking Foils

Since the widespread adoption of lifting hydrofoils, the International Moth has gone from a dying class of specialty tweaker boats to something totally different – the most vibrant, exciting, and prestigious singlehander in the world.  Finns are beautiful, Lasers are numerous, and the numerous trap boats, hiking boats, and oddities like the International Canoe are all fine and dandy, but the speed and grace of a foiling moth exists on another plane.  The things are simply a joy to behold.

Why else would a lineup of photographers like Sean Trew, Sharon Green, Thierry Martinez, and our own Mer  drag their ass up to Cascade Locks, Oregon for a 47-boat World Championship?  And what other singlehanded dinghy event is exciting enough to lure three different video outlets to its starting line?  And can you think of another dinghy class with thousands of dollars in cash giveaways for innovative slalom course racing and top speed competitions? Nothing but an International Moth World Championship has anything like this.

With upwind speeds in the teens and downwind speeds off the charts, the International Moth has captured the imagination of sailors around the world.  They might have no hope of ever mastering these tiny, ultralight craft, but watching guys like Simon Payne, Rohan Veal, Bora Gulari, the McKee brothers and Arnaud Psarofagis in a ballet dance with 60 lbs. of carbon fiber at 25 knots gives those sailors a dose of what we like to call “sailing porn.”  And just like the porn you bring to bed to keep your sex life fresh, watching bits and pieces of the purest sailing experience there is keeps their own racing fresh back home.