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Saving Sailing


Saving Sailing

There are very few people who are capable of articulating some of the issues facing this sport. We’ve had a number of conversations with Nicholas Hayes, and here is a guy who we think is one who can have a real and meaningful impact on the way people approach sailing, the way clubs are run, the ways that organizers organize, etc.to the benefit of all. He has written a brand new book, Saving Sailing that we think may do more to shake it up than anything previous. Below is an excerpt and a way to get the book when it is released.

First, the physics: We rig a sleek, lightweight canoe with enormous wings, some that face up into the sky and some that face down into the sea. We listen to our senses and nature’s cues. We point things in roughly the right direction and are always awed when pure, free, invisible solar power grants us forward motion. Impressive speeds require tiny bits of energy, and sailboats use what they get very efficiently, leaving absolutely no waste or wake.

It is an engineering marvel; a scheme to trick water and air to cooperate to give motion. So good that it approaches the possibility of perpetual motion. Tuned right, a sailboat can go on forever. Set the sails, lock the tiller and stand down. Some cross oceans this way.