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The 7th Annual SA Awards


The 7th Annual SA Awards

"We’re the future,
your future"

Our
annual, and yes, fashionably late annual winners and losers for 2007.
Good times.

Best
Sailor:

Highly
competitive sports very rarely produce an athlete that totally and
completely dominates the competition, and when they come along,
they change everything. Rohan
Veal
has done exactly that in the International Moth class.
He might’ve earned an SA award just for his annihilation of a talented
field at the Worlds in Garda this year, but what clinched it for
us was the effect that his technique and promotion has had on the
entire world of foiling boats. Were it not for Rohan, it’s pretty
safe to say that foiling would be years away from where it is now,
and like the best sportsman, Rohan has gone into early retirement
while still on top, letting the rest of the planet catch up to his
level of skill and style. Oh yeah, and as the Director of Sales
for BladeRider, he’s managed to get so many boats sold that the
factory can’t keep up with demand.

Honorable
Mention:

Also
in a league of his own is Francis
“The Machine” Joyon
. He chose a low-tech, green
design of a multihull to race around the world single-handed, and
proceeded to smash li’l Dame Ellen’s record to smithereens, all
the while displaying superhuman seamanship and speed with incredibly
short periods of sleep and rest. Joyon is no spring chicken, but
he may be one of the strongest-willed people in sport. In contrast
with the self-promoting bullshit artist below, Joyon does it with
grace and humility, and he truly has no equal in solo ocean sailing.

Worst
Sailor:

Definitely
a love him or hate him kind of guy, Tony
Bullimore
sailed a heavy, obsolete, monster catamaran to Australia
in 2007 to prepare for a half-assed RTW attempt that was doomed
from the start. He then sat around in Hobart waiting for a weather
window for more than four months – enough time to go around
twice – while his PR team spun off release after release extolling
the virtues of Bulli. He finally left Hobart (or was kicked out),
and sailed less than 2000 miles before a forestay pin let go, forcing
TB to sail painfully slowly to safe harbor in Auckland. A fitting
cap to a career that’s been marked by bullheadedness, busted boats,
and steaming piles of bullshit.