pyi-kiwi-12-16

west system fp banner ad 1 15

diab big

pyi vendee ad

Posts Tagged ‘World Cup’

Article Separator

screen-shot-2016-10-14-at-3-10-20-pmIt must suck to win an Olympic gold medal in your fifties and find out you’re not even ranked in the the top ten in your class!  This screenshot comes from Santiago Lange’s current, official World Sailing Rankings for the Nacra 17 – apparently, the Princess Sofia is worth 100 points, but the Olympics is worth nothing at all.   Unless it’s yet another in the endless parade of World Sailing fuckups?

Title shout to the Chocolate Factory and to the late, great Gene Wilder.

October 14th, 2016 by admin

Article Separator

Restricted and expensive access to good event venues are competitive sailing’s biggest obstacle in the USA.  Does this explain America’s Olympic difficulties over the past few cycles? Windsurf Olympic lifer Farah Hall reports that in Miami, it’s only getting worse.

From her blog:

In preparation for the Miami Olympic Classes Regatta, the first World Cup event of 2016, many sailors competed in “Midwinters” regattas held at the sailing clubs in Coconut Grove.  These small events have a history of about 4-5 years and are normally used as a low-key warm up before the World Cup.  However, this year one little regatta was the victim of an unfortunate trend in both the  Olympic class circuit and the American racing scene:  escalating costs for sailors, facilitating exclusivity.

The men’s and women’s RS:X fleets were stunned when confronted with a $200 entry fee for a small three-day event. The cost of the three-day Midwinters event combined with the cost of the World Cup ($350 for singlehanded boats plus $150 coach entry) can run sailors as much as $700 just to participate in the regattas. In Europe or South America, regatta fees for small events are normally around 40-60 euro, or  $50-75.  High level European World Cup regattas, week-long events, cost around 200 euro or $220.  Factoring in travel expenses, coaching or a boat (a critical need for RS:X sailors to reach the starting line on time in light wind and carry food and water), and the high cost of housing in Miami, this event can push even the most financially solvent competitor over budget.  American sailors are required to compete in Miami almost every year to qualify for the US Sailing Team.  For “average Janes” like me, it’s a steep hurdle indeed, and one that will remove any middle-class, self-funded but motivated sailor from the racing community.

Because less women than men were registered and paid online for the Midwinters, the women decided to defect from the regatta and hold their own event or “coaches’ regatta” while the men stayed with the original event.  (Even so, a third of the men did not compete due to the cost).  The entire women’s fleet removing themselves from the event was the fault of both sailors and organizers, but the incident strongly serves as an example of what can happen when sailing federations and clubs try to profit from sailors instead of promoting the sport.

Read the full story here.

 

February 3rd, 2016 by admin

Article Separator

Screen Shot 2016-01-28 at 11.28.17 AM

Fresh off a crew substitution (trading windsurfer Solvig Sayre for Louisa Chafee, daughter of dropped out 2016 Presidential candidate Linc Chafee) original SA gangsta Bora Gulari looked to be taking the Nacra 17 class by storm this week at the OCR, sitting in medal position after three days of tumultuous Miami weather. With just two events forming the full Athlete Selection Series (yes, it’s actually called the A.S.S!) for Rio 2016, Bora and Louisa served notice to the husband/wife team of Mark and Carolina Mendelblatt and US Sailing Team Sperry racers (and former SCOTW) Sarah Newberry and Matt Whitehead that they were gunning for the American slot.  But a breezier day on Thursday rocketed all the Americans back in the pack, and as of Friday noon time, Bora sits in 14th, the only US team with a shot at making tomorrow’s Medal Race.

Newberry/Whitehead’ss consistent failure to perform has allowed Gulari and the Splats to turn this into a 3-boat horse race, one of the few left in any Class as the selections get near the end. It’s fun while it lasts, though realistically, any of these cat teams are far more likely to be fighting for tenth place than a medal once they get down South. For a full look at how the Selection Series works and who’s got a shot, check out this story from Will Ricketson and the US Sailing Team Sperry team.

Incredible shot from the legendary Petey Crawford/Penalty Box Productions.  Full results here.

 

January 29th, 2016 by admin

front-banner

http://www.camet.com/