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Posts Tagged ‘storm’

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We’ve been accused of being a little morbid with all the damage posts, but that’s not it at all – we’re mostly stunned at just how much worse the damage is from Irma than any other Caribbean hurricane we can remember, and how long it will take to rebuild. Especially as so many of the spots are those that we – and tens of thousands of Anarchists – have enjoyed every winter for decades.

The drone video above is a difficult look at Nanny Cay (and thanks a ton to Adam Dell for publishing it), the haulout location for hundreds and hundreds and boats of all sizes and the long time HQ for one of our favorite regattas of all.   Click on the BVI Spring Regatta link for a look at Nanny in much better times.

There are literally hundreds of heartbreaking images from all over the Caribbean that you can find linked in the Irma thread, so please head over there if you want to share your own story or offer help to others.  We send our best hopes and wishes to all of you affected by this disaster of a ‘cane season in the Leewards, Virgins, Puerto Rico, and Cuba (some of whom are about to get battered again by the Southerly side of Cat4 Jose), and to the millions throughout Florida, Georgia, SC and Tennessee who might lose everything before this thing is over.  A special thought to all of you with property or boats n the Florida Keys, which look perilously close to armageddon in the latest forecast maps.

And now a word from Caribbean charter skipper and former Sailor Chick of the Week Lucy Jones – along with the folks at Performance Yacht Charters, she’s responsible for thousands of sailors enjoying the Caribbean over the past decade, and we listen:

Lucy and the team of Performance Yacht Charter are shocked and saddened by the devastation that has taken place in the Caribbean in the wake of Hurricane Irma.

These Islands hold a very special place in our hearts, we have been sailing and racing in these waters for so many years it truly is a second home for us, and so many of our sailing family.  It will take many months to understand the full effect of this hurricane.  

In the short term we can support with financial donations, to the Red Cross and other charities supporting those most in need. But in the long term it is imperative that their economy has a future and that the Islands are kept alive. These islands are dependent on our tourism and as sailors we can do this by supporting the Caribbean regatta season and booking our holidays. 

Accommodation may be difficult, the selection of boats might be reduced but if you can go to the Caribbean this year and spend out pennies in their bars restaurants and shops. This will fund the rebuilding of our much loved Caribbean for a long time after Hurricane Irma has left our memory.

Donating through JustGiving is simple, fast and totally secure. Your details are safe with JustGiving – they’ll never sell them on or send unwanted emails. Once you donate, they’ll send your money directly to the charity. So it’s the most efficient way to donate – saving time and cutting costs for the charity.

Donate here.

 

September 9th, 2017 by admin

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Like most sailors, we’ve never quite gotten the cruise ship thing. Why shell out a bunch of money to hang out on a moving motel that smells of burning diesel and the other thousand passenger’s farts?  Even more odd is how little ‘cruisers’ actually understand about what they may be getting themselves into; they never seem to know that it doesn’t matter if your ride is 20 feet or a thousand feet long – when Mother Ocean decides it’s time for a ride, she’s gonna give you one.  Click the video above to see what such a ride looks like on the monster Anthem of the Seas.

 

March 22nd, 2017 by admin

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Hurricane Matthew is close to finishing up his best impression of a Worrell 1000 race course, and the storm has now killed some 900 people (overall), done billions in damage, and left millions without power as he works his way up the Carolina Coast.  The footage above comes from the AP, and is mostly of a very wet Charleston SC.  Those gorgeous new James Island Yacht Club docks that made Charleston Race Week launching so much easier last year are smashed to pieces, while cars, boats and anything else with westerly exposure got slammed.  Fortunately the worst of the surge in CHS came with low tide, but there’s plenty of rebuilding to be done everywhere Matthew has already touched.  Incredible that the US has only seen four deaths (two tree strikes and an elderly couple due to generator/carbon monoxide) despite it all.  We’ll have more pics and stories of this direct hit soon, but with Matthew still lashing the southeast coast with nastiness, give a call to your friends near the water – they will appreciate it!

And for something really cool, watch the Frying Pan Shoals live stream right NOW!

 

October 8th, 2016 by admin

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screen-shot-2016-10-04-at-12-55-40-pmStill reeling from the 2010 earthquake that displaced hundreds of thousands, Haiti is now underneath the first Cat 4 hurricane to make landfall on the unlucky island since 1963.  Matthew roared ashore early today with winds near 150 mph, and he’s laying waste to a piece of coastline already facing a cholera epidemic, zika, and some of the worst poverty in the entire world.

Cuba’s next in the crosshairs, and our thoughts go out to another island nation that can ill afford the nastiness they are about to see.  For a really excellent daily forecast on these storms, head over to Tropical Tidbits.  For more forecast, read on.

The Show Must Go On?

Our own resident ‘cane ‘caster, Mark “DryArmour” Michaelsen writes, “the 11AMs are in and at the top of the track there has been another adjustment to the left. At this time NHC has Wilmington, NC as ground zero. The trend at the top has been to the left the last few runs. That trend may continue and put Myrtle Beach, SC on the hit parade.  This has major implications for the US Sailboat Show this weekend in Annapolis, MD.”

This latest ‘up the coast’ forecast also has major implications for the thousands of sailors making the annual run down the Intracoastal Waterway.  Whether you’re headed to the show or planning on being on the water anywhere on the US Atlantic coast, be safe and ask Mark or the community for help in the Matthew thread.

 

October 4th, 2016 by admin

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14212615_10154341241945540_4823284498242066801_nOur resident revolving storm expert called it last week, and sure enough Hurricane Hermine made landfall early this morning on the west coast of Florida.  Hermine brought flooding and winds to 80 knots, but all things considered it was a mild hit – unless you were offshore, where 25-foot sig. waves at an incredibly short 8-second period were the norm.  Here’s to hoping none of us ever have to see that firsthand…

As Hermine makes her way through Georgia and SC and then offshore, she’ll parallel the East Coast for a while.  Check in on the storm thread to see whether she’s coming for you and your boats.

 

September 2nd, 2016 by admin

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Screen Shot 2015-08-28 at 9.44.21 AMA pair of big storms is set to drench the US, but without a major hit in some time, you can smell most of America (aside from the Weather Channel and Home Depot) getting complacent.  Are we so programmed to quickly forget the current tragedy that we’re doomed to repeat it?  A look at New Orleans’ rebuilt levee system says ‘probably.’

Meanwhile, Florida Governor (and Midnight Oil frontman impersonator) Rick Scott declared an emergency today for the already homicidal Tropical Storm Erika, though she’s likely to do little more than make a muddy state muddier.  Erika updates from the Anarchists are in the forums here.

And on the Left Coast, Hurricane Ignacio is teeing up on the Hawaiian Islands, where ancient crumbling stormwater systems, infected sewage discharges, and widespread beach closures threaten to turn American indignation at the Brazilian Olympic venue pollution into a discussion of first-world hypocrisy.  Monitor Ignacio over here.

 

August 28th, 2015 by admin

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Beach cats plus cold front equals a hell of an expensive beach sculpture.  Huge bummer in the North Holland beach village of Egmond aan Zee, and there are some more gorgeous, if painful, shots here.

July 26th, 2015 by admin

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The PR folks at Crowley’s Vessel Management department dropped a beautiful if somber photo bomb on the web last night, along with a short report of their assistance to Rainmaker last month.  Meanwhile, we’re still finishing up the crew’s own ‘lessons learned’ from the incident, which you’ll see here soon.  More from Crowley (and there’s a closer shot of Rainmaker in Crescent’s lee here).

The crew of the Crowley-managed, 393-foot, heavy lift vessel Ocean Crescent recently provided assistance to five people aboard the damaged and drifting catamaran Rainmaker during a routine transit from Progresso, Mexico, to Halifax, Canada. Following a message from the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) to render assistance, if possible, the Crowley crew onboard diverted the Ocean Crescent approximately 20 nautical miles to the west where they found Rainmaker stranded with two inoperable engines and a broken mast, which had penetrated the forward port window and destroyed the vessel’s navigational equipment.

First on scene, Ocean Crescent approached Rainmaker, pulled alongside and shielded the 55-foot sailboat from seas reaching six meters. The crew also relayed communications from the inbound USCG helicopter and search plane to the sailboat’s uninjured occupants, both of which arrived on scene about an hour after the Ocean Crescent. Once each of the sailboat’s occupants was loaded onto the helicopter, USCG dismissed Ocean Crescent from the scene, thanking the Crowley mariners for their assistance.

February 27th, 2015 by admin

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In 2006, the Pindar team launched the most powerful Open 60 ever built – a title the boat would never relinquish.  Unfortunately for Mike Sanderson (for whom the boat was designed and built) and later Alex Thomson, the boat was never a contender.  Too powerful and draggy, too hard to sail, and too physically demanding for even the strongest IMOCA men, Pindar was plagued by drama, failure, and weak results.  

Even in the hands of Alex Thomson, the JuanK boat was a dog (imagine that, a JuanK boat being a dog), relegated to corporate and PR sailing duty while Alex and his team sourced other boats for his racing.  And while losing a racing boat is never a good thing, we have to say that the world may be a better place without more JuanK grand prix boats around.  The embattled Argentine has to be relatively happy with this calamity; at least this one didn’t break in half, lose a keel, or kill anyone.  More on the wreck from Alex Thomson management team 5West boss and long time Anarchist Stew Hosford:

The boat had been laid up in LA since the end of a tour last year for our sponsor, and we chartered the boat to a new IMOCA team in Europe to who were going to enter this winter’s Barcelona World Race. Our team were bringing her back to Europe via Panama for a re-fit when TS Odile started to appear in the Pacific. We had worked out a number of stopping-off points in case of hurricanes with the team securing her in Cabo San Lucas well in advance of the hurricane strike, and given the forecasts, it was a massive shock to the team, city, and nation when the storm intensified into a hurricane and bore straight down on Cabo.

By all accounts, the storm was brutal; “The End of the Earth”, as locals called it, shocked the entire region, and the morning after the storm hit, the picture you see above is what greeted our delivery team.  The boat was remarkably still in her berth, but took serious damage from flying debris and boats that had come loose, floating around while still attached to big chunks of dock and pontoon.

For the first few days, the team used what they could salvage – freeze dried food, water, diesel, and satphones – to help locals near the marina.  But without comms, electricity, or any way to get off the peninsula, the situation began to deteriorate badly into the looting and later, military response that’s been widely reported.   It rapidly became a crisis situation for us, and the guys on the ground somehow managed to get a small plane out of Cabo and return safely to the states.

So now what?  To be honest, it is not clear; while we are used to dealing with crisis at sea, this is something of a new problem for us.  The boat is most definitely not seaworthy and remains tied to her slip, but until the local government gets control over security and infrastructure, there’s not much we can do besides work on a plan for what happens next.  Given the intensity of the hurricane, the loss of life and property, and the fact that there are many people still trapped there, it is a stark reminder of what can quickly go wrong.  Everyone here has great hopes for the people still on the ground, and we wish them all the best of luck.

 

September 21st, 2014 by admin

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The start of the bi-annual Cape Town-Rio De Janeiro Race may have been warm and ultra-light as the Maserati Turbo Volvo 70’s video shows, but the 34-boat fleet knew it was in for a major hammering from a deep cold front and its associated low pressure system at the start.  No one chose to sit out the start and delay a day or two, though many of the boats chose to sail North rather than West into less breeze and easier seas; amongst those that didn’t was the Bavaria 54 Bille, which paid the ultimate price; one unnamed crew was killed, the skipper and another crew injured, and all crew have now been taken off onto South African rescue vessel Islawana.  

Various other boats have sustained major damage; rudders, engines, flooding, and we’re sure there’s plenty more, but at the moment, everyone is accounted for and most of the fleet continues on its way to South America.  As a CAT 1 classified ocean race of thousands of miles, the fleet needs to be able to weather this kind of storm, but questions are already arising about the Royal Cape and whether, with the well-forecast front, they should have postponed the start, as we increasingly see in even the most hardcore of offshore races.  We’re still on the fence; a delay can easily turn into a budget-busting, month-long drama like the Mini Transat fleet saw in November and can make skippers complacent about their ultimate responsibility, but it’s hard to argue that a human life is worth more than all that.  One thing is for certain:  This race is yet another reinforcement that robust trackers like the Xtra-Link stuff used by much of the commercial shipping industry is no longer an option, but an absolute necessity for any major race; only thanks to the highly accurate GPS info coming off the yachts that Bille could be quickly located in the 8 meter seas that would otherwise make her almost invisible from the water until a mile or so away.

Get in the thread for more info, and hit the tracker for the fleet position or to replay some of the bad parts.  The Cape2Rio Facebook page is the best source for the latest news from the event organizer.

 

January 6th, 2014 by admin

http://www.camet.com/

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