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Posts Tagged ‘scallywag’

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Longtime racer and New York Times Sailing Correspondent Chris Museler continues to lead the ‘big media’ in providing real journalism about the sport we love for millions of real people, and for the better part of a month he’s been working on a story about safety, death, and the Volvo Ocean Race. 

It finally ran in today’s Times, and we print a short excerpt below.  Photo of Fish from Facebook, credit Jeremy LeCaudey/Volvo Ocean Race.

Libby Greenhalgh was wedged into the navigator’s seat below decks on the Sun Hung Kai-Scallywag when the helmsman shouted repeatedly, “Man overboard”…

The helmsman hit the red man-overboard button at the wheel, which records the boat’s GPS location. But in those frantic moments, the button was not depressed for the compulsory four seconds it takes to record the spot.

Greenhalgh instinctually locked in the boat’s coordinates — 1,400 nautical miles west of Cape Horn in the Southern Ocean — into her navigation software, which shows the boat’s track on a digital chart. That was roughly the position where the crew’s safety officer, John Fisher, 47, was knocked over the side of the boat.

Rapidly calculating in her head how Fisher would drift in the frothy, cold peaks of the waves, Greenhalgh drew a search pattern on her screen. Fisher was miles behind by the time the boat was under control and pounding back upwind into the waves.

Greenhalgh directed the crew, shouting into the intercom. Four and a half hours later, with no sign of Fisher or the inflatable buoy and life ring the crew deployed, she radioed Race Control in Alicante, Spain, that they were suspending their search.

Read on.

April 19th, 2018 by admin

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Our 2017/18 Volvo Ocean Race coverage is presented by Musto, Official Apparel Provider of the VOR. 

No one’s quite sure whether it was the inclusion of Grant Wharrington’s local knowledge, Libby Greenhalgh’s excellent navigation, or straight up luck that gave Hong Kong Scallywag the all-important victory into the team’s home port (and with a secret press conference today where questions weren’t even allowed from reporters, no one’s going to find out soon).  We have learned, however, that if not for a well-timed message from Race Control, Witty and friends may have spent a few days sitting 0n a reef – or far, far worse.  Here’s the Jury’s decision regarding the unquestionable ‘outside assistance’ that kept Scally safe enough to pull a rabbit out of their hat at the leg finish.  To watch the replay of the incident, head to the Leg 4 tracker and backtrack to 0900 UTC on 6 January.

Question from Race Director Phil Lawrence Regarding Rule 41:

On Leg 4 Race Control noticed that SHK Scallywag was on collision course with a reef and sent the boat the e-mail below:

Hi Libby/Dave:

Just so I can relax a bit here in Race Control, tell me you are happy with you course in relation to Nerues Reef on Landsdown Bank. The Australian Charts have the Reef extending to 160 35E which is further east than the C-Map charts show.

-Rick Tomlinson, Race Control

Race Control did not give SHK Scallywag any further navigation advice.  SHK Scallywag lost 50 miles whilst the crew worked out a way around the reef.

Does this constitute outside assistance under RRS 41 as the crew were in danger? Please would you consider and advise.”

Answer:

The Jury advises that Race Control’s action did not result in a breach of rule 41 by SHK Scallywag. SHK Scallywag did receive help from an outside source, in this case the Race Control.

However, the help given is permitted under rule 41(d). The information was not requested by SHK Scallywag so it was unsolicited information. The source, in this case a member of the Race Control, was a disinterested source for the purposes of rule 41 because he had no personal or other interest in the position of SHK Scallywag relative to other boats in the race. Nor would he gain or lose in any way as a result of the position of SHK Scallywag in the race.

The source was an employee of Volvo Ocean Race who, as a member of Race Control, has a responsibility for the safety of all competitors. Asking the question he did was therefore a proper action for him to take.

-International Jury, Hong Kong

25 January 2018

January 30th, 2018 by admin

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Our VOR coverage brought to you by Musto, Official Clothing Supplier of the Volvo Ocean Race.

As Witty and the Scallywags close in to the skipper’s home turf on the way to their 5th place leg finish live on camera, the VOR folks put together this quick hit of sailors describing the Southern Ocean in one (or several) words.   A good little piece capturing genuine thoughts on the dock after a brutal leg.

As good as it is to see such a strong leg performance from MAPFRE skipper Xabi Hernandez and crew, it’s a bit surprising to see boat breakages on both Dongfeng and Akzo playing into the race so strongly this leg.  Caudrelier and his team saw mast issues ruin their chances for a win in 2014/15, and now their keel is the issue.  Or is it?

December 25th, 2017 by admin

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UPDATE: An initial version of this story inaccurately wrote that the VOR initiated the Rule 69 protest discussed below.  We have corrected the story, and we add that we’re told there was more than one complaint that initiated the hearing, including one from Oakcliff Sailing’s Dawn Riley and one from a ‘concerned sailor’ in Hong Kong. 

We’ll have much more on this soon, and of course there is a very active thread on the issue in Ocean Racing Anarchy…

We don’t think there is a more misguided, over-reactive and ludicrous “protest” than this. It is such a blatantly politically correct move that, combined with the ridiculous Rule 69 definition, helps push our sport into a new state of pussification. We are not surprised that whiney Dawn Riley is butting in an issue that she has nothing to do with.

Defining a Rule 69 as virtually any “misconduct” from what was formerly defined as “gross misconduct” as made it so that virtually any perceived violation can get one chucked from a race. Hell, this entire website is practically a running violation.

In this instance, using the word “scrotum” in a onboard, at sea skit is now “misconduct”? Fuck me. – ed

[A non-party to the Volvo Ocean Race]…have filed what’s called a Rule 69 against Team Sun Hung Kai/Scallywag, their skipper David Witt and navigator Steve Hayles for their stupid and sexist behavior in a video which was posted from the boat. For those not familiar with Rule 69 it reads as follows:

Misconduct – A competitor, boat owner or support person shall not commit an act of misconduct. Misconduct is: (1) conduct that is a breach of good manners, a breach of good sportsmanship, or unethical behaviour; or (2) conduct that may bring the sport into disrepute.

My Open Letter was in reference to that video but it was not to call out Witt and Hayles for their behavior. Instead it was to point out that the Volvo Ocean Race management let the video sit on their website for over a week and only took it down after being bombarded with complaints.

The hearing is this Thursday in Cape Town ahead of the third leg start on Sunday. The International Jury are on their way to South Africa to conduct the hearing. To be honest I am not sure what the penalties are but I guess we will find out later this week.

In this current climate where so many women are coming forward with claims of sexual harassment a video like this has no place on the website of an international sporting event like the VOR. Sure back in the “old” days people might have found it funny but those days are long gone and thankfully so. – Brian Hancock.

Title inspiration is thanks to Sham 69

 

December 5th, 2017 by admin

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