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Posts Tagged ‘Sail Newport’

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We can all yap and debate and jaw about how to reverse the decades-long downward spiral of sailing in the USA, or we can do something about it, and nobody is doing a smarter job of boosting the sport from the very top than Sail Newport.  When we say ‘the top,’ we don’t mean the America’s Cup or the Volvo Ocean Race – we mean the government – and that’s why Rhode Island’s shiny new Sailing Events Commission law(2017-H 5478A2017-S 1008) is a groundbreaking first step for the sailing’s growth in the USA. Here’s an excerpt from the WhatsUpNewp site:

 

“We saw the incredible economic impact of the Volvo Ocean Race’s stopover in Newport in 2015. It was such a success for Rhode Island as well as for the race itself that it didn’t take long for the organizers to announce they’d be back for the 2018 race. Rhode Island has also very successfully hosted tall ships events, black ships festivals, Chinese dragon boat races and of course, we were the home of the America’s Cup race for decades. We’re a great place for boating events, because we have terrific bays, harbors and waterways with nearby hotels and attractions. Plus recreational and competitive boating are deeply woven into our culture and history. With a concerted, statewide effort to seek them out, I’m sure we could be hosting more and reaping the economic rewards,” said Representative Marshall (D-Dist. 68, Bristol, Warren).

Nearly 130,000 fans participated in the Volvo Ocean Race festivities during the 13-day event in 2015, with more than half traveling to Rhode Island from other U.S. states and abroad. According to a report commissioned by Sail Newport, the economic impact of the 2015 stopover on Rhode Island is estimated over $47 million.

“Hosting more events would help not only our tourism industry, but also our boating and sailing industries. Making Rhode Island a bigger name in the sailing world would bring people who buy boats here, and help foster closer connections between our boat-building and outfitting industries to many more people in the market for boats, particularly the elite of the sport who invest serious money in their boats. There’s a lot to be gained for Rhode Island with each event that we host,” said Senator Felag (D-Dist. 10, Warren, Bristol).

Under the legislation (2017-H 5478A2017-S 1008) which passed the Assembly Sept. 19 and was signed into law yesterday by Gov. Gina M. Raimondo, the commission is to identify, evaluate, and provide recommendations to assist nationally and internationally recognized sailing and marine events, both amateur and professional, and to attract and encourage activity in Rhode Island. In addition, the commission shall advise state and local leaders on the suitability and practicality of hosting qualified marine events in the state.

Spain, France, Holland, the UK, New Zealand – all have spent millions or billions to attract, retain, and promote top sailing events, helping the sport stay in the spotlight while benefitting sailing businesses and coastal communities.  The level of American government support for sailing is a tiny fraction of what it is in these places, mostly because there has been no key event or organization working to lobby and educate politicians about the sport for decades.  The work that Sail Newport, the NYYC, and other key RI cheerleaders are doing is a model for the kind of lobbying work your organization can do in your home town and beyond…give them a shout and find out how.

 

October 7th, 2017 by admin

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Screen Shot 2017-03-20 at 9.47.15 PMClean Report

UPDATE: WATCH THE ANNOUNCEMENT LIVE FROM 0930 HERE.

As we mentioned when we broke the exclusive news that a true blue US team was back in the VOR, we were going to leave a little to the imagination about some of the moving parts of the new team.  Both title sponsors were extremely sensitive about their message and branding were presented at the right time, which is tomorrow (Tuesday) at an 0930 press conference at Sail Newport.

With all those months of secrecy amid toothy nondisclosure efforts, it was something of a surprise to see the well-guarded name of the new team – including both organizations behind it – pop up on Facebook the day before the big, live reveal.  As you’ll note from the pic to the left, the joint US/Danish effort will come with backing from the massive Danish turbine builder along with an environmental organization that’s been balls deep in smaller boat sailing for years.

You can certainly understand why Vestas wants to control their message so strongly, seeing as how they were something of a laughing stock in Denmark after their unscheduled date with an Indian Ocean reef and the months of ensuing mayhem. You can also understand 11th Hour Racing’s cautiousness; we all know that bad shit can happen when the scent of billionaire hits the water in this sport, even if the water is that much cleaner thanks to the Schmidt Family Foundation and fortune.

You can also understand the color scheme we previewed for you with that spy shot of Bicey last week; blue for Vestas, and blue/orange stripes for 11th Hour Racing.  Check back here in the morning for the live stream of the newest eco-team in the sport, and let’s find out which Dane(s) will join Charlie and Mark in the upcoming race.

And if you’re in the social media business, give the team a shout; they may be looking for someone new after today’s unintentional leak!

 

March 20th, 2017 by admin

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Global temperatures have moved into unprecedented territory this winter, but don’t tell Newport that.  Here’s the welcome mother nature gave to Sail Newport on the second day of Spring.  More here.

March 21st, 2016 by admin

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Screen Shot 2015-10-30 at 10.51.55 AMAs any visitor to these pages knows well, the sailing community has almost universally shared a sense of betrayal over the ‘appropriation’ of the America’s Cup to another country by the American defender.  At the same time, San Francisco’s multi-million dollar AC shortfall and the bad taste left in San Diego and Newport’s mouths from ACEA’s negotiating sleaziness mean that sailing events in America have a tough road ahead if they’re going to try to repair some of the damage caused by Russell’s flying circus.

Thanks to the hard work of the Volvo Ocean Race, Sail Newport, and thousands of volunteers and cheerleaders, that job just got a hell of a lot easier; that’s because the numbers are in, and the Newport stopover for the VOR added some $32M in direct spending to the RI economy and nearly $50M in overall economic impact, with the government laying out only a tiny fraction of that amount to supply the stopover with services.

So even though we don’t know who will be running the next VOR or what teams we’ll see on the starting line, we’re pleased to share with you the news that the stopover voted ‘best’ by nearly every sailor, spectator, and reporter in the 2014-15 race has been confirmed to be BACK in May 2018, the only North American stop for the world’s most-watched sailboat race.  We congratulate everyone involved, and applaud Volvo and SailNewport management for doing smart business while also acting as custodians for the good name of the sport.

Imagine if Russell and the ACEA folks would learn that these are not mutually exclusive goals.

October 30th, 2015 by admin

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Rossi Milev’s final report from last week’s J/24 Worlds has reappeared from the hole it fell down, and here it is. Congrats to Rossi and the team on a solid 7th place, and a big thanks to all of them for contributing to 6 great reports from yet another strong J/24 WC.  Also a big congrats to winner Will Welles and his crew on their first J/24 Worlds victory, especially long time Anarchist and contributor Luke Lawrence, who becomes one of the year’s super successful one-design sailors.  Luke adds the Worlds to a list of diverse overall wins including the Bacardi Cup (Viper), Charleston Race Week (Viper), Celebrity Pro-Am Nantucket (IOD), J/24 Nationals, and the Medal Race in the Finns at the Miami OCR, as well as 6th in the J/70 Worlds and 15th at the Jaguar Cup. Here’s the report from our favorite Canadian Bulgarian.  Vote on your favorite photo from J/24 Worlds at the Class Facebook page.

Brad Read made the call at 830 AM – it’s the Worlds, and that means we’re going out to the ocean again.  And what an EPIC day it was!  Very windy on the way to the course, and we were thinking the jib was the call again.  Waves were 90 degrees to the wind and looked a lot like day one, but the wind was from the NNE.  I wished it was day one and I could start this regatta over again from the beginning…

We had a nice 30-minute tune up with Will, with our boat finally moving really well upwind.  We’d moved the mast butt forward a bit to get less forestay sag, and the boat felt lit up. It’s always amazing when you find the sweet spot with the tune just right, and the boat just transforms herself into something beautiful.  Maybe she is called a ‘she’ for a reason!

In Race One, we again had a solid start just under the midline boat, burning boats off our hip until we looked good again.  The breeze was dying a bit since we tuned up and the shifts becoming bigger and more unpredictable.  We tack to port and look launched – until the next righty came in again and we can’t cross.  A few more tacks back to the left and we’ve gotta win our side.  Some things never change.

A very tight fleet at the top with Mollicone rounding ahead by a length or two over Will, with Tar Heel following.  We rounded fifth, and with good right shifts on the downwind it was a drag race to the mark and the new course change.  Not much changed for the rest of the race, with the order at the finish mostly matching the order at that first rounding.  With Mauricio Santa Cruz out of the top ten, it was now a three boat regatta – not gonna be a lot of match racing in the last race!

Screen Shot 2014-10-06 at 6.49.40 AMAs we grabbed another good start – five in a row now – I found myself wishing again that the regatta started on Monday.  We went straight again, looking good and playing the left, though the leg repeated the first race; right with more pressure and left shifts short but strong, making you put the bow just high enough to clear the waves and grab the lift.  Climbing up the ladder was tricky.

Mauricio was very patient on the left, surviving to round on Chile’s Matias Seguel stern.  Welles in third again, and we were top ten.  With Helly Hanson in the twenties and not a lot of passing lanes, the race between Will and Mauricio was on – but the boats behind suffered in few-to-no-gybe drag race.  A big left shift on the second upwind inverted the fleet, and some corner bangers made huge gains on the left; we went middle right and lost twenty boats.  Not the way we wanted to finish!

On the other hand, we were overjoyed for our long time friend and tuning partner Will Welles and his crew for fighting right to the end and winning a title that’s eluded Will for decades.  Well done, guys.

Screen Shot 2014-10-06 at 6.48.34 AMThe awards ceremony was a class act and a great finishing touch to a Worlds that celebrated the 35th anniversary of the first one.  Can you imagine predicting that the J/24 would still provide some of the world’s best keelboat racing a third of a century after its first Worlds?

Feel free to question that by coming to Germany next year and trying to win.  If you do, your name will be in some great company.

A huge thanks to Lavalife.com, Sailing Anarchy, and DryUV for their support of our Toronto-based team, which included Trimmer Chris Ball, Mast Mike McKeon, Bow Whitney Prossner and Tactician Chris Snow.  We hope you enjoyed our stories.

 

 

October 6th, 2014 by admin

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Clean Report

After two days of qualifiers, we’ve downgraded our expectations at the J/70 Worlds from top ten to top 25, and we’re not even sure that’s enough!  My tactical shortcomings have become obvious, as has the absolutely ridiculous level of competition we’re up against.  We take some solace that we are well ahead of all sorts of world champions and olympic talent, but we’ll keep grinding on the B-Squared so keep an eye out for us.

We’ll be trying to hurt the livers of some of our competitors tonight with beer provided by Torqeedo motors and rum, vodka, hot dogs and burgers and a couple of t-shirt giveaways sponsored by Eelsnot hull coatings and Sailing Anarchy.  If you’re in the Newport Area, come by the big red trailer in the Fort Adams parking lot and share a drink and a story or two.  6’o clock or earlier depending on the racing.

As for “ruddergate” – we heard there is a protest, even though the rudder was not used during a race.  Stay tuned.

Results here.  More great Paul Todd pics here.

 

September 11th, 2014 by admin

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A postponment at the Farr 30 Worlds gave some of Newport’s nippers the time to check out the deck of the Farr (or is it “YARRR”?) 30 Just Plain Nutz on Thursday; it’s part of Sail Newport’s very successful junior program, which includes one day of week of ‘dress like a pirate’.  America’s future rock stars? Possibly.  They sure did like the Farr.

Meanwhile, Deneen Demourkas jumped from 4th to 1st with one horizon-job win on Thursday; the back-to-back World Champ has a 4 point lead over Jabin/Larson/McClintock and another two back to Richardson/Hutchinson/Baxter.  With up to 20 knots today (and live coverage on their Facebook page), the shit is getting serious…Meredith Block photo and yesterday’s full gallery here.

Title inspiration to a guy that somehow managed to turn shitty drunken singing on a boat into a multi-million dollar revenue stream.

July 19th, 2013 by admin

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