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Posts Tagged ‘Ryan Breymaier’

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In Sailing Anarchy Podcast # 7, Mr. Clean caught up with some of the juice behind the badassery that is the Race 2 Alaska just before the start of Leg 2: First, a half hour with race founder and cool-as-stage-smoke square rig sailor Jake Beattie to learn some of the stories behind the race, second, 20 minutes with M32 owner/skipper Randy Miller, who is currently about 270,000 grizzly bear lengths ahead of the second place boat; most likely only major damage or injury will prevent the Mad Dogs from crushing the existing race record.  Finally, we spoke with Tritium Racing boat captain Ryan Breymaier shortly before they started (and then withdrew from) Leg 2 of the race.  Their story after our Podcast picks up here.

Whether you’re considering the R2AK in the future or you just want to learn the details behind what it is and why it and races it shares features with are so goddamned appealing to both competitors and the public, you’ll want to tune in for around 2 hours of the best damned sailing podcast around. To subscribe to the SA Podcast, head over to iTunes.  For downloads, embed codes and similar shit, go to our Libsyn host page.

You’ll find trackers and news and videos over at the event page linked above, but the discussion in the SA Forums is quite spirited and interesting.  Dig this race?  Head to the forums now.

You young punks can learn more about how crazy Alaska makes you (and the title of this piece) if you check out this site.

 

June 29th, 2016 by admin

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Screen Shot 2016-01-18 at 11.15.04 AM2-time Melges 32 World Champ Jason Carroll doesn’t do things by halves, and he poured a small fortune in upgrades into the well-worn Gunboat 62 Elvis over the winter in preparation for an active 2016.  Ryan Breymaier took the Navigator’s award last week guiding the big cat from Lauderdale to Key West.  Here’s RMB’s first (of many) high-speed reports from 2016:

The forecast was for northerly 15 knots at the start and easterly at the finish, which would have meant short-gybing all the way from Lauderdale in order to avoid the worst of the Gulf Stream current; not the forecast we were looking for, considering that Elvis has been modified with 4 meters more rig, a longer boom and a longer bowsprit in order to power the boat up and fix persistent lee helm.

The end result of the mods is that the boat has 50% more mainsail and 55% more downwind sail, with a roller-furled, tight-luff gennaker replacing a spinnaker in a sock. We were afraid that we would not have quite enough power in the VMG conditions with a tight-luff sail and would have bad gybing angles resulting in about a thousand gybes down the course.

The boat also has bigger winches to deal with the sailplan, a real traveller and hydraulic mainsheet (instead of a bridle mainsheet to the transom corners), and the secret weapon; tillers which allow steering from outside instead of the wheel inside just aft of the mast – which is ideal for communications and comfort, but not at all for feel.

Start day dawned exactly as predicted with a nice northerly. We happily got our favored pin end and headed offshore on port with the big A3 pulling nicely.  We even lifted a hull as we crossed the line! Regardless of the adverse stream, there was more wind offshore and we wanted to avoid the wind shadow that is often found near the Miami skyline.  This was an immediate split from our main competition, the newly launched Arethusa, 60 feet of Nigel Irens-designed Gunboat. They outweigh Elvis by around 8000 pounds, but have a big mast and the soft luffed full-size kite which we feared would be our undoing.

As Arethusa (and most of the fleet) headed inshore, we made a couple of short gybes and stayed in the pressure offshore, especially in light of the approaching transition zone which we could see in the cloudline ahead.  Sure enough, we ran into the clouds and were rewarded with an earlier than expected easterly shift and pressure.  We started to soak, but not too much in order to keep the speed advantage given by luffing slightly with our tight luffed sail.  Elvis loves this; we were sailing between 2 and 5 knots faster than the breeze at 130 TWA.

After a little while the northerly tried to reassert itself so we went back inshore to consolidate and cemented about a 4 mile lead.

We had been watching the radar further down the course, where there was plenty of squall and rain activity.  This is classic KW race behavior, with the northerly on the north side of the keys fighting against the easterly breeze offshore.  As the squall line  showed itself to be just South of the lower keys, tactician Anthony Kotoun and I agreed to gybe back inshore in order to get into it as late as possible.

We were rewarded with a huge northerly shift as we got to the beach with the TWD going from 75 to 350 in the space of about 5 minutes.  We were on starboard so we just bore away and found ourselves headed SW in the perfect direction down the rhumb line, but directly into the squalls.

As we came into the first rain the breeze came up quickly and we eased sheets to stay on course and peeled to our Screecher/FRO, and one of those spectacular runs you hope for came together; 30 knots of boatspeed at the peak, with about an hour around 25.  Awesome crew work from the Elvis crew through 3 headsail changes and reef in and out allowed us to stay at full speed, putting a further 8 miles on our competition.  That’s when we decided to do some monohull hunting, looking for Wizard and Spookie, who had started half an hour ahead of us.

As we finished the last 25 miles of the race we realized that Wizard had the VMG edge on us (to be expected as they are 70 feet or so and very well-sailed) and that we were just slightly faster than Spookie who we passed in the channel heading up to Key Weird.

Unfortunately for the more awake amongst the crew, we arrived a couple hours after last call and so had to content ourselves with a big lunch and even bigger evening the next day.

I am definitely looking forward to getting to the Heineken regatta where there promises to be a big Gunboat fleet to line up against, as well as the awesome dock parties which I am confident we can also win, especially given all the training the boat’s built-in rum pump has given us all!  The Elvis team are a great crew; sailing regularly with the same core team shows in the quality of teamwork on the water. It’s also been a lot of fun for me to reunite with some guys I haven’t sailed with since college 13 years ago – a great way to start the 2016 racing year.

Ryan out.

January 18th, 2016 by admin

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Driven in large part by one of SA’s closest friends, Renaud LaPlanche’s 6-month record-breaking campaign aboard the monster trimaran Lending Club helped cement the United States’ ascendency as one of the world’s preeminent multihull powers.  Along with Lloyd Thornburg’s busy Phaedo 3, Taylor Canfield’s US-One’s dominance of the M32 Series and now odds-on favorite status to win next year’s $1M World Match Racing Tour, and Oracle Racing “USA”‘s likelihood of taking home the Auld Mug, Lending Club has moved the goalposts for anyone looking to make a mark in outright speed under sail (or introduce huge numbers of people to the pointy end of the sport). For a wrap of their season, we go to Ryan (and be sure to follow as Ryan goes for doublehanded glory in the massive 21-boat fleet for the Transat Jacques Vabres next month).

After an action-packed 6 month charter, today the maxi-trimaran Lending Club 2 project has come to an end and we hand the boat back to its owner.  We knew from the start back in March that this was going to be a busy year, but I don’t think anyone realized how many people would come and see the boat or come sailing with us.

From the start we agreed we would have an open door policy and whenever possible we made the boat available for visits at the dock. Our skipper, Renaud invited all the Lending Club employees to come sailing and over 1000 of them took him up on the offer. We took children from sailing schools and students from all backgrounds and as young as 5 and 6 years old. We took hundreds of Lending Club guests and business partners in both New York and San Francisco. Everyone without exception had the opportunity to drive the boat if they wanted to and everyone came back to shore with a huge smile and an unforgettable souvenir.

We set three new world records in Europe, the Atlantic and the Pacific oceans.

We made friends.

We had fun.

Heartfelt thanks to the entire team for working so hard; literally every single day for weeks on end and for taking such great care of all 1500+ guests. Thanks to the racing team who stepped up to the challenge and brought home three new records. Thanks to our technical partners Switlik, Marlow, Guy Cotten, Events Clothing and Underwater Kinetics who supported us from the start and finally a huge thanks to our leader Renaud Laplanche for making all this possible.

Here’s a short video that sums up the whole adventure in a few minutes, I hope you enjoy watching as much as we did living it.

Ryan

 

September 17th, 2015 by admin

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Fresh off the obliteration of a decade-old Transpac record, Ryan Breymaier sat down with Mr. Clean for another of their excellent Skype chats about life, liberty, and the pursuit of speed.  Listen to the details of their incredible 3 day run from California to Hawaii, get the goss on their even crazier trip ahead – basically, a race back to Europe via the Panama Canal to get a few more records in before the Lending Club goes to her new owner. And perhaps most interestingly, listen to Ryan’s take on the major monohull records, and what kind of boat will be necessary for mono records to really start falling.

One of the brightest stars for the future of American sailing, and we’re lucky to get another great 36 minutes from him, with big thanks to Petey Crawford/Penalty Box Productions for the late night editing assist.

 

July 24th, 2015 by admin

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150401_LendingClub_002

Well, that didn’t take long!  Lending Club CEO Reynaud LaPlanche has only had his VPLP trimaran Lending Club for a few weeks, and he’s already set his first passage record.  Look for some serious records to fall over the next 6 months thanks to this youthful and enthusiastic Franco-American billionaire.  Project Manager and skipper Ryan Breymaier tells the story exclusively for you Anarchists…Mark Lloyd photos (except the last one, credit Quin Bisset) with galleries over here, and be ready for the LC’s next assault – the ages old Newport-Bermuda passage record – coming far sooner than you think.

About 15 minutes after our start in 20 knots of breeze upwind, JB Le Vaillant looked at me and said “We should turn around, go back and put all the sails up and start over!”  I was tempted to agree with him as we found ourselves with the J2 and 2 reefs in the main upwind in 12 knots, tacking towards the Needles.

150401_LendingClub_004NOT ideal, especially for breaking a record Brian Thompson and his crew set on Maiden 2 after waiting for weeks for ideal conditions; ENE breeze, super flat water, sunshine sailing.  Brian and his team (which included SCOTW Adrienne Calahan and C-Class hottie Helena Darvelid -ed) did the record back in 2002 with the full main and big gennaker.   Lending Club crew Stan Delbarre was with them on their record run, and he’s been warning me in quiet tones for weeks.  “Ryan, this will not be as easy as you think.”

Those words were ringing in my ears as I looked back to see a glassed off Solent arriving with the rising sun.  We’d pinned our hopes on the NW breeze coming after the frontal passage with a shitty (but improving) sea state and plenty of breeze to power across; our window before leaving for the States was short, and it isn’t the right time of year for Easterlies…

In the end, after hurried discussion with JB, Boris Hermann who was navigating, and Renaud who was driving,  we decided to take our chances.  Just tacking back and setting the right sails and then restarting with full main and J1 would have taken forever…besides, in front of us at Hurst Castle we could see breeze on the water, and the buoy observations showed 25 at Portland Bill and 28 mid Channel.

150401_LendingClub_105It was as if the helicopter taking video had put a line on our bows; our nose poked out into the pressure, we bore away to 195 true, our course across the channel, and then the wisdom of our 2 reefs J2 sail plan made sense, as the boat leapt to full potential, daggerboard up, foil down, traveler down, and a hand on the sheets, flying 2 hulls full time across the channel, touching 37 knots several times…

IT is amazing how quickly the decisions are made at those speeds, Boris says to me “don’t freak out, there is a cargo ship 4 miles ahead, it will pass 1/2 a mile behind us in a minute or so, come up 3 degrees on average to be sure they pass”, which means a corresponding retrim of the traveller so as not to fly too high; no swimming for this crew today, thanks very much.  Thank God most boats have AIS these days; without it, we would never have even seen the little fishing boats in the waves until almost too late.

As we got into the lee of Jersey, the sea flattened out completely, and breeze went aft another 15 degrees.  Sailplan management is key in general on such a big boat, but here it was just 15 minutes of hard work.  First shake out the reef.  6 minutes with 7 guys rotating on and off the handles, including two on a top handle in the halyard winch, 4 on the pedestals, and one resting, with just the driver with one hand on the traveller keeping us going quickly.  Then comes sheeting back in, and getting the traveller back up, another 3 minutes for each with 4 grinding on the pedestals.

150401_LendingClub_066Next, bear away and unroll the J1, 2 minutes grinding with the boat dead downwind to unload the sail, even with it in the lee of the J2, which is on hanks, so as soon as the J1 is sheeted, is just dumped completely, halyard runs, and the sail falls onto the net (thank god for not having to pull it over lifelines out of the water) to have 2 sail-ties hastily thrown around it so the two bow guys can come back and start grinding again, as the call has been made to get to full hoist on the mainsail!

Another 12 minutes or so, 7 crew over their aerobic threshold, with dead arms, and we still cannot let up for a second, as we are now flying two hulls full time on flat water, which means a 30 second grinding effort every minute or so for 4 guys in low gear to keep the traveller just where it has to be, central hull just kissing.  If it goes in, the boat-speed drops 2 knots, which is unthinkable, as Boris has informed us that we have 55 minutes left, and 25 miles to go.

I remember telling the grinder in front that we were literally lifting the hull out of the water with our backs, and it’s truly amazing to see the immediate effect of each turn of the handles.  The central hull literally lifts centimeter by centimeter with each millimeter the traveller goes up the track.

LC-credit Quin BISSETIn the end, we were 9 completely exhausted but extremely happy guys crossing the finish line with 8 minutes to spare in Dinard.  For next time, we’d like to order up a 10 degree righty in the Solent, and we will shave another 30 minutes off the record!  It’s never finished, is it?  On this boat, it really isn’t.  You sheet in, the speedo hits 30, and then you keep grinding.  Everything is easy, except the grinding.

We all owe a huge thanks to Renaud for making this possible.  Sure, the company he founded is on the sails, but he is personally financing this project, and without his vision and energy we wouldn’t be here. Also thanks to our technical partners; Guy Cotton foul weather gear, Marlow ropes, Great Circle weather date analysis, Switlik Survival Equipment and Underwater Kinetics technical equipment, who have made our lives much easier onboard this beast!

April 9th, 2015 by admin

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40ksb

New dad Ryan Breymaier and Lending Club have topped the 4ksb threshold in a fairly major way, and it’s just the beginning.  Photo credit to Quin Bisset and Q-and-K.

From Ryan:

“This was on our first day sailing after putting the 41 meter tall “big rig” in the boat – it’s got 5 meters on the rig that Loick Peyron won the Route du Rhum with.  Sail plan was a single-reefed main and J1, sailing downwind in 27 knots of breeze. Everything is going well, and our preparations for record breaking are moving ahead nicely…”

 

March 22nd, 2015 by admin

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As always, Ryan Breymaier is as honest and refreshing as they come, and as the first American to win an IMOCA event in a long time, he’s got plenty to say.  About his race and NYC’s sendoff (and what NYTimes’ Chris Museler has on his plate after crossing with Ryan), about big moves in the Open 60 fleet, about the soon-approaching Barcelona Race, and why he’ll be in Marine City, MI for a while this summer.  A half hour with Mr. Clean for the SA Innerview.

 

June 18th, 2014 by admin

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th martinez/sea & coOG Open 60 gangsta and Hugo Boss Skipper Ryan Breymaier hits the Sunday New York Times today, thanks to longtime Anarchist and NYT journalist Chris Museler.  Ryan, Pepe Ribes, and Museler head to Barcelona today; all the details are here.  Photo from Thierry Martinez/Sea&Co.

At 3 a.m. Wednesday, Ryan Breymaier had been prone on a two-inch foam pad for barely 30 minutes when the call came for him to get up. He was delivering the 60-foot racing sailboat Hugo Boss from Newport, R.I., to Manhattan as training for the Imoca Ocean Masters New York to Barcelona race, in which he and Pepe Ribes of Spain will sail across the Atlantic against four other teams starting Sunday.

Breymaier, a tall American with a mop of blond curls, winced as he sat up, keeping his head low to avoid the raw carbon fiber ceiling only inches above.

“You’re going to have to get someone else on the grinders,” he calmly transmitted above the banging of waves against the hull, referring to the shore crew that came along to help test equipment. “I don’t know what I did to my back.”

Read on.

June 2nd, 2014 by admin

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the boss is back 1

“Back” as in back sailing again! A quick repair of Hugo Boss’ broken spar gets Ryan Breymaier and Pepe Ribes ready for the start of the OCEAN MASTERS New York to Barcelona Race on June 1. Great to see them back on their feet so quick. Here’s the Tuesday morning update from Ryan, with nice photos from mstrsail, and be sure to check Ryan’s search for Vendee Globe partners here.

Since breaking the rig about 400 miles from Newport, it has been a stressful journey to get back on the water.  We were very lucky the break happened where it did, as the spreaders and most of the rigging remained sound, and allowed us to reuse them, and there was not one broken stitch on any of the sails.

Fortunately we were coming to Newport; if you have to break a mast, this should be the destination.  When we arrived at Newport Shipyard, all the concerned parties were there and ready to help.  Jimmy and Jay from the Shipyard have been great, Scott and Dave from Composite Rigging, Chuck, Mike, and the rest of the Southern Spars team, and Stew, Vinny, and Dan from Al Fresco composites are all great guys at the top of their respective games, and each put in long hours to see us back on the water as soon as possible.

Of course, there is no way any of this would have happened without the Hugo Boss shore team, who are each expert in their field, and have been above and beyond, putting in many 20 hour days.  You cannot say enough about these guys and their dedication to our success.

It has been a great sojourn here in Newport, irrespective of the rigging problems, and I can honestly say that the Hugo Boss has never been in better shape.  As you can see from the photos, we have been out for our first sail, and are confident in the repair.  The mast sets up beautifully, the sail shape is even better than before, and we are ready to leave this morning for New York City and our pro-am race on the 29th.

It looks like 15-20 upwind for the trip, (as expected) which should be fine, as it allows us to make good time getting there.

This whole process has been a drag for everyone involved, but positive thinking and hard work are putting us in a great position to still win the NY-Barcelona!  I am looking forward to putting on that Hugo Boss suit as we cross the finish line in first place.  With everything that the team has dealt with here, that will be the ultimate success.

It is a few days off, but it looks like a very classic North Atlantic crossing at present, riding low pressure system across in 30 knots of breeze, just what Boss loves and is set up for.  We can then tackle the Med, which is Pepe’s home turf, and I know quite well.  The race is ours to lose.

Please do not hesitate to come down to North Cove Marina in Manhattan to check out the boats.  If we are not super busy (or if you have kids along), you might just get a look around.”

Ryan Breymaier

 

 

May 26th, 2014 by admin

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The exciting news that our good friend Ryan Breymaier would be taking Alex Thomson’s place aboard Hugo Boss for the upcoming NY-Barcelona double handed race is a bit less exciting today after news came in this morning that they’ve broken their mast.  Alex, Ryan, co-skipper Pepe Ribes and preparateur Willy Altadill (Guillermo’s boy) will sail directly to Newport and, we imagine, get some of the Hall guys down to see just how much work it’ll be to get the boat ready for the June 1 departure from the Big Apple.  The boat was in plenty of breeze – well over 40 knots, according to weather files, but this is not a common failure point for Open 60 rigs.  Maybe Alex should quit running up and down the mast?  Here’s the official news:

The shore team were contacted by the boat early this morning and were informed that the Southern Spar mast is broken above the top spreader. We are relieved to announce that the four crew members on-board are safe and we have notified their families and our sponsors.

We could not have a better team on the boat to deal with this and members of the shore team are planning to meet the boat upon its arrival to Newport this weekend, and will carry out an assessment to determine if the boat can be repaired in time to enable us to take part in the New York to Barcelona race.

The broken section has been secured and the boat is able to sail with the remaining mast and they are on route to Newport RI. At the moment our intention is to make a suitable repair to allow Pepe and Ryan to take part in the race but until the boat is in port and fully assessed we cannot finalise our plans…

We will post more info once the assessment is complete.

Update from Hall Spars: Regarding the Hugo Boss mast break – we definitely appreciate the shout-out that the Hall guys will be ready to assist, but we wanted to set the record straight that the current mast was not built by Hall (it’s a 2-spreader carbon rig by Southern).

That being said, HB did contact Hall recently about doing some mast modification work for this boat, and we can indeed confirm that the Hall team will be in Newport to greet the boat upon arrival to help find a solution to get them back up and racing ASAP.

Hall did build the rig for the Hugo Boss IMOCA 60 corporate boat in 2010, which is still sailing happily in the UK.

 

May 8th, 2014 by admin

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