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Posts Tagged ‘rick warner’

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Clean Report

I’d already bailed from the 1D35 I usually race in Detroit for this weekend’s Bayview Long Distance Race, but when my wife’s plans to hold a garage sale changed an hour before getting a text from Rick Warner on Friday, I jumped at the chance to sail Rick’s ORMA 60 Arete in the historic race on Saturday.  I’d been trying to race with Rick since he bought the beastly trimaran, and a dead-calm delivery I did last month with him didn’t really fit the bill.

With a forecast of 10-15 for the 50-mile race, this one would be somewhat different, especially since my old friend Bora blew off an invitation to appear as one of Michigan’s Olympians on the U of M football field (in front of 106,000) to take the helm of the boat for this race.  And while the Bayview Race Committee gave us a start, we were an ‘unofficial’ entry and the only multihull, but no one cared – we were there to set a record, and as far as we know, we did.

An ORMA is perhaps the perfect boat for the Mackinac races; blazing fast in light air, and even faster in heavy – but for a race on the depth-limited Lake St. Clair, this truly was a case of bringing a knife to a gunfight, even with much of Arete’s core crew off doing other things.  It took us twenty minutes to get through the 8 classes of boats ahead of us, flying at 20 knots all the way to the wind farm off the Canadian Thames light, and you couldn’t ask for a less dramatic ride; furling sails and smart winch logistics make everything as smooth as the boat, and aside from one problem with the gennaker tack (that’s me hanging on the bowsprit at 15-20 knots after the fix), we didn’t leave much on the course, and while the Bayview Long Distance Race Record ain’t something that matters to more than a tiny group of people, as my (possibly) first ever race record, it mattered to me!

Our total time for the 50 mile race was actually the same as my birthday: 4/20.  While none of us can find an actual race record, we’re pretty confident we set it – our time was just under an hour and a half ahead of the fastest boat behind us, the GL70 Equation.   I uploaded some videos during the race – if you like big multihulls, you’ll like them.  Here’s my arrival, update 1, update 2, and some gorgeous slow-mo of the leeward hull streaming in the sunlight.

Rick has done a great job getting  young sailors aboard Arete in her two years in the Midwest, and his Mackinac resulted in one of the most interesting distance race video series we’ve seen in years, this one from a young videographer.  Watch the four-part series, produced by Andrew Jowett from the Port Huron Times-Herald, here. Photo from Bora Gulari.

 

September 19th, 2016 by admin

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Rick Warner’s ORMA 60 Arete (ex-Sopra) shattered her 2015 BYC-Mack record by more than an hour, beating in everything by a long, long way (as she should).  With the speedy old Windquest mothballed for the race (some of the DeVos clan will be racing cats in Harbor Springs next week), Arete was in another time zone from the rest of the fleet. Results are here.

Screen Shot 2016-07-17 at 8.01.52 PMScreen Shot 2016-07-17 at 8.01.52 PMScreen Shot 2016-07-17 at 8.01.52 PMWe’d send you to the tracker, but we’re boycotting it.  Hey Bayview, is it really necessary to require us to avow that we’re 21 years old to watch a tracker?  Listen – we get that Bell’s wants to get the exposure, and we think it’s very cool that you have a brewery – an excellent brewery – sponsoring your marquee race.  But consider the message you’re sending to the public and your own aging membership: It says, “Hey Kids: Either lie on the form, or you’re shit out of luck.”

Keep an eye on SA’s Facebook Page, we’re we’ll be doing some live stuff from the deck of the mighty trimaran during the Round Mackinac Island Race after the CYC Mack.

July 17th, 2016 by admin

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Longtime singlehander Tim Kent sent us this report from the deck of Areté, the Great Lakes’ new king of speed. It’s great to finally see a real, modern ocean racer come to freshwater sailing – even if she’s more than a decade old herself. Expect to see some records fall this summer, especially if the all-Anarchist crew can keep the skinny side up.  Head over to the team’s Facebook Page for photos, videos, and updates.

The idea of bringing an ORMA 60 trimaran to the Great Lakes was an audacious one.  There are an extremely small number of decent examples of the world-beating trimaran class left, fewer are for sale.  The closest ones are in France, and shipping one is ludicrously expensive, so a long transatlantic delivery needs to be planned and executed with all of the vagaries that such a trip can entail.

Because the boat is roughly a 60’ square, it won’t fit anywhere easy, and has to come in through the St. Lawrence Seaway – and if the boat is to be raced on the Great Lakes in the summer, it has to come in during the spring.  The early, windy, very cold spring.  Why so cold?  Because at the northernmost point of the delivery, the boat is at a latitude that is roughly 530 statute miles north of Detroit.

Screen Shot 2015-07-02 at 11.37.23 AMRick Warner has an affinity for audacious projects – his previous trimaran was the relatively audacious [modified F-31 R] Cheeky – so he dove in, acquiring the ORMA 60 Sopra in April and rechristening her Areté (from the ancient Greek, meaning “striving for excellence in all things”).  The boat made a two-part delivery from the Med to Newport, RI – including an unplanned stop in the Canary Islands.  Members of the racing crew picked her up in Newport and sailed her up over the Gaspé peninsula, down to Quebec, then through the locks on the St. Mary’s River and the Welland Canal – lifted 590 feet above sea level – to her summer home in Port Huron, Michigan.

The team’s first-year goals are simple – compete for first-to-finish in every race.  Our first race was last weekend’s Queen’s Cup, South Shore Yacht club’s annual sprint across Lake Michigan from Milwaukee, and our goal was the Sylvie Trophy for first-to-finish.  The top contenders for first to finish were a bit different from last year, as unfortunately the Max Z86 Windquest and the VO70 il Mostro were both sitting out the race, but the TP 52s and the Andrews 77 Ocean were on the line.  No matter what, we wanted to post a lusty time.

South Shore Yacht Club moves the Michigan finish for the Queen’s Cup each year; this year, the race re-visited the resort town of South Haven, making this trip 78 miles on the rhumbline.  The race starts in the early evening, with the cruising fleet starting mid-afternoon.  Our start would be with the rest of the multihulls – last – with the forecast calling for a breezy, one-legged reach across the lake.

Our new sails had the battens from our old ones installed, and with our confidence in the old sticks a bit low, we started the race with our foot not entirely on the gas.  We crossed the starting line with a reef and the J2, reaching hard at 21 to 23 knots.  After clearing the multihulls and the first two fleets, we switched to the J1.  Still not satisfied, we declared the veteran battens to be stout enough for reaching and shook the reef and Areté responded, jumping to over 25 knots.

At this point we were carving through the fleet, doing our best to minimize our impact on the boats we passed.  With the cold water temps, spray and wind chill, it was cold on deck but no one minded – after a 9,700 mile delivery, we were finally racing!  As we watched our distance to finish quickly diminish, we realized that if we were to get all seven crew a little helm time, we were going to have to start rotating fast!  After the mid-point of the lake, it began to get warmer, but the wind backed off a bit as the temps rose.  As we closed on the coast, we picked out the finish boat, which had hustled out to meet us and crossed the line in 4 hours, 30 minutes, the first boat to finish.

We nailed our goal, adding Areté’s name to the Sylvie Trophy.  We learned more about the boat – it is an absolute thrill to sail, but we have a long, long way to go before finding all her speed buttons.  In two weeks, the freshwater sailing world’s longest race will begin in Chicago; it’s the 568-mile long SuperMac, and all the big players will be on the line.  We can hardly wait.

Queen’s Cup results here.

 

July 2nd, 2015 by admin

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Arete in Gran Canaria - 2

With a world record breaking trimaran headed to the West Coast and another headed to the East Coast, longtime Michigan anarchist Rick Warner’s decided the Middle Coast needed a new toy, too.  Enter Arete, with big thanks to Rick for putting it into words for SA (and for offering us a ride next month).

As you have written, multihull sailing has reached a tipping point in the US.  When people see a tipping point taking place, they think it happened all of a sudden, when in fact it is evidence of momentum that has been building over time.  So it is with big boat multihull sailing in the US.

I was delighted to see the spectacle of the America’s Cup, the ORMA 60s and MOD 70s that are either on or heading to the West Coast, and all of the publicity around the G4.  None of this happened overnight.  The biggest names in multihull sailing, like Brian Thompson on Phaedo3 and our mutual friend Ryan Breymeier on Lending Club are currently destroying records everywhere on US-owned boats.  To me, it’s all evidence that offshore multihull sailing, popular in Europe for years, has finally found its foothold in the US.

As I told you recently, I purchased ORMA 60 ex-Sopra.  She has been christened Areté (from the Greek, meaning “striving for excellence in all things”) and is on her way to the Great Lakes.  She just arrived at Newport Shipyard after sailing across the Atlantic.  After a bit of post-crossing maintenance, my crew and I will deliver her up the Seaway to Port Huron…she will be quite a sight in the Black River!

Arete when sponsored by SopraWe are going to race her like a big Cheeky [Rick’s previous boat, a modified Corsair F31R -Ed], with a lot of the same crew and some other friends who make up an extremely experienced group of longtime multihull, offshore and solo racers – all amateurs.  All of us are doing this for the love of the sport and the challenge that comes with multihull speeds.  The boat will be in all of the iconic Great Lakes races this summer including Queen’s Cup, the Chicago to Mackinac, the SuperMac and the Port Huron to Mackinac.  We’re really looking forward to the SuperMac so we can stretch her legs in a longer race.

Areté is a tipping point of her own.  I raced, cruised and lived aboard “leaners” on the Great Lakes, in Washington state, San Francisco and more.  I logged thousands of offshore miles on deliveries and on board my own boats.  When I bought Cheeky, my interest in sailing, which had frankly had begun to wane, kicked into another gear entirely.  Cheeky is a tweaky, twitchy speed demon that rewards increasing levels of skill with increasing speed, making her a delightful challenge to sail.  After several years of this, I wanted more and Areté is all that.  The French call her “la machine folle”, which meanas ‘the crazy machine’.  After sailing her in 49 knots of wind through the Straits of Gibraltar, I find it to be very appropriate, but that’s a story for another day.  You will agree after you sail her.

Following the successful European model for which she was built, we are also offering the boat as a unique sponsorship platform who want to leverage the experience of multihull sailing.  In other words, we are looking for some baddass brands looking for a baddass marketing platform.

Check out some pics or get in touch with us via our site.  See you soon on the lakes!

May 11th, 2015 by admin

http://www.camet.com/

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