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Posts Tagged ‘rescue’

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The PR folks at Crowley’s Vessel Management department dropped a beautiful if somber photo bomb on the web last night, along with a short report of their assistance to Rainmaker last month.  Meanwhile, we’re still finishing up the crew’s own ‘lessons learned’ from the incident, which you’ll see here soon.  More from Crowley (and there’s a closer shot of Rainmaker in Crescent’s lee here).

The crew of the Crowley-managed, 393-foot, heavy lift vessel Ocean Crescent recently provided assistance to five people aboard the damaged and drifting catamaran Rainmaker during a routine transit from Progresso, Mexico, to Halifax, Canada. Following a message from the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) to render assistance, if possible, the Crowley crew onboard diverted the Ocean Crescent approximately 20 nautical miles to the west where they found Rainmaker stranded with two inoperable engines and a broken mast, which had penetrated the forward port window and destroyed the vessel’s navigational equipment.

First on scene, Ocean Crescent approached Rainmaker, pulled alongside and shielded the 55-foot sailboat from seas reaching six meters. The crew also relayed communications from the inbound USCG helicopter and search plane to the sailboat’s uninjured occupants, both of which arrived on scene about an hour after the Ocean Crescent. Once each of the sailboat’s occupants was loaded onto the helicopter, USCG dismissed Ocean Crescent from the scene, thanking the Crowley mariners for their assistance.

February 27th, 2015 by admin

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UPDATE 1: Here’s a shot of the boat just before leaving the dock.

UPDATE 2: Here’s yet another crew rescued off the East Coast this weekend, this time from a Condor 40 trimaran.  Details in the thread.

Like a well-written tragedy, the story of Reg and Jason McGlashan starts off from with a feel-good, family friendly triumph and ends with a near-death experience.  From the Newport Daily News:

The younger McGlashan has sailed since childhood from the port city of Port Macquarie, located between Brisbane and Sydney on the east coast of Australia. He first set eyes on Sedona when it appeared on eBay, the online auction site. He bought the sailboat with a winning bid of $10,000, U.S. currency.

He already had a racing boat that needed work, McGlashan acknowledged, but Sedona’s lines were too beautiful and her asking price was too good to pass up.

“I like to shop local as much as the next guy, but so many things are so much cheaper in America,” he said. “A sailboat like this back home, in the condition it was in, would go for $150,000 American, at least. New, we’re talking $300,000, easily.”

Having spent months here renovating the ‘classic plastic’ N/M 43′ Sedona from Carroll Marine, completely done with all the insane snow,  the McGlashans set off from Rhode Island into the teeth of this weekend’s blizzard.  And a day later, with the sails in tatters, the engine broken, and no options left, the boys in orange hoisted the father/son crew through near hurricane-force winds and blinding snow, into the waiting arms of a MH-60 Jayhawk crew.

Another nice one from the USCG.  Full rescue story here, with pics. And a thread to talk about it here.

 

February 16th, 2015 by admin

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“The man bought the 14-foot dinghy on Saturday and then set off on his 3,500 mile voyage across the Atlantic…not wearing a life jacket, his boat had no lights and his only navigational aid was a street map of Southampton.”

Seems like a good kit bag for most major voyages, right?  But wait – that’s not all.  “He had a passport containing a US visa, hot dogs, beans and a bag of biscuits.” Hot dogs?  Beans and biscuits?  Sounds like a fine transatlantic menu, as long as he’s alone!

The Bulgarian man was not interesting in whatever the RNLI was selling. “When we reached the gentleman he didn’t want us there, he wanted to carry on his way,” refusing assistance for 45 minutes, after which “the crew dragged him on to their boat and took him to shore.”

We can’t be the only ones who really, really wanted to see how far he could get.  If anyone runs into this guy, let him know that next time, Sailing Anarchy fund your YellowBrick tracker, an EPIRB, and some extra provisions…

Watch the video for the full ‘rescue’ and thanks to Brad T for the heads up.

 

August 18th, 2014 by admin

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One of the most interesting things to come out of an otherwise uneventful Moth Worlds was their sharing of this poignant story about Hayling Rescue’s Frank Dunster.  For an explanation of this enigmatic subject, we go to the film’s co-creator, Jack Pollington.  If you’re motivated to contribute to such a wonderful effort, hit up Hayling Rescue on Facebook, and for more on the producers, go here.

This was a short documentary created by Alex Forbes and me as part of coursework for Farnham Film School.  Frank runs a completely voluntary, non-profit life saving operation from Hayling Island Sailing Club.  He is a vital part of what keeps that very busy and active club safe and running,  year by year, and in thanks for that, the members of the club contribute to Hayling Rescue’s upkeep in an annual fundraiser.

 

August 15th, 2014 by admin

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Clipper RTW team Derry-Londonderry-Doire show their successful recovery of Andrew Taylor after a wave knocked him off the boat during a 35-knot squall about halfway across the Pacific.  The 90-minute rescue was compounded by hail and breaking seas, but Taylor’s drysuit and PFD made it a fairly textbook – if slow – rescue.  No word on what the holdup was, or whether the Clipper crew was wearing a PLRB; official news here and thanks to Richard for the heads up.

 

March 31st, 2014 by admin

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