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Posts Tagged ‘paul larsen’

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Longtime SA’ers will know of our love affair with Sailrocket’s Paul Larsen, and our favorite ultra-high speed sailor, offshore racer, C-Class star, and Antarctic explorer is firing up the Sailrocket team for a new and extremely ambitious new project – a truly ocean-capable, highly stable, offshore foiler.  And whether he succeeds or fails might just depend on you. Here’s an note from Paul just for you SAers:

Paul LarsenI left some space in my life after the record (and Shackleton gig) on purpose to see what would fill it. I didn’t want to go out and say “we will do this and that” just to satisfy the “what next” crowd. We had a lot of ideas and have run hot and cold on a few of them. Of course I was constantly reflecting on what had happened over the past 10-12 years with the Sailrocket project and was trying to work out in my own head what it was all about. It did humour me that people would often ask why I’m doing it or question its purpose, but if you asked the same people what’s the purpose of professional ball sports (tennis for example), most people have never considered it and therefore don’t have an answer. The truth is that they have never really thought about it; “just runnin’ with the herd, man”.

We all do it to some extent, but what I like about our little speed sailing corner of the sport is that not only do you get to compete and demonstrate sporting attributes, you also get to develop the sport technically – fiddling with the genetics to improve the breed.  Whether we can do it in a useful and meaningful way remains to be seen, but it is a big part of our motivation.

So here we were, as new custodians of this technology and know-how that just took our chosen passion – speed sailing – to a whole new level.  Something which was previously just a theory has proven itself to not only be real, but vastly superior.  Many people focused on the impractical aspects of the boat rather than what it was designed to showcase.  For us it’s more a case of one thing at a time, and now we have shown the performance potential of the concepts, the next step should be to show how it can be applied in more useful ways.

I have spent a long time going over the new concept as I am pretty sceptical of new concepts myself, but the potential of this one keeps shining through that healthy scepticism. We’re not going to release the numbers just yet, but the stuff coming out of our new concept’s VPPs are pretty special, hard to fault and demand our ongoing interest.  Trying to apply our stability concepts to a practical offshore boat has lead to some interesting configurations, and once again, we have had to confront some big issues head on in order for it to be viable; exactly our process when overcoming cavitation en route to a new record.  VSR2 was a very efficient and effective ‘tool’ for developing and proving a point, and there was no ‘fat’ on the bone with that project. She did an astounding job, with almost decimal accuracy, with a small team on a tight budget. Once the job was done she was simply hosed off and put away in her 40′ container with barely a scratch. Whilst the end speed was great, our ability to accomplish a goal in this fashion is our real advantage.  There is the potential to do some pretty big stuff offshore at the moment for a fraction of the cost of an AC team; probably more around the price of a budget VOR campaign, and if you liked what we did before then you will probably love where we are going next.

The challenge now is to see if we have the credibility and ability to muster the required level of resources. If we can, well that little one-way freak that you think only lives in the rarefied flat waters off a sandy African town may be about to land square in the middle of your own ‘pond’ and start doing its freaky thing – in all directions, on any day.  If the numbers translate into reality as well as they did with VSR2 then, change will be upon us all.

The Sailrocket story isn’t over and the road ahead beckons.  If you have some specific questions for some unique content then fire away in the thread.

 

July 15th, 2014 by admin

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If you watch one documentary this year, make it this one (including Part Two and Part Three), and then get into the Sailing Anarchy forums and ask the trip’s official navigator your own questions on the most excellent Sailing Anarchy thread.  You are, however, warned:  The thread has numerous spoilers, so we advise you to first watch this riveting documentary at the above links or via your own favorite video source and go to the forum with your curiosity afterwards.  Long time Anarchist and a guy who should already be called “Sir” – World Speed Record holder and inspirational envelope-pusher Paul Larsen has already answered quite a few good questions in the thread; add your own and he’ll get to those too.  Trust us – this one is worth every second of your time.

 

January 28th, 2014 by admin

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With ISAF predictably and  lamely passing over Paul Larsen and the Vestas Sailrocket team for the World Sailor award, Larso and his video team finally felt it safe to drop the profanity-laced ‘reality reel’ of Paul’s astonishing 65-knot record run on us today.  It’s a year to the day since they broke the record, and what many don’t realize is that Larso and his team moved the sport’s ‘absolute top speed’ further in one month that it had moved between 1991 and 2012.  Let’s repeat that, because it is worth it: The Sailrocket raised the bar from 55 knots to 65 knots in one year.  It took from 1991 to 2010 to get to 55 knots from 45.

Simply amazing, and kudos to the team for releasing this re-edited, very emotional, and very real highlight reel.  For best effect, click on HD and run it on the biggest screen you have.  Got a question for Paul or the Sailrocket team?  Congratulate him again in the thread and he’ll probably answer whatever you got.

 

November 25th, 2013 by admin

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Mad Men

It doesn’t matter how lazy, nepotistic, incompetent, or corrupt you think ISAF is; its World Sailor Of The Year award is still the biggest honor that can be bestowed upon a sailor for his or her performance over the course of a year.  So it’s kind of a big deal (even though you win some shitty mid-range watch as an award).  The public nominated the slate of potential awardees, but of course the only voting happens at this week’s ISAF meeting in the bastion of yachting that is Muscat, Oman.

We think it would be a miscarriage of justice if anyone besides Paul Larsen wins the men’s award this year.  To so utterly destroy the most important record in the sport (by 20%!), and then go on to sail a recreation of Shackleton’s voyage weeks later, is just incredible.  Adding to all that is Larsen’s undeniable stature as one of sailing’s best communicators and cheerleaders; he does more for the sport every time he gets in front of a news camera (and it happens a lot) than any other talking head.

Francois Gabard’s accomplishment winning the Vendee at age 29 could have landed him the award, but ISAF delegates don’t like the French; you’ll note that no French man has ever won.  Besides, he’ll get one when he breaks Francis Joyon’s solo RTW record with his new boat in a couple of years.  As for the rest of them, Heineken’s accomplishments are awesome, but in a discipline that’s in its infancy with extremely inconsistent competition.  Williams wins the WMRT in a year when much of his best competition is racing catamarans.   And Matt Belcher had some kind of good results in something called a 470, whatever that is.  Go Larso!

Pro-Choice

For the women, the choice is even easier; Deneen Demourkas dominated the Farr 30 Worlds, becoming the first 3-time World Champion in the class, beating some of the world’s top male owner/drivers and tacticians in the process.  She also brought the class back from the brink of disaster, leading it to new growth in the US as well as Southern Europe and Scandinavia.

Competing with Deneen for the award is a Omani girl whose sole accomplishment seems to be that she is female and a sailor (quite an accomplishment in arabia, but still), another course-racing kiteboarder (same family name as Johnny, same reason she shouldn’t win), and a couple of girls that got some kind of good results in something called a 470, whatever that is.

So there you have it:  The two sailors that should, without a doubt, win this year’s mid-range luxo-watch.

And all joking aside, every one of these nominated sailors wins our respect.

 

November 12th, 2013 by admin

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