alibi side banner

west system fp banner ad 1 15

velocitek banner 12 16

farr banner ad 8 1

karver ad 1 14

dry uv ad 2.png

hh banner green

ner banner 3 24

c tech 9 22

seascape banner

pyi banner ad

csprit banner 2

vela harken

fish fp 6 15

schwab tower ad 1 15

brooklin boatyard

lemon and line


fish wind top 10 20

star banner

hh top banner

velocitek top banner



alibi top banner ad

mc 38 31 banner

mauri 3 1 SA-Top-Rotate

oceanvolt 11 13 banner

tan 66 banner 11 20

Posts Tagged ‘Olympics’

Article Separator

Screen Shot 2015-10-26 at 2.37.21 PM

What’s the latest stunt from America’s fastest skipper and prospective 2016 Olympian Bora Gulari and his Nacra 17 crew Solvig Sayre?  You’ll have to check back later this week for the video that shows it all, unless you’re one of the lucky few headed to tonight’s fundraiser at Harken World HQ in Pewaukee.  Go and like their page here, and if you’re at the auction (for some crazy prizes) or at this weekend’s big auction and party at Bayview, bid big!


October 26th, 2015 by admin

Article Separator

Screen Shot 2015-08-24 at 9.58.56 AMAs Mr. Clean works on the report of his 8-day trip hanging with the US Sailing Team Sperry, combing through the pollution of Guanabara Bay, and the endless ass parade that are Copacabana and Ipanema Beach, we figured we’d share some information with you that explains why we don’t ask Olympic Athletes whether they ‘feel comfortable’ competing in nasty and dangerous water.  Because around half of them would literally choose death in five years if it guaranteed them a medal.  From a New York Times piece on doping comes this description of the Goldman Dilemma, and here’s a pertinent study.

There’s a well-known survey in sports, known as the Goldman Dilemma. For it, a researcher, Bob Goldman, began asking elite athletes in the 1980s whether they would take a drug that guaranteed them a gold medal but would also kill them within five years. More than half of the athletes said yes. When he repeated the survey biannually for the next decade, the results were always the same. About half of the athletes were quite ready to take the bargain.

Only recently did researchers get around to asking nonathletes the same question. In results published online in February, 2009 in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, exactly 2 of the 250 people surveyed in Sydney, Australia, said that they would take a drug that would ensure both success and an early death. “We were surprised,” James Connor, Ph.D., a lecturer at the University of New South Wales and one of the study’s authors, said in an e-mail message. “I expected 10-20 percent yes.” His conclusion, unassailable if inexplicable, is that “elite athletes are different from the general population, especially on desire to win.”

Check back later in the week for Sailing Anarchy’s carefully researched and written onclusion on the water problem.  And in the meantime, let’s give new ISAF CEO Peter Sowery some props for at least getting a threat to move the racing on record.

August 24th, 2015 by admin

Article Separator


While there’s still plenty of International Star racing around the globe, the end of the Olympic career for the venerable keelboat means plenty of extra hulls laying about, and up in Hamburg, Germany, they came up with a great re-use for a pretty hull with no mast; it’s now a launch for the local club.  Pics courtesy of Norddeutscher Regatta Verein Hamburg (NRV).  Here’s an even prettier pic from above.

August 22nd, 2015 by admin

Article Separator

UPDATE: Associated Press reporter Stephen Wade did a little more digging after reading the SA piece below. His update is here.

You won’t see it in any official ISAF or IOC report, but the first major casualty (that we know about, anyway) of the Guanabara Bay pollution epidemic is now in a local hospital.  One of the top light-air RS:X specialists, Korean boardsailor Wonwoo Choo, was rushed to an ambulance yesterday afternoon with high fever, vomiting, chills, and dehydration.  More from “Danny OK”, and please share his post on the IOC and ISAF Facebook pages as many times as you can.  Only the most unrelenting pressure can force change against the tide of corruption, laziness, incompetence, and downright apathy, and only when Rio understands that this scandal may kill off what is left of their dwindling tourism industry will the local government do something about it.  Here’s Danny’s post:

More than 10 years of life-time effort can be destroyed in one day!  This is not an emergency situation, but it’s very disappointing.  He has been sick since last night with a high fever, vomiting and coldness, and he is now fully dehydrated.

It seems he got infected from virus somewhere in the racing site which is supposed to be safe and clean as an Olympic venue.  I hope this wouldn’t happen again not only for us, but for all sailors who compete on the same play ground.

Additionally, I hope IOC and ISAF must consider how the safety issue will be improved for the next year.

We may not able to clear all the issues, but we could minimize the risks.


August 19th, 2015 by admin

Article Separator

Screen Shot 2015-08-16 at 7.11.29 PMWe may not have come down to Brazil specifically to investigate the water pollution problems, but the situation is inescapable, and yesterday’s discovery of an open sewage outfall less than 50 feet from the main Olympic Sailing Center launch ramp was, well, shocking.  Local authorities panicked and sent over an oil containment crew with a floating boom…but that ain’t oil, and the inside of the Olympic harbor is now half water, half poo.  It’s one thing for a huge 3rd world city to have sewage problems, and our final report from Brazil will get deep into a situation which is neither uncommon nor surprising in a Latin American metropolis, but the level of incompetence required to have thousands of gallons of untreated waste flowing in the one place that every sailor touches every day, and that every reporter sees every morning?  It simply defies belief.

And the hits keep on coming; a 5-man media team was held at gunpoint and robbed of cameras and phones while covering the cycing test event yesterday, the same day hundreds of thousands of protestors – including tens of thousands on Copacabana and Ipanema – blocked major roads across Brazil while calling for the impeachment or military ouster of recently elected president Dilma Roussef.  Think American politics are messy?  She’s got an 8% approval rating…

Screen Shot 2015-08-17 at 9.52.18 AMOn a much more positive note, the US Sailing Team Sperry seems to be continually improving, with a good start in the Laser and Radial, and a great start in the 470 (and a seemingly healthy team, barring a few bruises).  The US currently holds second place in three classes, in fleets that are largely the same as they’ll be next year.  Peaking early, or a sign of great things to come?  We’re on the ground to find the answer.  Listen to yesterday’s interview with 470 chicks Bri and Annie here, and watch these pages for more.  Test Event Results here.

Onne Van Der Wal photo of new dad Stu McNay and Dave Hughes.

August 17th, 2015 by admin

Article Separator

Screen Shot 2015-07-30 at 10.41.09 AMFor almost two years we have been railing against the ridiculous state of affairs at Rio’s Olympic sailing venue, but official reactions from ISAF, the IOC and pretty much every other organization with an interest has been to plunge their heads deeply into sand.  We’ve wondered how long they could go on without meaningful action, but a report published today may change all that.

Despite multiple reports that Rio 2016 officials have already failed on the ‘guarantee’ they made on the water quality of the olympic sailing and rowing venues for the 2016 games, local politicians are still disputing the science with bullshit stunts like this one, and credibility challenged statements like last month’s from Rio2016 organizing committee spokesman Mario Andrada.  Adrada said that Rio would “guarantee safe competition and we will guarantee the health of the athletes,” although it’s pretty clear that a guarantee from the Rio2016 Committee is worth about as much as a bucketfull of the shit at the water’s edge in Guanabara.  And remember: They’ve already told us there’s no way in hell they’ll change the venue to a safer one…because dustbuster boats.

While the questionable value of Rio2016′s ‘guarantees’ is fairly obvious, quantifiable scientific data on just how nasty the water is was not; most national teams funded their own independent water quality tests, but judging from the official zeal with which those test results were guarded, there was some shit in there that no team wanted the public to see.

Those guarding the results have just learned what happens when you’re a little too good at hiding the truth, because the Associated Press got motivated enough to find the truth to spend a small fortune on it.

AP commissioned four rounds of testing in each of the three Olympic water venues and off Ipanema Beach.  Their summary? “Not one water venue [is] safe for swimming or boating, according to global water experts.”

Multiple national officials over the past year have told us that their investigations were ‘inconclusive’ or ‘showed manageable levels’ or some other crock of shit designed to avoid making waves, so it was surprising to see such unquestionable lab results from the AP tests, which:

found high counts of active and infectious human adenoviruses, which multiply in the intestinal and respiratory tracts of people. These are viruses that are known to cause respiratory and digestive illnesses, including explosive diarrhea and vomiting, but can also lead to more serious heart, brain and other diseases.

The concentrations of the viruses in all tests were roughly equivalent to that seen in raw sewage — even at one of the least-polluted areas tested, the Copacabana Beach, where marathon and triathlon swimming will take place and where many of the expected 350,000 foreign tourists may take a dip.

Perhaps most importantly, the test results viral discoveries call into question all national teams’ strategies of disease prevention.  Basically, you’re going to get sick if you spend any amount of time in the water or catching spray.  From the report:

Kristina Mena, a U.S. expert in risk assessment for waterborne viruses, examined the AP data and estimated that international athletes at all water venues would have a 99 percent chance of infection if they ingested just three teaspoons of water — though whether a person will fall ill depends on immunity and other factors…Viruses can enter the body through the mouth, eyes, any orifice, or even a small cut.

The certainty of infection, and the risk of much nastier bugs they didn’t test for, creates a new problem for every official associated with the event; they can no longer claim that death/disease/complications/infection wasn’t foreseeable for their competitors.  And under the laws of quite a few nations, that means they may be liable in court if and when the shit hits the fan.  SA’s Legal Research Department isn’t sure whether this liability could extend to the directors or CEOs of national sailing teams, but if there’s one thing that can motivate action when even concern for the health and safety of competitors can’t, it’s the threat of multimillion dollar lawsuits.

One of the few good eggs at ISAF – Head of Competitions Alastair Fox – made some noise about moving the venue back in April, but was quickly silenced.  Will Alastair or anyone else at ISAF have the balls to do something about it, especially now that they are properly on notice about just how bad it is?

Read the full report here, and send the IOC your thoughts via email.

Thread here.

July 30th, 2015 by admin

Article Separator

With so many Olympic sailors having grown up as part of the SA community, we’re especially pissed about the continuing mess in Guanabara Bay, Brazil. Longtime sailing cheerleader Glenn McCarthy is staying on top of it with one smart solution; we pulled this piece from Chicago Now.


  • Years ago, a sailing event in Springfield, IL ran out of water in their lake due to drought, within two weeks, they had it rescheduled at Lake Geneva, WI some 250 miles away.
  • People who sail iceboats retain flexibility as a way of life.  A few years ago their World’s Championship was scheduled to be held in Minnesota, they held out hoping for cold to freeze their lakes, with less than a week to go, they shifted their World’s Championship to the Finger Lakes region of New York, 1,000+ miles away.

There are at least two open ocean venues where major regattas in Brazil have been held, one is 2 hours, 75 miles, away from Rio, another 4 hours away.  Having the sailing portion of the Olympics/Paralympics away from the host city is not uncommon.  In the 1996 Atlanta, GA Games, the sailing venue was 250 miles away in Savannah, GA.  At the 2008 Bejing, China Games sailing was held in Qingdao, China some 430 miles away.  In the 2012 London Games, sailing was in Weymouth, England about 135 miles away.

Sure moving the Olympics and Paralympics might be a tad more work, but there is over one year to do it.  That is ample time.  Rather than scrambling for housing for the competitors and race officials, a cruise ship can be rented and anchored off the beach.  A cruise ship is a floating city and can provide housing, meals, medical facility and lighters/tenders for shuttling people back to the shore.  A cruise ship was rented recently for housing for a convention in San Francisco recently.  Security can be done with a couple of Navy boats around the cruise ship.  Problem solved.

Read on.


April 14th, 2015 by admin

Article Separator

The anonymous piece We Suck published earlier this week contained a little tidbit you might have glossed over; the end of Paralympic sailing.

On 31 January, the International Paralympic Committee announced that Sailing got the boot from the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.  The RYA immediately posted a statement decrying the decision and announcing their willingness to help try to reverse it.  US Sailing published President Tom Hubbell’s willingness to do the same.  Yet the reasons behind this big move remained largely secret – until ISAF published their own response nearly a week after the fact.  As usual, ‘getting ahead of the story’ to ISAF means something different to ISAF than the rest of the world.

For those who delight in ISAF’s lunacy (and it’s been getting almost laughably dysfunctional lately), have a look at the ISAF statement.  ISAF takes over the IFDS in November, and two months later, the IPC gives sailing the ease.  Coincidence, or yet another example of ISAF’s ‘reverse midas touch’?  You know how it works: Everything they touch turns to shit!

The ISAF Disabled Sailing Committee (IFDS) is profoundly disappointed by the decision of the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) to exclude sailing from the Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games.
IFDS responded in a timely and comprehensive manner to queries from IPC, with details of sailors that participate regularly in international regattas or national championships, on Paralympic boats. IFDS ensures an extensive quadrennial program of international competitions replicating the Olympic Program organized by the International Sailing Federation (ISAF), including ISAF Sailing World Cup. IFDS sanctions and organizes yearly Combined World Championships in the Paralympic classes.
Development has resulted in the regular addition of new countries to competitive sailing. The process of merging with ISAF (with a membership of 139 Member National Authorities) was completed in November of 2014, with the main aim of opening a whole new field for the development of disabled sailing. During the period of pre-merging, ISAF always respected the independence of IFDS decisions. Through ISAF’s development programmes, worldwide participation initiatives and event structure, the opportunities for disabled sailing are better than ever before.


February 5th, 2015 by admin

Article Separator