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Posts Tagged ‘olympic’

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Moth, skiff, and Red Bull Youth AC Anarchist Ian Andrewes checks in from his Nacra 17 action in Rio after 2 weeks of ‘the most effective training camp he’s ever been part of’.  It was also a trip that featured the disturbing sights of toxic sludge, a navy burial at sea right off the harbor mouth, and a fireworks display that sent a yacht club’s members fleeing for their lives; in other words, a typical month in Rio. We dig Ian’s take on the dilemmas of an Olympic trialler and we hope you do too.  Thank him over here, or over here.

When I first came down to Brazil in August after a last-minute decision, it was to compete in the AqueceRio Olympic Test Event. Everything was moving quickly and it wasn’t until my hour-long cab ride back to the airport that I found myself looking out the window, realizing I hadn’t spent enough time in this place. I didn’t understand what made Rio so unique or the way it manages to stay on just this side of total madness. How could I describe it to my friends and family?

I’d get another chance when we came back down this month, and I was determined to learn this place better and try to decide how I truly feel about the controversial waters Guanabara Bay. The Bay has been called one of the most beautiful places in the world, with absolutely perfect sailing conditions, and it’s been described as one of the most polluted and horrendously disgusting bodies of water in the world, completely inappropriate for any waterborne activity.  And both are correct.

My first day back this trip, one of first things I noticed was the lack of trash in the water compared to last summer; conditions that had required a rudder or board cleaning every 50 meters then.   Much can be attributed to the odd garbage scows, roaming the water like giant aquatic Roombas and scooping up everything in their path, including the odd junior in an Opti.  It struck me as a wonderful improvement, but then I started to notice the water color – not the brown of the typical estuarine bay, but the thick, particle-choked haze of the untreated sewage flowing directly into our racing area.

I do believe this place is seriously sick. The waters are not just dirty; they are toxic and poisonous. Every day thousands of dead fish have been washing up on the beaches like its the apocalypse – their rotting bodies adding to the already pungent aroma of raw sewage at low tide. The ones that aren’t quite dead flop around in an epileptic dance of rainbow-hued oily sludge and sand right until their death.

I have noticed a decrease in the amount of garbage in the Bay, but there’s still plenty of work to be done, and I think all the sailors are hoping their organizations keep the pressure up.

Rio is a strange place, difficult to compare easily to other cities I know. Favelas rule the politics despite being made up of the poorest squatters and the nastiest criminals. Some people seem to pay taxes, but most don’t.  In Niteroi, just across the bay, you find multimillion dollar houses along the waterfront, immediately adjacent to squatting families living in shacks made of driftwood, corrugated steel, and dock scraps.  But of course the shacks are loaded with electricity, satellite TV and running water courtesy of the welfare system…All of this disparity and more yet nobody seems all that disgruntled.

In fact, most locals I’ve met seem generally quite happy. Maybe they complain about a politician’s decision or about the bad traffic, but the conversation never seems to carry on past that. Maybe something in the water gives these people such a cheerful disposition.

We’re all hoping that the Olympics will help to shine spotlight the environmental issues in Rio, and that the public attention leads to improved sewage treatment and pollution control, not for us but for the people of Rio.  They deserve better.

As sailors, we need to promote and encourage change that extends far beyond this event.. I will keep coming back to this place as my captivation with the scenery and the strangely pleasant locals only makes me want to see change sooner. I hope each trip down to this gauche city in Brazil will show that steps are being made in the right direction and that it’s not too late.  I’ll keep you posted.


December 24th, 2014 by admin

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hans fogh passingIn life, if you are lucky, you will meet a person who changes your life; someone who takes you under their wing and helps you to be a better person; someone who makes a difference.  Today we lost one of those people, today we lost Hans Fogh.  My condolences and thoughts are with his family as they mourn his passing.

Hans touched the lives of many people, sailors and non-sailors alike, all over the world.  His sailing career was impressive with many Olympic appearances that included winning a silver and bronze medal; America’s Cup; World championships wins in Flying Dutchman, Soling, Etchels and many local championship wins in a variety of classes.  I was fortunate enough to have raced with Hans in Solings, Stars, as well as on my 8 Metre.  I was also fortunate to have worked for Hans for many years where I learned many things about myself, things that Hans could see and helped me to realize.  ”Do it right, and do it right away.” was what Hans would say.  ”There are no such things as problems, only solutions” was another saying of his.  Those of us who called him friend also know many of his “Hansisms” for which he was famous.  Many of us would try to immatate him and in our best Danish accent,  ”Once you have boats speed you have nothing to worry about!” is always the first one that comes to mind.

I will remember Hans as a person who made a difference in this world; he made a difference in my life and I will be forever greatful for what he taught me and the opportunities he gave me.

Fair winds and slack tides Hans.  Rest in Peace.

-John Mitchele

Add your thoughts and/or stories about this inspirational Canadian mentor and sailor.

March 17th, 2014 by admin

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