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Posts Tagged ‘new york times’

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As usual, we are half a year late, but at long last, the soon-to-be-world-famous Sailing Anarchy Podcast has begun!

Our first episode was the result of a late night flight to Boston, a trudge to the shores of Naragansett Bay (via the liquor store), and an decreasingly sober 3-hour conversation with the always interesting Chris Museler.

New York Times Sailing Correspondent Chris Museler has spent his life on the water, and he taps into his lifetime of racing, crewing, boat work, and his passion for the sea and for sailing every day of his life. A champion match racer, college sailor, and now foiling mothie, Museler’s articles in ‘The Grey Lady”, seen by millions around the world, do as much to bridge the gap between the niche sport and the mainstream as any other person or program.

Chris and Clean talk about everything sailing: Current events (racing and tourism in Cuba, America’s Cup craziness, moth and cat racing, the Vendee Globe); origin stories, mentoring the next generation of sailing, and much, much more.

We’ll be publishing one new podcast every day until Sunday, and we hope to drop at least one a week after that.  Got any ideas for a podcast guest?  Let Clean know. And if you get your podcasts via iTunes or another app, sit tight for a few days while we get the necessary approvals from Apple.  A new day in Sailing has begun!



May 25th, 2016 by admin

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OCEANS-CHASE-08-master1050Even the most corporate-raiding sailor still considers himself something of a conservationist; the time we all spend amongst nature’s beauty means we pay more attention than most to the problems facing our natural world.  But to the overwhelming majority of sailors, seamanship and respect for other vessels is at least as powerful as our love of nature, which is why there’s such a love/hate relationship between sailors and the activists at Sea Shepherd.

Here at SA, we are overwhelmgly in favor of what they do. If world governments took more responsibility for the stewardship of our oceans, there wouldn’t be a need for the Sea Shaepards, but they aren’t, so we can thank this intrepid organization for their incredible efforts.

We don’t need to get too deep into who they are; the Whale Wars show and this story show just how agitating Paul Watson and his groupies can be.

New York Times Correspondent Ian Urbina shared a brilliant story this morning that shows the other side of the organization, though – the side that stands up for those who cannot.  It’s a story of a ten thousand mile chase through squalls, storms, and the Southern Ocean.  The cast of characters includes ships named after a Simpsons creator and a game show host and the world’s most wanted pirate fishing captain, and it all ends with a mysterious sinking and the hunters rescuing the hunted.  We’re not even going to give you an excerpt; the article is the single best piece of maritime journalism we’ve seen this year, so go over to the NYT site and check it out right now.

Photo from Simon Ager/Sea Shepherd Global. Title inspiration comes from the realization that a good song can become great when sung by a hot sailing chick.


July 28th, 2015 by admin

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After our massive disappointment in the Robert Redford stupid-fest ‘All Is Lost‘, our ears pricked up when the New York Times Sunday Mag printed a long and brilliantly written piece on a NY fisherman’s near-death experience last Sunday.  Like Redford, the NYTMAG has millions of fans, and the story has been the most clicked-on thing over at for 8 days now.  So what’s the problem?

Author Paul Tough, recent author of a book touting how ‘Grit’ helps children succeed, romanticized moron fisherman John Aldridge so heavily in an effort to make a good story that he gave millions of fisherman – most of whom still haven’t heard of personal EPIRBs or sleep deprivation – hope that somehow, their ‘grit’ and a good pair of sea boots are enough to get them past working practices that make their job one of the most dangerous in the entire world of employment.  We understand how an author might want to leave this out of his story; just like in the Redford moronopic (or any one of ten thousand hack-n-slash movies), if a tragedy is easily avoided but for ignorance or hubris, it’s hard to cheer for the protagonist.

The Anarchists are already on it, but so was outspoken safety consultant (and ex USCG SAR-dude) Mario Vittone, who published a snarky response to the piece on Thursday called ‘Trying Very Hard To Die”.  It ain’t the first time Mario and SA have agreed on something, and we consider his piece on kids and drowning from 2010 to be required reading for every parent on the planet.  Here are his ‘five responses’ to the ‘inescapable danger’ that, according to the Times, today’s commercial fishermen face.  Hit GCaptain for the full article.

1. Never work alone on the deck of an open boat while 40 miles offshore when the boat is on autopilot.

2. If you are going to work alone on the open deck of a boat while 40 miles offshore in the dark, consider wearing a life jacket.

3. If you go offshore for a living, consider spending about $275 on a Personal EPIRB.

4. Try to sleep more than zero hours every 24.

5. If you work on a boat where one person is awake while the rest of the crew sleeps, then 1. Reconsider that arrangement, and 2. Spend five dollars on an alarm clock

January 6th, 2014 by admin

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