west system fp banner ad 1 15

diab big

pyi vendee ad

pyi-kiwi-12-16

Posts Tagged ‘Gunboat’

Article Separator

Big Pimpin’

After a complicated 2016, Gunboat is back with a vengeance, and they open up 2017 with a Caribbean get-together of Gunboats that includes a head-to-head war between two of the most turboed luxury cats ever splashed!

In the above video you’ll see the beastly and beautiful Extreme H2O, the queen of West Coast Gunboats and the fastest multihull in the Transpac.  The last (and by far, the quickest) of the Gunboat 66 line, the burgundy and green mile muncher is transiting Panama tomorrow from Pacific enroute St. Maarten for some relaxing sailing and prepping at the Heineken before the battle of the BVI begins.

Double Melges 32 World Champion Jason Carroll’s all-conquering Gunboat 62 Elvis easily owns the East Coast Champ title in Gunboat land, and has put a similar amount of hot rod performance into his now-teenaged silver G62.  Carroll’s well-oiled multiple world champ, moth, and sportboat crew knows the BVIs like the back of their hands, and they’ll be looking to represent the land of Tom Brady against the interlopers from the Republic of California.

It all goes down at the BVI Spring Regatta at the end of March, where Elvis and Extreme will join the turbo 60’s Flow and Arethusa as well as Momentum and a couple of TBAs for the biggest Gunboat fleet of the season.  Extreme will hope that her extensive modifications and the racing knowledge of VPLP principals Vincent and Xavier as well as a few Gunboat ringers will give her the edge…

Extreme is now for sale, so if you’re looking for one of the fastest and sexiest cruising boats ever assembled, and you’re the kind of owner that appreciates a boat whose kinks have been worked out in excruciating details, let Nils at Gunboat know so you can schedule a closer look.

If you’re puzzled by the title of this piece, get some gangsta in ya.

February 10th, 2017 by admin

Article Separator

Bankruptcy_monopolyGunboat USA’s is well-documented for the multihull sector.  Hall Spars just reportedly sent out the official notices of theirs, showing that even the world’s best racing spar builder isn’t immune.  Hathaway Reiser shows that sailmakers – even from the 1800s – can’t hold it together.  Brewer’s Yacht Yard seems to have sort-of saved itself by selling to a marina holding company.  And now, Navtec USA gets on the list of shuttered American sailing outfits, with at least one Anarchist warning that ‘another unnamed northeast raceboat building company…will likely be shuttering their doors soon.’

Fortunately, we have God to thank for the bounty that is soon to come.  Everyone, hold your breath…and….GO!

February 9th, 2017 by admin

Article Separator

Screen Shot 2017-01-12 at 9.45.06 AM

SORC once again delivers on one of the quickest races in the land, this time, a recordbreaker.  From Chris Woolsey (and go here for more great photos from Marco Oquendo and the SORC media team):

Every so often, the weather gods deliver the famous conditions that bring people back to the Ft. Lauderdale to Key West Race year after year after year. For starters, winter storms up north usually have folks looking to points south by the time the new year rolls around. South Florida and the warm waters of the Gulfstream always provide a welcome place to thaw out. Couple that with the South Florida winter cold front cycle of a new blast of NE breeze every few days, which allow high speeds on nice waves down and around the bend of the Florida Keys to the Happy Place known as Key West, and you have a recipe for something more fun than shoveling snow and crossing items off of the honey-do list.

So it goes to figure that those blasting conditions would coincide with the race date roughly every other year, delivering racers to Key West overnight as quickly as (I Dream of) Jeannie can fold her arms, blink and say “Pepe’s!” As is sometimes the case, those conditions were a bit overdue, with the last all-out downwind romp coming in 2007. Those who made it for the 2017 running, hosted as always by Lauderdale Yacht Club and Storm Trysail Club, finally got a treat.

As a result, David and Peter Askew, and their all-star crew (including AC legend Marco Constant, Star world champ Phil Trinter, Artie Means, Ralf Steitz, Chris Larson, and half the Alvimedica VOR team) on the Reichel Pugh 74 Wizard romped across the finish line in record time, and pushed Carrera’s 2005 monohull record run to second-best by a few minutes. Jason Carroll’s warhorse Gunboat 62 “Elvis”, with Anderson Reggio navigating, crossed a few minutes later to take the overall quickest time (thanks to a later multihull class start), but never threatened Stars & Stripes record pace of last century. The happy crew revelled in letting the big cat get out and really stretch her legs in the fresh conditions.

The rest of the fleet is still rolling in and we may yet see some surprises in the results. Hook in, hold on and stand by.

 

January 12th, 2017 by admin

Article Separator

gunboat-5701-vaivai-1

Big Pimpin’

Our long history with sailing’s premium luxury catamaran brand means we’re pretty stoked to see how quickly Grand Large Yachting has brought Gunboat back from the brink.  While we’ll need to wait a while to see the just-announced, all-new VPLP-designed GB68 hit the water, this shot of the new Gunboat 57 VaiVai sending it hard in Newport last weekend sends a loud and clear message: Gunboat is back, and better than ever.  With VaiVai hitting 17 knots upwind and 26 downwind last week without even letting her off her chain yet, she’s already exceeding expectations.  Compared to the 55, the new boat is 10% lighter – nearly 1.5 tons – all while sporting major upgrades:  An all-carbon interior, a gorgeous, high-modulus rotating Southern Spar, deep daggerboards, and amidships engines.  Throw in air conditioning, a washer/dryer, and a gourmet galley, and you have a full fledged Caribbean dream that just happens to be faster than a new TP52.

A personal note from our editorial staff: We visited with the management of Grand Large several years ago in the south of France, and they are an impressive bunch with a serious passion for yachting. More importantly (given Gunboat’s history), they are a solid business with a strong product line and over 700 boats on the water, and we expect they will be around for a lot longer than you will.

It’s not too late to have VaiVai for yourself this Caribbean race season. But if you want to try her out first or charter for an event, get in touch here.  Want to buy new?  Looking for a job? Want a free puppy? Get in touch with them today.

We expect a ride on one of these, ASAP, and you all can expect a long chat with Erickson and maybe even the designer of the new 68 coming very soon on the SA Podcast.  Got questions for these guys? Post them in the GB68 thread.

NOTE FROM THE EDITORS: Just to set the record straight, as much as are delighted to see Gunboat 57 VaiVai perform to its expectations, this evolution happened before the new management for Gunboat took over, and they don’t want to take any credit for an achievement that is primarily the work of VaiVai’s owner, Nigel Irens, and their team.  Congratulations to them on a beautiful boat and a job well done.

October 20th, 2016 by admin

Article Separator

post-3555-0-15527900-1475937842

If your dream boat was the Wauquiez Pilot Saloon 48, you may wish to steer clear for a bit; the boat at the US Sailboat Show in Annapolis seems to have some legal issues…

In other news, the new Gunboat is rising from the ashes of their bankruptcy on the back of the just-announced Gunboat 68.  It’s just vaporware as of today, but with orders already placed, we expect we’ll see this gorgeous creature IRL before too long.  and she looks gorgeous.  The VPLP design seems to integrate some of the swoopier, sexier lines of the Nigel Irens boats (G55, G60) without losing the look of power and substantialness of the more enduring 48/62/66.  With longtime SA’ers running the project, you can of course get firsthand info in the forums.  Find Nils and Mer hanging out at the boatshow.

October 8th, 2016 by admin

Article Separator

14258118_694297814059290_871085681695479335_o

While we’re grateful to have support of awesome sponsors throughout the sport, we’re even more grateful when they have real news instead of just press releases!  Just six months after launch, the first in a new line of Morrelli & Melvin designed, high-performance carbon cruising cats proved her racing prowess, with HH-6601 R-Six winning her first regatta! The six-boat fleet gathered at Port Adriano last week for the inaugural Multihull Cup – a new event designed to provide a fun and competitive regatta platform for 50′ and over performance cruising multis. Other participants included three M&M designed Gunboat 66s: Slim, Coco de Mer, and Outnumbered; the Nigel Irens’ custom 78’ Allegra and a 60′ Bañuls’ MC2 Dragon.

Harry Dunning was named the official rating authority by the Multihull Cup organizers; his complex and impartial rating system takes into account weight, waterline and sail area measurements as well as daggerboard and rudder dimensions. The system sees further adjustment each day based on wind conditions and course length as determined by the race committee.

img_7931Racing took place over three gorgeous days, with one race sailed each day. Mostly sunny skies, decent sized wind swell and variable breeze set the tone for an exciting weekend of racing. R-SIX performed strongly each day, finishing third on day one, 12min 34sec behind Allegra and 1min 12sec behind SLIM, third on day two 7min 42sec behind Allegra and 52 sec behind Coco de Mer, and ending the regatta in dominating fashion on day three, taking line honors and finishing 49 sec ahead of Allegra and 5min 55sec ahead of both SLIM and Coco de Mer, who finished within one second of each other. On corrected time, R-SIX placed 1st on day one, 2nd on day two, and 1st on day three.

Aboard were the core crew; the owner and his two permanent crew who’ve been with the boat since it’s arrival in Valencia in June. Four additional crew rounded out the team, including co-designer Gino Morrelli and longtime Anarchist and HH commissioning skipper Chris Bailet. The crew felt their performance throughout the regatta was strong, save for a few tactical and execution errors. Gino surmised that the crew work and tactical calls improved each day, and explained that on day three they seemed to have “found a new gear” and really sailed to their full potential.

The boat itself proved solid, sustaining fewer and less severe breakages than other boats in the fleet. A chafe issue with the Antal line driver on the starboard daggerboard left the board fixed down for much of the race on both day one and day two. Big thanks are owed to rigger Scott, who sailed the regatta as crew on Allegra but worked overtime in the evenings to help address the board issue. Damage reports from the other competitors included a busted hydraulic hose on Allegra, breakages to multiple sails on SLIM, and a busted main halyard on Dragon, among others.

A first place finish amongst a strong fleet of boats that are optimized for performance and well sailed is an obvious testament to the design and build of the HH66. To read Gino’s full race report from each day, head on over to the HH website here, and if you’d like to join in on the mostly uninformed and typically combative banter regarding the event, hit up the Multihull Cup thread in the SA Forums here.

Jesus Renedo photos.

September 27th, 2016 by admin

Article Separator

Screen Shot 2016-08-11 at 4.38.02 PM

Join the 1% while paying less than 1% of her original price!  Rainmaker has hit the market for a reserve price of just $15,000, with the salvage auction closing in early September.

From Cooper Salvage:

Description: Vessel dismasted during severe weather and was abandoned. Vessel was recovered after being at sea for over a year.

Type of water damage: Salt.  No shit.

August 11th, 2016 by admin

Article Separator

Screen Shot 2016-04-13 at 10.15.11 AM

Outremer: Pronunciation: /ˈo͞otrəˌmer/ – A name applied to the medieval French crusader states, including Armenia, Antioch, Tripoli, and Jerusalem. Origin:  From French outremer (adverb) ‘overseas’, from outre ‘beyond’ + mer ‘sea’.

 

The secret ‘stalking horse’ bidder for the bankrupt Gunboat company has finally popped up in the court filings for the beleaguered American icon, and who better to take over a high-performance offshore catamaran company than the country that invented high performance offshore catamarans?

 
That’s what Southern France’s Outremer Catamarans is aiming to do if the Court accepts their $500,000 bid for the North Carolina company’s molds, hulls, marketing lists, trendy swag, and quite possibly the G4 Timbalero.  Meanwhile, our old friends and the co-designers of the G4, Schickler Tagliapetra, have already moved on to develop a ‘baby G4’ under the Stiletto name.

 
Our Senior Editor says Outremer CEO Xavier Desmarest is the real deal.  “This guy oozes passion for the sport, has a refreshing and powerful concept of loyalty to his customers,” said Mr. Clean, who spent a couple of hours at the Outremer factory back in 2013.  “He seems to understand the ‘business of high performance cruising’ far better than most, which was probably Gunboat’s biggest failing.”

 

April 13th, 2016 by admin

Article Separator

Screen Shot 2016-03-14 at 10.16.20 AM

We learned several hours ago that the Gunboat 55 Rainmaker has indeed been found, and here’s where truth gets stranger than fiction.  The long-discussed G55, whose saga is here in all its glory, was spotted by members of Oracle Team USA while they were on a fishing trip off Bermuda!  A boat named Tenacious is slowly towing her back to base, and we’ll have more when it’s available.  Photo courtesy of Craig McFarlane and thanks to our friends for the heads up – you know who you are.

March 14th, 2016 by admin

Article Separator

Screen Shot 2016-01-18 at 11.15.04 AM2-time Melges 32 World Champ Jason Carroll doesn’t do things by halves, and he poured a small fortune in upgrades into the well-worn Gunboat 62 Elvis over the winter in preparation for an active 2016.  Ryan Breymaier took the Navigator’s award last week guiding the big cat from Lauderdale to Key West.  Here’s RMB’s first (of many) high-speed reports from 2016:

The forecast was for northerly 15 knots at the start and easterly at the finish, which would have meant short-gybing all the way from Lauderdale in order to avoid the worst of the Gulf Stream current; not the forecast we were looking for, considering that Elvis has been modified with 4 meters more rig, a longer boom and a longer bowsprit in order to power the boat up and fix persistent lee helm.

The end result of the mods is that the boat has 50% more mainsail and 55% more downwind sail, with a roller-furled, tight-luff gennaker replacing a spinnaker in a sock. We were afraid that we would not have quite enough power in the VMG conditions with a tight-luff sail and would have bad gybing angles resulting in about a thousand gybes down the course.

The boat also has bigger winches to deal with the sailplan, a real traveller and hydraulic mainsheet (instead of a bridle mainsheet to the transom corners), and the secret weapon; tillers which allow steering from outside instead of the wheel inside just aft of the mast – which is ideal for communications and comfort, but not at all for feel.

Start day dawned exactly as predicted with a nice northerly. We happily got our favored pin end and headed offshore on port with the big A3 pulling nicely.  We even lifted a hull as we crossed the line! Regardless of the adverse stream, there was more wind offshore and we wanted to avoid the wind shadow that is often found near the Miami skyline.  This was an immediate split from our main competition, the newly launched Arethusa, 60 feet of Nigel Irens-designed Gunboat. They outweigh Elvis by around 8000 pounds, but have a big mast and the soft luffed full-size kite which we feared would be our undoing.

As Arethusa (and most of the fleet) headed inshore, we made a couple of short gybes and stayed in the pressure offshore, especially in light of the approaching transition zone which we could see in the cloudline ahead.  Sure enough, we ran into the clouds and were rewarded with an earlier than expected easterly shift and pressure.  We started to soak, but not too much in order to keep the speed advantage given by luffing slightly with our tight luffed sail.  Elvis loves this; we were sailing between 2 and 5 knots faster than the breeze at 130 TWA.

After a little while the northerly tried to reassert itself so we went back inshore to consolidate and cemented about a 4 mile lead.

We had been watching the radar further down the course, where there was plenty of squall and rain activity.  This is classic KW race behavior, with the northerly on the north side of the keys fighting against the easterly breeze offshore.  As the squall line  showed itself to be just South of the lower keys, tactician Anthony Kotoun and I agreed to gybe back inshore in order to get into it as late as possible.

We were rewarded with a huge northerly shift as we got to the beach with the TWD going from 75 to 350 in the space of about 5 minutes.  We were on starboard so we just bore away and found ourselves headed SW in the perfect direction down the rhumb line, but directly into the squalls.

As we came into the first rain the breeze came up quickly and we eased sheets to stay on course and peeled to our Screecher/FRO, and one of those spectacular runs you hope for came together; 30 knots of boatspeed at the peak, with about an hour around 25.  Awesome crew work from the Elvis crew through 3 headsail changes and reef in and out allowed us to stay at full speed, putting a further 8 miles on our competition.  That’s when we decided to do some monohull hunting, looking for Wizard and Spookie, who had started half an hour ahead of us.

As we finished the last 25 miles of the race we realized that Wizard had the VMG edge on us (to be expected as they are 70 feet or so and very well-sailed) and that we were just slightly faster than Spookie who we passed in the channel heading up to Key Weird.

Unfortunately for the more awake amongst the crew, we arrived a couple hours after last call and so had to content ourselves with a big lunch and even bigger evening the next day.

I am definitely looking forward to getting to the Heineken regatta where there promises to be a big Gunboat fleet to line up against, as well as the awesome dock parties which I am confident we can also win, especially given all the training the boat’s built-in rum pump has given us all!  The Elvis team are a great crew; sailing regularly with the same core team shows in the quality of teamwork on the water. It’s also been a lot of fun for me to reunite with some guys I haven’t sailed with since college 13 years ago – a great way to start the 2016 racing year.

Ryan out.

January 18th, 2016 by admin

http://www.camet.com/

front-banner