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Posts Tagged ‘gulari’

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Clean’s back, this time with his final America’s Cup thoughts, and this time, with a slew of experts to dig into it with.  First, two longtime yachting scribes 6 decades of AC coverage between them; Associated Press sailing correspondent Bernie Wilson and longtime Aussie scribe Rob Mundle, who pull no punches in an analysis of went went right and wrong on the business and media end of AC35.

Next, a tech talk with the man behind the on-screen broadcast graphics known as Liveline, multiple world-record-holding navigator Stan Honey.  Find out what it will take for other events to get the kind of broadcast tech the Cup enjoys, and hear more ultra-geeky TV tech info from the ultimate tech geek.

Finally, a chat with America’s fastest foiler, double Moth world champion Bora Gulari, about the recent carnage in the Mackinac Race, his picks for the Moth Worlds, and his overall thoughts about an America’s Cup he was once destined for with Luna Rossa: Foil design, controls, and a great discussion on what Bora would like to see in the next America’s Cup (hint, it ain’t a multihull!).

Special thanks to all of you who’ve liked, shared, or commented on the SA Podcast; thanks to you, we passed the 200,000-download milestone last month, and our monthly averages are now over 30,000 downloads.  Please keep it up, and let us know if you’ve got someone we absolutely must talk to. Subscribe to the SA Podcast for two dozen episodes so far, with more great shit to come! (iTunesStitcher)

Show notes:

Intro

00:00:19 Sailing Anarchy current podcast numbers – 200K downloads – thank you listeners! 00:01:04 Reach out on itunes, stitcher, [email protected] if you have any show ideas. 00:05:55 The Ellison Era – the good, the bad, the ugly. 00:16:30 Cup media program, media coverage. 00:18:50 The in-person experience at AC Bermuda, 00:19:33 Broadcast/production problems with analysis. 00:26:222 Clean goes to Nacra 17/49erFX/49er European Championships – what to expect.

Bernie Wilson & Rob Mundle – Pre-America’s Cup – in Bermuda                                      

00:28:55 Intro to Bernie Wilson and Rob Mundle, plug for Mundle’s soon-to-publish Spithill biography. 00:30:57 legendary parties and the Society of International Nautical Scribes (SINS). 00:34:00 Does the Associated Press see sailing as a major sport? How do they cover it and why? Who is following the SA in mainstream media? 00:46:22 ACEA/Coutts/Bermuda administration; did Russell take his eye off the prize? “If they want to be mainstream, they have to act like a mainstream   sport.” 00:54:22 “Good riddance to Larry Ellison and the Cup. The Louis Viutton effect vs. the Red Bull effect. 00:58:00 will the US get behind an American challenger? 1:01:08 The Cup as a hooker and Coutts as the pimp.

Stan Honey – A Touch of Genius & A Taste of Brilliance               

01:03:07 Stan’s interesting month in Bermuda, his role in the 2017 AC. 01:06:42 Stan’s/Liveline’s role in AC35, differences between SF and BDA systems. 01:08:52 Factchecking Spithill’s claims that the software caused his multiple OCS. 01:11:20 On screen graphics/green screen/Hockey Puck swoosh from 1993/geeky broadcast stuff. 01:15:19 Bringing Liveline to lower budget classes/events. 01:18:18 Too much information for sailors? 01:21:08 Tech’s ability to make the sport less intimidating for both fans and competitors. 01:22:55 Storytelling, digital streaming, customizable interactive viewing, the PGA tour, professional directing. “The key to everything is the story.” 01:27:43 Stans’s experience at the AC, overall highlights. 01:28:45 Stan’s transpac record, what’s next. 01:29:35 That’s a wrap – custom feed and the importance of the storytelling team.

Bora Gulari Interview – Midwest Tech

01:35:27 Mackinac carnage – what happened to Natalie J? 01:38:38 the MOD aboard Meridian X, thoughts. 01:41:48 Safety conscious sailing – more sensible these days or more reckless? 01:43:19 Battle of the Lakes superboats, damage to Earth Voyager. 01:45:15 America’s Cup impressions, good vs. bad matches, and the problems with the grinding. “It just doesn’t feel right to me.” 01:47:46 Foil shapes and changeable surfaces, new Gitana, flaps. 01:50:07 Wing trimming vs. sail trimming. 01:51:25 automatic foiling, the Holy Grail of perfectly stable/low drag foiling. 01:53:07 The rise of Burling – luck vs. skill vs. maturity. 01:54:05 Foil shape analysis of AC. “Aspect ratio is king”, daggerboard shredding. 01:59:19 Getting personal/emotions at missing the Cup after being part of Luna Rossa team. “They definitely got the short end of the stick.” 02:01:53 Underdogs and outsiders. 02:03:15 If Bora picked his perfect boat for the next AC, what would it be? Why don’t we have widespread automated electronic foil control now? Other formats, “I think the Superfoiler has a lot of potential.” 02:10:30 Bora pulls out of Moth Worlds. 02:13:27 Moth Worlds form guide.

02:19:30 Outro/What’s next for the Sailing Anarchy Podcast/Wishlist for future talks

 

July 24th, 2017 by admin

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Despite the coming of the Foiling Revolution, there remain very few sailboats capable of breaking the 30-knot barrier.  We all know the Moth is one with speeds recorded into the low to mid 30s in the right conditions, but average speeds near 30 are extremely rare.  S’african video specialist Keith Brash managed to find one of those days with Quantum Racing skipper Bora Gulari, ripping together the above video of a 30-knot moth sesh. For more excellent Quantum content, including full time-lapsed TP52 races from Miami this week, head over here.

Screen Shot 2017-03-10 at 11.11.29 AMThis Beach Cat Goes To 35

According to most crews who’ve sailed them, the Diam 24 hasn’t lived up to her ultra-sexy VPLP trimaran looks.  Sure, there are some top teams sailing the now-beachy Tour De France, but that’s one of the only options for crewed teams looking to race in France.  But thanks to months of testing, design, and construction work and the perseverence of Francois Gabart and his team, the Diam is now a full-flying 35 knot beast they’re internally calling the Macif 24.

For more on the flying Diam, head over here.

March 10th, 2017 by admin

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Clean Report

In this double header to celebrate the end of a long road trip, Clean first talks to freshly minted Director of the US Olympic Sailing Team Malcolm Page.  The Australian double gold medalist and multiple world champion answers questions from Clean and the Anarchists, including a frank assessment of where the US team is, why he took the job, why the US team became also-rans for the past three cycles, and the route (and how long it’ll take) to rekindling America’s prowess in olympic sailing, as well as loads more questions.  More than an hour from Malcolm (with thanks to Will Ricketson and Josh Adams for their help and information provided for this podcast), learn more about him at www.ussailing.org.

The second part of our podcast has quite a bit more laughs, when we are rejoined by two repeat visitors, also both world champions.  Bora Gulari and Petey Crawford add their entertaining and knowledgeable voices to the SA Podcast, with the group discussing Bora’s new job helmsman of the Quantum Racing TP52 and his testing of both the new UFO Foiler in Newport and the new Nacra 17 Foiler in Holland. As a past Melges 32 world champ, Petey gets into  the new Melges 40 as the chat moves to the balkanization of big boat one-design classes.  As the drinks kept flowing, they turned to the world’s biggest problems: Foil kiting and the Olympics, the future of live sailing on the web, how to fly commercial using fake ID, and finally some ribbing on Mr. Clean’s performance at the summer’s Sunfish Masters Nationals.  Bring your popcorn for this one.

Our final November episode (sort of) comes to you thanks to our title sponsors Musto performance sailing gear, Torqeedo electric motors, Ocean Planet Energy Systems, and Doyle Sails New Zealand.

Download the podcast for later listening here at Libsyn, and subscribe on iTunes here.

December 4th, 2016 by admin

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Fresh off a crew substitution (trading windsurfer Solvig Sayre for Louisa Chafee, daughter of dropped out 2016 Presidential candidate Linc Chafee) original SA gangsta Bora Gulari looked to be taking the Nacra 17 class by storm this week at the OCR, sitting in medal position after three days of tumultuous Miami weather. With just two events forming the full Athlete Selection Series (yes, it’s actually called the A.S.S!) for Rio 2016, Bora and Louisa served notice to the husband/wife team of Mark and Carolina Mendelblatt and US Sailing Team Sperry racers (and former SCOTW) Sarah Newberry and Matt Whitehead that they were gunning for the American slot.  But a breezier day on Thursday rocketed all the Americans back in the pack, and as of Friday noon time, Bora sits in 14th, the only US team with a shot at making tomorrow’s Medal Race.

Newberry/Whitehead’ss consistent failure to perform has allowed Gulari and the Splats to turn this into a 3-boat horse race, one of the few left in any Class as the selections get near the end. It’s fun while it lasts, though realistically, any of these cat teams are far more likely to be fighting for tenth place than a medal once they get down South. For a full look at how the Selection Series works and who’s got a shot, check out this story from Will Ricketson and the US Sailing Team Sperry team.

Incredible shot from the legendary Petey Crawford/Penalty Box Productions.  Full results here.

 

January 29th, 2016 by admin

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From dinghy sailor to america’s cupper, you’ve been waiting for this one for weeks!  It’s the final Moth Worlds ‘Real Reel’ from Sorrento, Australia.  Now you can finally hear from Bora Gulari’s mouth just how CNN destroyed the top US foiler’s Worlds hopes, see what’s fun, exciting, and hilarious about southeast Oz, and learn about the natural habitat of the eastern longhaired bogan.  Meet ‘roos, kiwis, and even a brit or two.  Laugh, cry, and laugh again with the best 20 minutes we’ve ever seen on dinghy racing…all thanks to Petey Crawford with support from Sperry.

And if that’s not enough, here’s the Sailing Anarchy Ultimate Guide to the Moth Worlds: Your index to 50-odd videos, 6 days of live coverage, 7 gorgeous photo galleries, and plenty more.  Go.  Now.

 

February 10th, 2015 by admin

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PH-JOY-M24Nationals_235

We’ve all seen it happen, over and over again: A Class/regatta, or area (or judging from sailing’s decline since 1979, the entire country of America) judges the temperature of its customers poorly, and that line between ‘let’s go swap a little gelcoat with great sailors and earn their respect’ and ‘holy crap, I’ll never, ever have the time/money/desire to keep going in this sport’ disappears.  The issue is not simply about well-written and conceived rules, though they help; it’s more about the kind of perception and atmosphere created by the folks running the show.  No Class has more epitomized this struggle than the Melges 24; despite a feverish period in the 2000s when the M24 saw 100+ boat turnouts for the majors and big regional fleets, the NorthAm fleet went into rapid decline beginning about 2009. Escalating costs, difficulty in finding good crew who could hike as long and hard as the pros who absolutely filled the fleet, and distracted marketing from the builder were the culprits, and half a decade later, the Class is seeing a serious resurgence in the boat we’ve always considered to be the world’s most perfect one-design race boat.  Long time Melges performer and now pro crew Sam Rogers explains why.  Joy Dunigan photos with a sweet gallery over here.  World Champ Brian Porter beat Bora Gulari on the final day in a replay of something we feel like we’ve seen at about 10 of these Nationals.  Full reports here.

Where do you find that line between keeping top level pros in a fleet to provide that ultimate challenge, and keeping the average racer happy and engaged?  It certainly depends on the fleet you’re talking about, but there’s no question that for an open class like the Melges 24, the amateur owners and crews are absolutely vital to maintaining a successful fleet – and the overall sport.  Most amateurs want the challenge of sailing with and against the very best, but without the average man/woman making it to the race course, those lines are awfully lonely places.

I’m writing today just after an awesome 31-boat Nationals at Davis Island, FL, to let you know that the US Melges 24 Class seems to have made it through its ‘re-birth’ while really nailing this balance, and without losing its high-performance, grand prix identity.  Nearly a perfect split between open and amateur teams swapping blows over 3 days and 8 races with both overall and Corinthian standings going down to the wire and several all-amateur teams filling out the top ten. Kevin Nixon’s Accru+ entry from Australia took the overall Corinthian trophy and 7th overall, competing with his wife, daughter, son and son’s girlfriend.  Sounds like a perfect weekend getaway to us!

PH-JOY-M24Nationals_267Roger Counihan’s Just Add Water team (Lake Lanier, GA) is a Melges 24 staple, and he finished a solid 3rd Corinthian and 11th overall.  Roger thinks the fleet’s new look is awesome: “The Corinthians by themselves are a very strong fleet, and in every race there are Corinthian teams sticking it to the pros.  There’s nothing better than seeing an America’s Cup sailor or World Champion behind you – those are always great stories for the bar.  At the same time, its great to see what the pros are doing – how are they trimming their jib, where is their traveler, how hard are they soaking.   Plus, as a fan of sailing, watching strong teams full of sailmakers, Olympians, and boat builders go head to head in the same boat we sail is pretty cool.”

Part of the Class’s rebirth is thanks to the early success of the M24, and the big used-boat market that developed as the economy collapsed.  Enterprising sailors in a few unexpected regions scooped up good boats for great prices, the grassroots growth results are now filtering into the traveling/major regatta fleets.  “There are still new sailors picking up competitive starter boats for surprisingly low prices and quickly learning to mix it up,” said Counihan.  “Our fleet is a tight knit bunch of friends who have sailed on everyone else’s boats, help everyone get better, and hang out off the race course.”

PH-JOY-M24Nationals_188Texas & Gulf Coast District rep Ryan Glaze (Gringo) says it’s important to represent his regional fleet on the national stage.  “Our performance this past week at (2nd Corinthian, 8th overall) was important to our team, the Gulf Coast District, and to the USMCA.  We proved that you can get an older boat, put used sails on it, and be competitive with a good team of amateurs.  There are a lot of good sailors out there that would like to race the M24 but might be turned away by the costs. However, over the past couple of years, we have seen more teams in our district take a similar approach to ours; purchasing an older used boat, giving it a little TLC, and putting together a core group as your team.”

Through the ebb and flow of fleet growth in the 20 year history of the Melges 24 class and a stronger than usual used boat market, attracting a balanced mix of amateur and pro teams seems to have reach an equilibrium, and the spirit of the class has been renewed. Along with the solid turnout the Nationals, there was a strong sense of community with every sailor leaving with something. With a well attended class debrief led by some of the classes best-regarded pro and amateur helms (Porter, Gulari, Kullman, Madrigali), and an owners’ meeting that highlighted the recent growth in the class and previewed a solid 2015/16 schedule (featuring the 2015 Nationals at the awesome Gorge in late August and the 2016 worlds being narrowed down to a location in South Florida) the Melges 24 may be blazing a new trail as a model for successful One-Design fleet growth, just as it did over 20 years ago.

And it’s still quite a bit faster than all the 20-something production sporties that have come since…

 

November 18th, 2014 by admin

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Luna Rossa

What do you get when you mix the world’s best sailing photographer, the world’s best foiling sailor, and the world’s prettiest boat graphics?  A damned nice screensaver, that’s what!

You’re looking at Moth World Champ and Luna Rossa sailor Bora Gulari (seated on hull, aft) surveying some of his full-foiling handiwork while the boys wait for the Cagliari sea breeze to kick in for some practice; go here to see some Borlenghi pics of the beast flying late last week, and here’s some video. Check the Luna Rossa thread starting around here for loads more.

While Bora and the boys played at mach 1, Luna Rossa helmsman Francesco Bruni was taken apart by the boys in US blue in the Petit Finals of the WMRT stop in Sweden; Bruni sailed like a man possessed until that point, when Canfield made him look positively pedestrian.  Canfield took the final spot, while Swedish native Bjorn Hansen won his third-straight Swedish Match Cup, beating Ian Williams in the final.  Watch the final day action from Marstrand here (and watch for Gulari in this weekend’s Mackinac race, navigating for Phil O’Niel’s TP52 Natalie J).

July 8th, 2014 by admin

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3 more races down, 4 more to go on the final day of the Moth Worlds.  And Bora is sailing the lights out.  Enjoy this reel from Friday’s action in 6-9 knots of Hawaiian tropic.  Facebook is where you can find out who wins, who gets interviewed, and how sweet Thierry M’s photos are.  Racing starts at noon local time/1500 Pacific/1800 Eastern.  Title shout to Busy Signal.

 

October 19th, 2013 by admin

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