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Posts Tagged ‘chicago mackinac’

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After an ultraquick recordbreaker on the short side, the Big Mac, starting today, looks a bit more like the traditional freshwater hate mission.  Here’s the very latest video weather update from the organizers, and we recommend keeping an eye on CYC’s Facebook Page and the SA thread for the latest news.  This ‘5 Stages of Sailing The Mackinac Race” comes courtesy of yachtie/humorist ‘blubberboy’:

 1. Denial and Isolation – The first reaction to is to deny the reality of the situation. It is a normal reaction to rationalize overwhelming emotions. It is a defense mechanism that buffers the immediate shock. We block out the words and hide from the facts. This is a temporary response that carries us through the first wave of pain (before leaving the dock).

2. Anger – As the masking effects of denial and isolation begin to wear, reality and its pain re-emerge. We are not ready. The intense emotion is deflected from our vulnerable core, redirected and expressed instead as anger. The anger may be aimed at inanimate objects (winches and gear), competitors, or fellow crew members. Anger may be directed at the race itself. Rationally, we know the race is not to be blamed. Emotionally, however, we may resent the race for causing us pain, or for sucking us in to it’s grips; year after year.. We feel guilty for being angry, and this makes us more pissed. ( at the starting area)

3. Bargaining – The normal reaction to feelings of helplessness and vulnerability is often a need to regain control –

-If only we had withdrew from the race earlier…

-If only we had just called in sick…

-If only we had just turned off our phone, and burnt all of our sailing gear….

Secretly, we may make a deal with God or our higher power in an attempt to postpone the inevitable. This is a weaker line of defense to protect us from the painful reality ( Right after your start).

4. Depression – Two types of depression are associated with the Chicago to Mackinac Race. The first one is a reaction to practical implications relating to the the race itself. Sadness and regret predominate this type of depression. We worry about the wasted time. We worry that, in our grief, we have spent less time with others that depend on us. This phase may be eased by simple clarification and reassurance. We may need a bit of helpful cooperation and a few kind words. ( First 5 miles in)

The second type of depression is more subtle and, in a sense, perhaps more private. It is our quiet preparation to separate and to bid our sanity farewell. Sometimes all we really need is a big kick in the ass (Second five miles in).

5. Acceptance – Reaching this stage of the race is a gift not afforded to everyone.  It is not necessarily a mark of bravery to resist the inevitable and to deny ourselves the opportunity to make our peace. This phase is marked by withdrawal and calm. This is not a period of happiness and must be distinguished from depression. Basically, is just an ‘ah fuck it…’  moment.( A little before, or after the  Bahai Temple).

 

July 23rd, 2016 by admin

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Fresh off his $20k winning performance as the Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing OBR, Matt Knighton checks in from the Chicago Mackinac Race aboard the TP52 Imedi.  Head over to the tracking page quickly to see whether Rick Warner’s brand new (to him) ORMA 60 can catch the Volvo 70 Il Mostro before the poop-covered finish.  Thread here.
We just cannot find the wind.
There’s been this elusive band of breeze on the horizon all morning and now into the afternoon that taunts us – we keep sailing towards it, but then it pulls away. We’re slowly coming to the realization that the mirage effect of the lake and the Michigan shoreline has been playing a cruel joke on us all day.
The favorite phrase onboard is echoed every few minutes, “I think there’s a band of pressure over there coming down to us now…” it’s repeated over and over – we’ve yet to see it pay dividends.
There’s a mixture of pain and relaxation onboard. Spirits are high. This is the Mac Race after all and what would it be without a little light air sailing! Then again, ever since the sked at 10am that showed we had lost 25 miles to the competition who had invested in the Michigan shore overnight, we’ve needed some encouragement.
Pulled pork sandwiches just came to the rescue. So juicy, so good…everyone had seconds.
The sun is setting lower now and we’re clamoring to make it to the breeze that the skeds show is ahead of us. The familiar landmark of Point Betsie is growing larger on the horizon and the canyon of dunes that is the Manitou Passage isn’t too far off now!
It’s been the longest 6 hours of our lives it feels like – we’ve been hovering at less than 3 knots of boat speed the entire time – and the biting black flies are making their cameo appearance. The carnage up on deck is shown in the number of black dots covering the white deck.
Still, couldn’t ask for a better crew to go through the pains and joys of sailing the longest freshwater race in the world. Even though we’ve recycled the same jokes now 3 times…we’re still laughing harder and harder.

July 12th, 2015 by admin

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