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Posts Tagged ‘Catamaran’

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With the day of the sail racing ‘music video’ style behind us, sailing’s cutting edge creatives have been learning to speak truth to sailing with new shots, creative editing, and real narrative.  And along with Petey Crawford and Sam Greenfield, no one is pushing harder than Waterlust’s Pat and Fiona, and this is their most masterful work yet in a short career full of gorgeous, creative sailing and maritime movies.

It’s the story of the ‘Angry Burds’ – Tripp and Trevor Burd and the hi-po 23-foot beach cat they took from Washington to Alaska in this summer’s epic new R2AK.  But it’s also the story of one of the baddest media vehicles we’ve ever seen, a gorgeous editor and her creatively explosive man, an epic road trip, and a pair of brothers bonded in the forge of the ocean.

The 30 minute piece is the kind of show that Warren Miller  or David Brown would be proud of; part ‘surf style’ and part adventure story.  Drone footage, time lapse roadwork, and the sheer beauty of the Inside Passage make it something you can share with your grandmother or granddaughter equally.  Sit back, grab an icy beverage and your favorite sailor, and enjoy.  And huge props to the folks at Sperry for making the film and the Burds’ program possible.

 

August 14th, 2015 by admin

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Despite tight racing and lots of lead changes, the Copenhagen M32 Series event off with a bit of a light-air whimper, but get stoked, live sailing fans, ’cause the real deal is blowing in today!  Stay tuned for a much more interesting look at the future of the million-dollar World Match Racing Tour and grand prix racing.  Just like the America’s Cup, but for all of us – not just the billionaires. Canfield and Dackhammer tied after 3; live from 0830 EDT above.

August 14th, 2015 by admin

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post-20188-0-05869000-1437896549Who says beach cats can’t race offshore?  Randy Miller’s M32 catamaran horizoned the 100-ish NM Santa Barbara to King Harbor fleet this weekend, beating Bill Gibbs 52-foot cat Afterburner by almost three hours and the first monohull – a TP52 – by almost two and a half. Here’s Randy’s report, from the thread.

We deployed our gennaker right from the start and that kept us moving through the glass at 6-8kts but at least 15 degrees lower than most everyone else.  We made two short miserable tacks back to the fleet through about 120 degrees and then made up our minds that we needed to just keep the boat moving down the course, sail our own race, and that patience and perseverance would win the day.  Credit to our most excellent navigator. So we followed the beach with the gennaker up trying to sail as tight as we could without parking the boat and waiting for the pressure to build and clock North.  It finally happened at around 14:30.  The wind began filling in and clocking North and we got lifted right up to the West end of Anacapa doing 12-15kts close reaching in the light but building breeze.

Near Anacapa we saw a ton of wildlife.  Several whales, a large pod of dolphins, seals jumping out of the water, big fish jumping out of the water.  All very cool to see.

On the back side of Anacapa the wind was steady and mostly West with still some South I think so no lee off of Santa Cruz Island.  We bore away around Anacapa but stayed on Starboard for another 45 minutes making 17-18kts with great VMG towards King Harbor.  Then we gybed in for Malibu and slowly accelerated up to 20-22kts.  We had to gybe twice to clear a freighter in the channel but kept on building speed until we blasted by Pt Dume doing 24-25kts.

From Pt. Dume we had just about a perfect layline all the way into King Harbor that allowed us to come up at the end into the fading breeze to keep the speed on all the way to the bell buoy.

Even with 150lbs of extra safety gear and a painful start, we kept the boat moving and had a blast sailing 97.7 miles at an average speed through the water of 13.4kts.  We had a great crew that sailed well and stayed focused for the whole day.  This after 3 straight days of loading, and trailering, and building, and launching, and staging vehicles and driving around LA.  What a mission! Thanks guys.

This was my first mid-distance race on the boat and it was a fantastic experience.  I can’t wait to do more.  Hopefully the ORCA guys didn’t mind us playing in their sandbox.  Thank you ORCA for helping me satisfy the safety requirements for the race.  Santa Barbara and the whole coast and waters were absolutely beautiful.

post-20188-0-33745100-1437892996The only negative was getting a call from the race committee this morning delivering the infuriating news that one of the TP52s (guess which one) lodged a protest against us saying they were “sure [I] didn’t complete the proper course in the Santa Barbara race and should withdraw.”  And that I “should have rounded Anacapa Island.”

I replied by providing my GPS track.  This satisfied the race committee but not these guys because according to them, “not one person in the fleet saw [us] round Anacapa Island.”  Apparently, the mind cannot comprehend that inshore and in coastal waters an M32 beach cat crushes a TP52 lead mine all day long.

Despite the annoyance of managing the protest today I still managed to take my wife, uncle, and 93-year-old grandpa for a joyride out of Marina Del Rey and get down to King Harbor for the party and to pick up my winning silver octopus cupcake stand trophy.  Good times!

 

July 28th, 2015 by admin

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Beach cats plus cold front equals a hell of an expensive beach sculpture.  Huge bummer in the North Holland beach village of Egmond aan Zee, and there are some more gorgeous, if painful, shots here.

July 26th, 2015 by admin

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Despite plenty of organizational touting of ‘a new world record’ fleet of nearly 200 F-18s for this week’s Kiel Worlds, the actual fleet fell far short, but you’ve gotta love the strength of a fleet that’s disappointed by ‘just’ 167 entries.

Meanwhile, it’s a real battle royale at the front between 7 different nations, but after 6 races, it’s the Spanish-flagged father/son team of Mitch and Ruben Booth leading reigning World Champ Gunnar Larsen on the tiebreak.  The Booths are on a fresh-from-the-factory Wildcat; if you’re looking for a fast fleet that allows out-of-the-box boats and decade-old designs to race competitively, this is the one.

There’s live tracking here, decent but low-res photos over on the event Facebook page, and some truly awful videos here.  Find our title inspiration over here, and if you have daddy issues, bring a tissue.

July 16th, 2015 by admin

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We’re extremely excited to announce that the longtime SA supporters and advertisers at Aston Harald, the builder of the M32 (née Marstrom 32) racing cat, have closed on the purchase of the World Match Racing Tour this week, and in 2016, the Tour will go either mostly or entirely multihull in three 8-boat fleets of identical M32s to be transported to WMRT venues around the world.  Fleet racing will become a part of the events, as will an entirely new prize money structure – basically, Aston Harald founder and longtime sailing sponsor Hakan Svensson (ex-Berg Propulsion CEO and Puma/Mar Mostro sponsor) wants to use the M32 as a modern platform to provide younger sailors with the pathway to top-level pro racing that doesn’t exist today.

In some ways, the WMRT will go back to basics, regaining its stature as the feeder that it was back in the IACC days.  In other ways, it’s an entirely new day with an entirely new vision, and we’re proud to have been around to help the wonderful Goran Marstrom put the rig up on the first-ever M32 in Miami, 2012.

There’s even more exciting news to come about the revamped WMRT during a press conference next Wednesday at the Stena Match Cup Sweden; it’ll be streamed live.  And keep your eyes out for more full-noise action at the next M32 Scandinavian Series in Copenhagen in August.

The rendering of Valhalla ( Svensson’s new M32) shows that the Viking spirit is still alive and well in the Western isles of Sweden. If you’ve been itching to go live in the land of a million perfect blondes and you know carbon fiber, they’re hiring…

Got questions or wanna read the full release?  Here.

June 25th, 2015 by admin

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With five different boats winning the first five races of the M32 Series opener in Oslo, calling the racing ‘tight’ is something of an understatement.  The one boat off the pace is first-time M32 competitor Eivind Melleby’s Team Hydra from Norway, and here’s a shot showing their form on a puffy day in the Oslo Fjord.  The M32 proved its beach cat heritage accurate – Melleby’s team was upright and racing 15 minutes after their tip.

Thursday’s highlight reel is here, and the full replay of the live footage is here.  Stay tuned to the front page for today’s racing, beginning at 1400 CET/0800 EST with Clean on the mike.  Photo credit Henrik Ljungqvist/M32Series.

 

May 22nd, 2015 by admin

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Florida 300 Day 1John Casey checks back in from the first real foil-off between the FLying Phantom and his Nacra 20 FCS. His photo, and of course our title reference to one of the funniest shows of the 2000s.

If you’re having a light conversation with someone and they say, “Hey, you should come down to the Keys for a sail,” you meant yesterday.  The sun was peering down on us, the wind was around 12 knots with low puffy clouds drifting over the shore and the water was about the same balmy temperature as the wind. It was absolutely pleasurable.

The real story of our day came courtesy of large clumps of sargasso lining up on their march to shore, just hanging out waiting for us. Yes, they play havoc with our daggerboard boats, but a unique and surprising thing happens when the FCS foils through the weeds; they slice right though them. What we thought was going to be the biggest hindrance on this flat water leg from Islamorada to Key Biscayne was actually helpful to us, as the slower boats had to clear their boards far more often.  We called our day ‘mowing the lawn’.

The Nacra performed brilliantly as we foiled the entire upwind/close reach day except for a couple lulls and when we had to pinch up high to get over the sandbar protruding from Elliot Key. We finished in exactly four hours. The powerful sail plan definitely helped in the lighter conditions, as the curved board Nacra 20 Carbon arrived to the beach in second place 20 something minutes after us. It’s really all about sawing that mainsheet as well. My crew, Colin Page, played it like a tug-of-war anchorman all day. Sail trim is so important for the balance you need to stay smooth on the foils.

The tried-and-rock solid Nacra 20 crew of Steve Lohmeyer and Jay Sonnenklar are leading the biggest fleet of Nacra 20s.

For more action, check out the Florida 300 site, and stay tuned for my final report over the weekend.

 

May 15th, 2015 by admin

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It has been a long time since we’ve seen this much excitement around a new boat launch, but we reckon if ever a boat deserved it, it’s the world’s first fully foiling cruiser/racer.  Sick work from all the Gunboat G4 build/design team, and we’re proud to host this World Premier of the beautiful film of Timbalero 3′s sea trials earlier this week (thanks to Richard and Rachel).

Mr. Clean heads down to Antigua at the end of the month for his in-depth, Anarchy look at the G4; in the meantime, head to the thread for all the news and analysis here.

 

April 11th, 2015 by admin

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Worrell 1000 sail smallerAs so famously documented in a brilliant article in Sports Illustrated (back when a brazillion men read it) and followed by hundreds of thousands of fans over the years, the Worrell 1000 was one of America’s most iconic races.  It was 1000 miles (or quite a bit more, at times) of bone-crushing, soul-bruising beach cat sailing, surf-launching, and high-speed crash-landing along the Atlantic Coast, with tons of old legends and unknown-but-now-familiar names showing their sack and insanity.

The Worrell died through a combination of the naivete of its creator, the now-deceased Mike Worrell, and some bloodsucking lawyers; it lives on in our hearts, and in today’s post from Anarchist “DryArmour”:

I still have this Hobie 16 mainsail from the 1983 Worrell 1000. My dear friend Carlton Tucker was one of the team members along with Hobie [Alter, -ed] Junior and Miles Wood. The sail is in great shape.  Pretty amazing for a sail that is more than 32 years old…The format used that year was non stop round the clock racing alternating team members at each stop. Brutal.

Share your Worrell 1000 memories here.

 

January 26th, 2015 by admin

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