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Posts Tagged ‘America’s Cup’

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If one crash video replay is great, it’s logical that a dozen of them are spectacular.  Here’s a little montage of all the possible angles of the Artemis vs. clueless umpire boat crash in Bermuda, set, of course, to German house music.  Just because.


November 2nd, 2015 by admin

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Screen Shot 2015-10-30 at 10.51.55 AMAs any visitor to these pages knows well, the sailing community has almost universally shared a sense of betrayal over the ‘appropriation’ of the America’s Cup to another country by the American defender.  At the same time, San Francisco’s multi-million dollar AC shortfall and the bad taste left in San Diego and Newport’s mouths from ACEA’s negotiating sleaziness mean that sailing events in America have a tough road ahead if they’re going to try to repair some of the damage caused by Russell’s flying circus.

Thanks to the hard work of the Volvo Ocean Race, Sail Newport, and thousands of volunteers and cheerleaders, that job just got a hell of a lot easier; that’s because the numbers are in, and the Newport stopover for the VOR added some $32M in direct spending to the RI economy and nearly $50M in overall economic impact, with the government laying out only a tiny fraction of that amount to supply the stopover with services.

So even though we don’t know who will be running the next VOR or what teams we’ll see on the starting line, we’re pleased to share with you the news that the stopover voted ‘best’ by nearly every sailor, spectator, and reporter in the 2014-15 race has been confirmed to be BACK in May 2018, the only North American stop for the world’s most-watched sailboat race.  We congratulate everyone involved, and applaud Volvo and SailNewport management for doing smart business while also acting as custodians for the good name of the sport.

Imagine if Russell and the ACEA folks would learn that these are not mutually exclusive goals.

October 30th, 2015 by admin

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With the conclusion of yet another one-day sailing event, the 2015 America’s Cup World Series is a memory, with the most memorable moment of the season coming Sunday when yet another incompetent America’s Cup worker bee (a judge boat) crashed headfirst into Artemis Racing.  The crash removed the Swedish-flagged boat’s bowsprit, unintentionally helping them to an event victory in a nice, non-gennaker Sunday breeze.  If that was Shirley Robertson, it would’ve been Nathan’s fault.  Anyone still think Russell’s 2-day, 4-race format is a success? Bueller?

There’s no reason to search for footage of Sunday’s ACWS action, such as it was – just watch the crash linked above and the excellent ETNZ video in the player for all the flavor you need.  You won’t be alone, either – the piece of shit live viewing App being touted by the America’s Cup has pulled a grand total of between 5000 and 10,000 installs on Google Play, with the IOS app page showing even less action, and with an average rating of 2/5 stars for the primary communications platform for the AC (and more than half of reviews at 1-star), it’s no surprise that the world’s interest in the America’s Cup has been dropping precipitously.  Here are a few reviews, but we really encourage you to head over and read some of the 100+ nasty ones for some afternoon fun.

too expensive Paid for app then found they want more $ to be able to watch the Bermuda replays.

Absolute cr4p… Typical of the ACEA… $7.99 and no racing… lol can’t even see the leader board. .. Oh well one day they’ll get it right.

This is terrible for the sport…. shame on you.

Bad experience overall. Continually freezing during video. Sits on authorization screen (checking location) forever.

Clearly, humiliation and a similar reputation to FIFA doesn’t bother America’s Cup too much; maybe a post to their Facebook or Twitter feeds will accomplish something, but we doubt it…


October 20th, 2015 by admin

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Emirates Team New Zealand went into rebuilding mode over the last cycle, tapping the very best of their high speed sailors in the barely-out-of-nappies youngsters Pete Burling and Blair Tuke.  Managing the new energy these kids bring aboard is a guy who’s very much a kid himself, despite his age and experience – Glenn Ashby.

The three sat down with Kiwi sports talk host (and longtime Dalts pal) Tony Veitch in a half-hour update on all things ETNZ and 49er Olympic team; Go to the 32nd page of the ETNZ thread in America’s Cup Anarchy to talk shit about it.


October 8th, 2015 by admin

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Screen Shot 2015-10-08 at 11.11.36 AM

The swan song for the monohull World Match Race Tour gets an extra dose of talent with the ACWS Bermuda in town, and some monster breeze in the wake of Hurricane Joaquin saw Taylor Canfield stomp to a 7-0 record on the first day despite the presence of names like Minoprio, Williams, Draper, Bruni, and Barker.  Bermuda also saw its share of wipeouts and rounddowns in the ancient IOR, though we’ve been unable to find any video from the event.

You can follow along on the Tour’s FB page here; props to (we think) Charles Anderson for this shot of rolling thunder above; and the best pics are over here.

October 8th, 2015 by admin

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Screen Shot 2015-09-22 at 12.11.37 PMThe only thing more consistent than Oracle Team USA and Russell Coutt’s complete incompetence in the marketing and administration of the America’s Cup has been the stellar work of longtime OTUSA photographer Gilles Martin-Raget.  The soft-spoken French photographer has apparently gotten the boot, according to an e-mail circulating on the web that says Raget has basically had all his passwords changed and gotten the axe without even the most basic explanation.

Thinking of working for the America’s Cup?  Understand that no job is safe when there are idiot CEOs flailing around trying to divert blame for their very public failures.  Loyalty is for the weak…


September 22nd, 2015 by admin

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Screen Shot 2015-09-10 at 10.20.32 AMConflicts and family requirements mean that Sailing Anarchy will miss the C-Class Catamaran Championship for the first time in a long time, and we’re sorry to say that, unless something huge changes, our absence means the live On-The-Water Anarchy coverage you came to depend on in both Newport (’10) and Falmouth (’13).  Fortunately, there are plenty of long time Anarchists racing their high-tech cats in the event, and the student-run Rafale Project team takes a break from setup for the Little America’s Cup in Lake Geneva to send in this report from the paddock.

So far it’s been a lot of very long days leaving our house at the crack of dawn, to avoid the Geneva traffic, and leaving SNG well past sunset most days! But it’s been a real blast for everyone in the team. It has also been fun reconnecting with old friends and making new ones.

Personally I have been humbled by the welcome we have received from the Hydros foundation team, the people at SNG and all the other competitors. It reminded me again why I love this class so much and why I keep wanting to get back into it despite the stupendous effort it takes to get there.  The fact that one of the foil specialist from the Groupama team took time out of his busy day to come and see us, give us some advice and lend us some of their equipment to improve our foils is a testament to the spirit of the class that unites us.

The buzz around the Little Cup village definitely helps getting through the day. Everyone is helping everyone and sharing tools, exchanging advice, knowledge or even helping each other launch and retrieve the boats.  But our arrival here has also been the time for a serious reality check! It took us a couple of days to prep Rafale for our first day out.  There was still a big job list left from our last sail in Montreal. Yesterday we spent 4 hours on the water in light wind. Upwind performance looked not too bad, but Marc and Trevor were really struggling to find the right mode downwind.  We learnt a lot from out first sail though, and clearly we still had a lot of work to do!!!

Then came our second reality check in the form of Franck Cammas’ green missile. There is no other word for it! I don’t think I’ve ever seen a C class going this fast, let alone in this kind of wind conditions. I admit it was a bit demoralising for everyone, I think especially for our sailing team.  But that only lasted for a short while. As usual, the team picked itself up and carried on. Today as every other team went out in even lighter conditions we focused on improving the boat. As I write this, back at HQ, I feel quite confident we have made some drastic improvements. We completed most of our rework on the hydrofoils and rudders, reviewed our control system, changed the setup of our element 2 morphing tab and cleaned up the rest of the wing aero. The latter 2 items should drastically increase our downwind performance. There has been little time to look at other boats and gauge the competition. Still there are lots of interesting designs and ideas. I will have to try and post some pics of some of these.

Team Norgador has some nice improvements to the Hydros boat they are chartering. They have bigger version of a moth ride height control that looks pretty neat. And I do like their end plate. It’s really clever! This would have my vote vs. End-plating to the tramp… These guys deserve a lot of credit for putting this effort together is such a short period and with such limited resources!  Sentient Blue / former Alpha is looking as good as ever in the hands of its new team. Will be interesting to see how they fare if the conditions are light!

Cogito looks nice too in the Axon racing paddock. Iast time I saw her wing, it was in bits on the NYYC lawn after the Steve’s unfortunate capzise. But she looks great now with the wing rebuilt! What an amazing piece of C class history! Who knows how the team’s local knowledge will play out.
I haven’t had a chance to look at Steve’s boat in details yet. I’m very intrigued to find out the details of their setup. It’s exciting to see something radical pop up!

As for Groupama, well their deck looks more like a fighter jet cockpit than a C-Class! I’ve never seen so many control lines and indicators in such a small space! I hope Franck likes spaghetti!!! I kind of wonder whether they will be rigging missile pods on the wing tomorrow or canons on their foils!!! More seriously though they are clearly not taking things for granted and they have been working as much as everyone else to prepare their boat. I’ve seen a few different foils being tested back to back…

The last team, Team Gstaad yacht Club has been a bit conspicuous by their absence… Their tent is being used as the scrutineering bay so no space for them yet. But I kind of wonder whether they will arrive with some surprise tech on their Hydros boat.  Anyway this is going to be a fun race come Monday!
In the meantime we have a lot of work to get Rafale ready, and hopefully tomorrow we can line up with some of the other boats to see how our improvements look.



September 10th, 2015 by admin

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With a dismally light but gorgeously sunny forecast on the North Malastrand River, we can’t promise much excitement on day one of the double-points finale to the M32 Scandinavian Series in Stockholm.  But the spectators will be out in force as US-One goes for its clean sweep of the 2015 series, and we’ve got plenty of interesting features to share with you as we wait for the wind to fill in.  Check it out above, and go here for the preview story.


September 10th, 2015 by admin

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IMG_3996We don’t have to feign shock at the latest comically silly behavior from the America’s Cup; the release of thousands of balloons into the air to celebrate the end of the otherwise non-noteworthy America’s Cup World Series Göteberg event.

It seems like just yesterday when the America’s Cup had partners like Sailors for the Sea to tell them that RELEASING BALLOONS IS NOT A FUCKING ‘THING’ ANYMORE!  Apparently, that kind of thing doesn’t matter to them anymore.  Or maybe they were jealous of all that press that Rio’s been getting.

But the environment matters to us as sailors, and we have long known that the balloon industries’ claims about biodegradable latex are mostly bullshit. Even the most ‘eco-friendly’ marketed balloons will be in the water or on the ground for months or years, doing wonderful things to the airways of fish, birds and mammals while decorating shorelines with their pretty colors as they ‘break down.’   That’s why no one with a conscience still releases balloons.

And even if they were biodegradable, would it matter? Cardboard boxes are biodegradable – does that give you the right to drop  thousands of them on a city from an airplane to celebrate your sailboat race?

Listen, folks – we get that the AC and its title sponsor Louis Vuitton has decided that super-wealthy are really all that matters for AC35′s bottom line.   But we don’t believe that you need to take a huge, stinking blue and yellow shit all over the environment just to show that you’re part of their club.

Unless…hang on a second…could it be that Russell Coutts is hunting for some of that big fat Gazprom sponsorship money? Hey Russell, here’s an idea for a ceremony to end the Bermuda ACWS event later this year: The party starts with a celebratory oil spill in the Great Sound, continues on to an all-you-can-eat conch, lobster, and bluefin tuna barbecue, and concludes with the release of thousands of mourning doves.  Be careful, though – it appears the Bermudians care more about their environment than you thought when you tried to steamroll them.

Title reference to something almost as nasty as the AC’s environmental stance (NSFW).


August 31st, 2015 by admin

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Screen Shot 2015-08-28 at 11.37.06 AMQuestion of the Week

The most common question we’ve gotten over the past month is some version of “what’s going on with/why can’t I watch the America’s Cup like I could last time around?”  With the Gothenberg ACWS event ready for action this weekend, here’s the very bizarre explanation.

Last month, Organizers of the America’s Cup rolled out perhaps the most embarrassing display of cluelessness we’ve seen in sports broadcasting in years with the “AC+” App. At the same time, Russell Coutts went from the guy who so famously and recently promised to bring yacht racing to the ‘Facebook Generation’ and share the excitement of the sport’s pinnacle with the world, to the guy who has completely given up on whatever lofty goals he once had for the America’s Cup sailing’s penetration into mainstream sport.

The pullback really began way back during the buildup to the last AC; a huge broadcast and media budget slash and organization-wide layoffs just after the San Diego ACWS event signaled Cup Watchers that Ellison had cut off the funds necessary for a lasting push into mainstream media.  With tens of millions already spent and the AC looking like a walkover, producers lucked into a dream scenario that included a massive lead for the underdog and tapped into the public’s intense dislike for Ellison and Coutts. The free, live, Youtube coverage of the actual America’s Cup was, without a doubt, the most compelling sailboat racing we’ve ever seen.

The problem, as we’ve discussed ad nauseam, was that outside of New Zealand no one watched. To us, that wasn’t a surprise at all;  huge budget cuts and poorly negotiated contracts with the TV networks who agreed (for a fee) to carry the AC broadcasts meant almost zero promotion or advertising in the mainstream; Official Broadcast Partner NBC couldn’t even be bothered to add ‘sailing’ to the sports listed on their website menu – a menu that included badminton, poker, fishing, and competitive dog shows.  Presumably, Coutts and his team were operating under that old standby for the incredibly arrrogant or clinically insane: the Field of Dreams marketing plan. “If you build it, they will come.”  And of course, they didn’t.

While the elusive ‘new fan’ stayed away, the filmmakers at least created some gorgeous-looking visuals and showed how exciting and compelling the racing could be, and most of us anticipated some success when Coutts and his team went hunting for a broadcast strategy for AC35.  But rather than building on the great work they did to get an exciting event and a wonderful sport in front of millions of young, new fans, ACEA went the other way.  And rather than a 2017 event and buildup that would push the sport’s exposure forward, a combination of huge delays, venue uncertainty, unqualified staff, and the kind of hubris that left TV executives walking away from negotiations scratching their heads meant the end of the dream.  So now, instead of being able to share a Youtube link with all the kids in your extended family, you’re gonna be paying 8 bucks for a buggy, glitchy, horribly-reviewed app that might just let you watch some sailboat racing (if you are in a non-blacked out area and you don’t mind watching on a phone screen).

Somehow, despite all of this being fairly public and extremely obvious, the people at America’s Cup have no problem sending out bullshit ‘News Releases’ touting the awful job they’ve done as something amazing.  It’s some of the most bizarre PR work we’ve ever seen, something closer to the dissembling and revisionism of Donald Trumps handlers than the words of a major sports body.

Let’s take a look at just their most recent release, which caps a few months of fetid bullshit spouting from the ACEA press corps.

Since Bermuda was revealed as the host venue of the 35th America’s Cup on December 2, 2014, a flurry of significant commercial partnerships and broadcast agreements have been reached, including with Louis Vuitton, who return to extend one of the longest title partnerships in international sport.

Let’s just get Louis Vuitton out of the way, because we all know that the very last thing LVMH care about is the public, 99.9% of which will never be able to afford the least expensive product they sell.  Louis Vuitton’s sponsorship model is very simple, and works entirely by bringing in a couple hundred of their very best customers – people who spend well over a million a year on hugely expensive handbags, clothes, watches, and other substitutes for self-confidence – and they VIP the hell out of them during the various AC events.  The experience can get those VIPs to double their purchases that year, and that’s why Louis Vuitton spent 8-figures on the deal.  They like it exclusive – the fewer people who watch, the better. Not unlike Rolex (which couldn’t come up with the pile of cash that LVMH did).

But let’s get to the meat of this latest ‘news’.  ACEA writes with glee that “NBC in the United States, BT Sport and the BBC in the UK and Ireland, CCTV in China, Canal+ in France and ESPN in Central and South America are among the major broadcasters who have acquired the rights to show the full two year program of racing in the 35th America’s Cup.”

But it’s almost entirely bullshit, and it’s part of a pattern of deceit that shows a basic and complete disregard for the public’s intelligence.  Here’s why:

1) NBC is MOST DEFINITELY NOT the America’s Cup Broadcaster.  For foreigners, NBC is a massive, free-to-air network that reaches tens of millions, and they will not be broadcasting a fucking thing! Nope; the AC’s ‘broadcast partner’ is NBCSN, which was until recently known Canada’s Outdoor Life Network, and then Versus. NBC Sports Group picked it up a couple of years ago for their ‘niche sports’ stuff – things Americans rarely watch.  Premier League, F1, and American soccer, for instance.  Yet despite the low-rent address, you still could not watch the ACWS-Portsmouth live on NBC, NBCSN, or any other network in the USA.  Must have been a poker tournament on.

2) The BT Sport 2 channel that ACEA was so excited about in England is another sparsely-subscribed pay-only channel, and English broadcast sources tell us that the max audience for the BT Sport 2 stream in Portsmouth would have been well under 20,000 households.  And that’s with a British hero fighting for the win over the Yankee invaders.

3) As of right now, you can’t even watch the BBC version of the short highlight show on the BBC iPlayer.  It is apparently on BBC2 only, and apparently only on late at night.

4) CCTV China is an internet-only channel that exists almost entirely as a report-padder for Western TV broadcast dealmakers, and as one Shanghai sailor told us, “If a hundred people watch it on CC, we’ll all be shocked.”  Look, we’re in China and available for billions!”.  No, you aren’t.

5) The most egregious example of ACEA’s shenanigans comes with their release this week about their new deal with ‘ESPN’, which, ACEA writes, has acquired the exclusive multiplatform rights to the 35th America’s Cup in more than 40 territories, including Mexico, Central America and South America, and non-exclusive rights in the Caribbean.

And yet once again, and despite what the release says, it’s not what it seems.  The ‘Broadcast Partner’ is not ESPN, which ‘reaches sports fans in 61 countries and 7 continents’.  It is ESPN International, which reaches those hotbeds of yachting in Central and South America, along with the huge audiences in the Caribbean. </sarcasm>.  And meanwhile, ACEA touts the hell out its deal with ESPN publicly despite ESPN (not ESPNi) being a direct and massive competitor for NBC Sports, which was the first and presumably most important partner for this AC.

What’s The Solution?

We’ve seen how the America’s Cup is immune to negative public opinion; if it weren’t, Russell Coutts would have been fired from management 50 times over the past two decades.  But if the world publicizes the fact that ACEA’s staff has literally dialed the clock back a decade, something will have to change or the America’s Cup will continue to slip off the pinnacle to be replaced by events that do a better job of reaching the public and the sponsors.  The 2014-15 Volvo Ocean Race eclipsed the AC in almost every major metric, and already brings in more money than the Cup; if the AC doesn’t join the rest of the thinking world, it will continue its march to obscurity, gaining more sponsors like Louis Vuitton as it hemorrhages fans.

It’s not that hard if you have half a brain and the tiniest ability to get your head out of the boat; It’s not like you can’t find other inspiration.  From the New York Times:

An average of more than 6.2 million people tuned in live to watch the Billabong Pipe Masters, where Mr. Medina won his first title. Those numbers exceeded the American television audience for the final game of the 2014 Stanley Cup hockey finals. Not a second of the surfing competition was shown on traditional live television in the United States; instead, it was streamed on YouTube, with 35 to 40 percent of its viewers on mobile.

“It was hard for us to realize a direct relationship to linear TV,” Paul Speaker, the chief executive of the World Surf League, said. “We’re a global sport, so there is always a time zone concern, and we have to wait for swells” — suitable wave conditions — “so we don’t have a start time and an end time like other sports.”

The World Surf League’s successful web-first broadcast strategy is at the leading edge of a gradual transformation taking hold in sports television. As more and more viewers move online and audiences become more global, the professional leagues have all adopted streaming as an important way to attract younger fans around the world. But the purity of surfing’s model — reaching millions of viewers online without being beholden to exclusivity contracts with broadcast and cable networks — demonstrates the power of online audiences for sports big and small.

“It’s one of those things where there’s a lot of fans out there,” explained Matt McLernon, a spokesman for YouTube. “But they’re not necessarily combined enough into a media market where it makes sense to put this sporting event on TV. But when anyone can watch it online, you open up a whole concept.”

All of the major sports leagues have embraced this reality. The N.H.L. recently teamed with the camera maker GoPro this year to bring real-time highlights shareable on social media like Twitter and Facebook. The P.G.A. tour is trying something similar with GoPros and the tour’s online network, Skratch TV. The N.B.A. has the biggest YouTube sports audience with 2.5 billion videos viewed, nearly all through highlights. It also streams its “D” League games online, and joined with Tencent to stream N.B.A. games live in China.


August 28th, 2015 by admin

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