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Gunboat 60 sailing in Annapolis, MD.

Posts Tagged ‘11th hour racing’

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2014 Moth US Nationals

Nicky, Hillary, Emma, & Lindsay show off their eco-warrior 11th Hour Racing colors during an all-day postponement at the Moth Nationals.  This mix of wags, volunteers, and moth racers shows us the way to more sustainable regattas – more pics and news on the US Moth Facebook Page.  Meredith Block photo.

 

March 22nd, 2014 by admin

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While organizers struggle with pollution issues for Key West Race Week, 100 miles to the North, entry fees for the first event of the 11th Hour Racing Moth Winter Series were ZERO thanks to the event sponsor, an environmental organization.  That’s not the only innovation from a strong US Moth Class that now features crossovers from not just skiffs and sportboat superstars, but A-Cats and even Sunfish – Matt Knowles checks in with the report from day one in Key Largo, with photos from Marco Oquendo and a full gallery here.

17 International Moths descended on the Upper Keys Sailing Club in Key Largo Florida for the first stop in the 2014 winter series. In connection with its partner 11th Hour Racing, the US Moth Class is hosting a three stop winter tour dedicated to great racing and spreading the message of environmental sustainability. Day 1 was slalom racing in a fresh breeze that was forecast to build to frightening. A few sailors permitted discretion to thwart valor and stayed on the beach.

DSC_3358 - Version 2After a 6-race qualification series plus a repechage, 8 sailors advanced to the grand final. Just as the boats started, a 30 knot gust rolled across the course. In the end, only two boats managed to flimp back upwind to finish: Antony Kotoun (ISV) took the win over new class member Patrick Wilson (USA) who showed impressive boat handling in the big air. Tomorrow the class turns to fleet racing using an America’s Cup reaching start. Full gold fleet results: 1st Anthony Kotoun (Newport, RI); 2nd Patrick Wilson (Charleston, SC); 3rd Johnny Goldsberry (San Fran, CA); 4th Matt Knowles (Newport, RI); 5th Tommy Loughborough (Barrington, RI); 6th Bora Gulari (Detroit, MI); 7th David Loring (Charleston, SC); 8th Ben Moon (St. Pete, FL).

January 4th, 2014 by admin

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Team 11th Hour battles satellite communications issues, giving them a chance to think about how important computers and satellites have become to sailors.  Follow their progress on the course with the online race tracker HERE, and check out their Facebook page or Website.  More from Hannah in today’s TJV report below, and go to the thread  for updates on the exciting Open 60 battle or the intensely dull two-boat MOD 70 race.

Once upon a time sailors went to sea with just a sextant and a barometer to guide them across the oceans (oh and of course some rum), but nowadays we have come to rely on complex computer programs that when fed with high resolution gribfiles of different wind models at different altitudes calculate your optimal route.  We are also spoiled with a wealth of satellite and infra red imagery, wave models and ocean current data that we can download in seconds via our sat comms systems on board.  We would usually get at least 4 grib files a day and on the approach to the equator would be monitoring satellite images to make aninformed decision on the best place to cross the ITCZ.  Unfortunately for us that vital sat comms system that feeds us and our computer with all that important decision making data has decided to go on strike for now, so our forecasting materials have been somewhat down graded.

Instead of having access to the pretty picture to the left, we have 1 sea area text forecast per day which covers an area hundreds of miles across, so no local detail, a barometer and a good old fashioned look at the sky. Right now we are dicing with the Azores high.  We spent most of yesterday getting Westing in and waiting for a bit of a shift to the East which came this evening, and we gybed on it.  Not knowing the exact shape and the detailed behavioral patterns of this high in the next few days is risky, what if we went too far west? What if the high starts moving south? Looking ahead where is the best place to cross the IITCZ right now?

So if you are staring at the tracker wondering why we are going the way we are, well it’s because right now all of you out there at home know more about our optimal route than we do.  We are sailing by feel, the old fashioned way.  Now all we are missing is the daily ration of rum.

November 18th, 2013 by admin

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At 21:54:35 Europe Standard Time (20:54:35 GMT, 15:54:35 Eastern Standard Time) Team 11th Hour rejoined the Transat Jacques Vabre after making an unscheduled pit stop in Lorient, France to repair a failed strop on their forestay. Here’s the story from co-skipper Rob Windsor of a super fast pit stop and hospital visit – thanks to some folks on shore that y’all might have heard of before; check the thread here.

After our forestay detached from our rig, we spent the better part of 30 hours getting to Lorient to try and fix the problem. When we arrived in Lorient we found three people waiting for us on the dock: Ryan Breymeier, a good friend and fellow American short-handed sailor, Yann Le Bretton, prepareteur who we met in Charleston this year at the Atlantic Cup and Yann’s girlfriend who’s name I didn’t catch. As soon as we got to the dock they hopped on board. Ryan had a dock cart full of bits to sort out all of our trouble; a mast jack to jack up the rig so we could fix the forestay problem, vacuum bag material to fix our leaky rudder post, and a bunch of rigging bits to put it all together. On top of all of that they brought 2 large pizzas.

It’s pretty awesome to be in another country, in a harbor you have never been in, pull in with a broken boat (and broken Rob but we will get to that in a minute), see two faces you know smiling at you telling it will all be OK and pull off the dock just 4 hours later with it all fixed. Ryan asked if I was OK because Hannah mentioned that I had hurt myself. So, sometimes I over do it. People that know me will laugh at that because maybe it’s more than sometimes. Anyway, I think I pulled something too hard and both my forearms were swollen and really painful. Anytime I pulled or grabbed something I was in a lot of pain and of course sailing is all about pulling and grabbing so nedless to say, I was suffering. Ryan told me he had spoken to a doctor at the hospital and that I could go to the Emerrgency Room and walk right in. He said there would be no wait and that the doctor would sort me out. I ws thinking no way. I was just in a hospital in France 2 weeks ago getting stitches in my finger and it took 4 hours for 3 stitches. Yann’s giirlfriend took me to the hospital, we walked in and the doctor took me in in less than a minute! They took some blood and spoke a lot of French words I didn’t understnd and told me I pulled tthe tendons in my hands and forearms. They gave me some pills and cream and a splint for one arm and we were out the door in an hour.

When I got back to the boat, all the work was done. All the tools were being put away and they were tossing us our lines. As I write this, I am smiling from ear to ear. We have worked so hard to get here. We will never give up. As of now we are back on the race course, going down wind at about 14 knots! With the help of some friends and some good sailing from us, we will be right bck in this race very soon. Thanks to everyone for your support.”

Follow Team 11th Hour’s progress on the course with the online race tracker HERE.  For more news and information on Team 11th Hour Racing please visit their Facebook page and their Website. Print quality images of Team 11th Hour Racing can be found HERE

 

November 12th, 2013 by admin

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 Every other year, France puts on a massive show for their ‘adventurers’, attracting over a million people to the start of two great races:  the solo Route Du Rhum alternates with the double handed Transat Jacques Vabre, which begins this coming weekend.  Here’s the story from US/UK entry 11th Hour Racing and their former SCOTW skipper Hannah Jenner.
Our Team 11th Hour Class 40 is in Le Havre, France with one week to go to the start of the Transat Jacques Vabre [pronounce it  "Jock Varb" with a soft 'j' to get close]. We have smiled and waved and signed autographs for the public and it now feels REAL! The race to get to the start is over, the lock gates are closed and there is no going back now.  It’s funny how the blood, sweat and tears of the preparation period dissolve into pre race excitement and all of those moments of wondering what on earth you are doing and questioning your crazy career choice are fading into the background.  (Although we may find ourselves revisiting those questions again looking at the forecast for start day.  It seems the weather gods know when its a TJV year and amp up the depressions that crash into this area of the world in November).
I was here in the same spot two years ago sailing on 40 Degrees and two years on I am back in the same boat under a new name and with a new co skipper (Rob Windsor).  This time around though we are streaks ahead in terms of preparation, and rather than the usual frenetic craziness, the atmosphere in the team is happy and relaxed.  After losing our rig in the 2012 Atlantic Cup we have a new and lighter rig, we have shaved weight of the keel, we have re-wired and upgraded the electronics and spent a lot of time training both on and off the water.  Above all, we feel we have a great team.
Having sailed 6,000 miles together this year, most of which have been aboard 11th Hour Racing, we understand what makes each other tick and how to get the best out of the boat.  We have been tired and frustrated and grumpy and we are still talking!  Its a good sign and most importantly we have the same aspirations in our sailing careers, which really helps to focus us when the pressure is on.
So all that is left to do is get through the scrutineering checks, attend the safety briefs and soak up the incredible atmosphere here in Le Havre.  As long as the boat stays attached to its mooring through tonight’s storm we are in great shape and ready to race.  This time around, it’s not about finishing: Our goal is CLEANER FASTER BETTER.
Like Facebook for the most up to date info on the team.

October 29th, 2013 by admin

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Hannah Jenner checks in from the Class 40 Fastnet Race fleet aboard 11th Hour Racing.  Track the fleet here.

BTW – has anyone noticed that the English seem to have given up on ever getting to the finish line of the Fastnet before all the French have finished, eaten, slept, and eaten again?

 

August 14th, 2013 by admin

Gunboat 60 sailing in Annapolis, MD.

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