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A missing nine-year-old boy, whom federal authorities say was kidnapped in by his father from Seattle, has been located and is safe in an island 1,500 miles northeast of New Zealand. according to the FBI.

Jeffrey Hanson, the boy’s non-custodial father, is being detained on the island of Niue, the FBI said. The FBI issued an alert earlier this month advising mariners in the Pacific that Billy Hanson and his father set sail from Seattle on Sept. 4, in a sailboat called “Draco,” and may have sailed to Hawaii, American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, and other Pacific islands.

Federal officials said Hanson is a known drug abuser with a volatile personality. More.

 

October 30th, 2014

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so lonely

Christophe Launay beautifully catches the mood of this voyage, as described by Gilles Morrelle:

Vincent Beauvarlet is a French sailor. If he started his career as a windsurfer, youth world champion in 1990, he discovered offshore sailing quickly (Route du Rhum, Québec St Malo)… Today, three days before the start of La Route du Rhum, he goes on a long journey from Cancale (France close to St Malo, start of the Route du Rhum) to Guadeloupe (French caribbean island, arrival of the Route du Rhum and where he is born 40 years ago) alone onboard a very small  Multi 23 (VPLP Design ) called “Ocean Love Dream”.

If he won’t go as fast as big multihull as Spindrift, 140 feet, Vincent’ll try to make a new record set of the atlantic cross alone and onboard a dinghy multihull. It’s not holidays, it’s adventure. Vincent, take care !” Check all the photos here.

 

October 30th, 2014

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This will be the 9th Archipelago Rally held in the upper reaches of famed Little Narragansett Bay! BBQ food for kids and adults will be on hand at the Watch Hill Boatyard with heated bathrooms, covered picnic area, a beautiful launch ramp and protected pier. Sunday is the Rain Date and that call will be made by Nov. 7 through Paperless Post and to the media outlets.
Anything with a sail is eligible, we will give you a Portsmouth Yard Stick Rating and start lemans style from the pier. Keelboats not recommended unless small like a 110. DON’T FORGET your personal flag to fly from your rig. Prizes and the enviable BROKEN HEAD PERPETUAL TROPHY will be awarded, along with the PINE NEEDLE and LONELY LOON awards!

Bring a six pack, thought there is some beer being provided and all food is provided too with some drink boxes for the young ‘ins. Feel free to bring something fun for the BBQ to share if you’d like, but not essential to sustenance.

Please email with any questions. cmuseler@gmail.com or ezrasmith@yahoo.com or call Chris at 401-835-5406 See you this weekend!

UPDATE 10/30/14: DATE CHANGE to Saturday, NOVEMBER 8!!!! Though we will have three chase boats, if conditions seem beyond your threshold, please come anyway for the party and remember that with about 30-40 boats on the water, there are always more people have a great time on land enjoying food, beverage, rights and music the whole time! – Chris Museler.

 

October 30th, 2014

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solar sails

Innovation is good. Will this particular one work? We’re about to find out…

First Solar Mainsail designed for Offshore Racing. First shake down with the North Atlantic, next Sunday, Route du Rhum starting line. Sails made in Cannes-Mandelieu par Power Sails. Setting of the new pohovoltaic sails tomorrow on board ‘IMOCA 50 “Martinique Challenge” in Saint-Malo, France.

 

October 29th, 2014

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Once again Henry Bomby bring you the dope on the VOR

ice-gate-and-cape-townThe big news of yesterday was the introduction of an ice gate by Race Director Jack Lloyd. Designed to take away the temptation for the teams to dive deep south in the search for better pressure and a better angle to Cape Town. The Ice Gate is placed at 42 deg South between 20W and 10W, seen here.

Over the past few days the weather models are now in better agreement, giving a more reliable forecast and therefore more reliable routing options for the teams. This allows them to commit to a certain path to dive South, although how far South is still unclear. In the screenshot below is an ensemble routing of GFS 1.0 deg, at 0600UT this morning. The top of the red box depicts the ice gate, to be left to Starboard. I made it into a box so it is easier to see.

The addition of the ice gate reduces the options for the teams, which is good news for the front runners and bad news for the teams behind. What we will likely see is the fleet sailing along this ice gate in order to be as far south as possible, in order to make the most of the left shift on Saturday afternoon. Read on.

 

October 29th, 2014

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grand stand

This pic was taken in Houston, Texas (Lakewood YC) at the final Texas Sailing Associationevent of the season. Sunday was very light.  The pic is of 15 year old Katy Hannan from Rush Creek Yacht Club. Photo taken by Gustav Schmiege Photography. Fun!

 

October 28th, 2014

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Haven’t we screamed for years how absolutely fucked ISAF is?

Open Letter to members of ISAF Council:

As you prepare for the ISAF Annual Meeting next week, and knowing that you have something like 215 submissions to consider, it is time to take a pause and give serious consideration to the state of the Disciplinary Commission (DC) and Regulation 35.  Submissions 37, 38, and 39 directly relate to the Disciplinary Commission.  Instead, take a step back, and look at the bigger picture of sailor and race official discipline in a more comprehensive fashion.

The whole problem with the way the DC works starts with the Executive Committee.  It was the Executive Committee who put forth the submission to create the DC.  The Executive Committee set forth the parameters that the DC could write their own rules with exactly zero oversight from either the Executive Committee, or Council.  It was if the Executive Committee allowed the Racing Rules Committee to re-write the racing rules in a vacuum.  As members of the Council it is reasonable to presume you just missed that part when this submission was voted in.  Just like with 215 submissions at the coming AGM, who can be expected to read every line of every submission?  But, as members of Council, you can be certain that when the fur starts flying about what has happened as a consequence of the new disciplinary rules of procedure, and it will, that the Executive Committee and the Staff will point their fingers at you as having approved the opportunity for a handful of people to devise the disciplinary process for the whole sport, with exactly zero oversight.

Then we get to the part about empaneling the DC. Here’s the regulation about the requirements to empanel the DC:

8.15.2  Regulation 8.2 does not apply to the appointment or removal of members of the Commission. Council shall appoint the Chairman, Vice-Chairman and members of the Commission on the nomination of the Executive Committee for a specific term. The membership of the Commission shall include a sufficient number of legally qualified members to enable it to discharge it functions.

Having searched the ISAF Executive Committee minutes I found nothing about the required nomination by the Executive Committee of the DC members.  I later learned that VP Scott Perry was given oversight of the DC working party.  It seems what happened is that somehow the some members of (maybe all?) DC working party were put forth as the interim members of the DC.  I asked Perry if he did this on his own, or if the ISAF staff did it without his knowledge.  He has to date refused to answer my question.

However, ISAF in-house counsel jon napier responded to this question.  He said that as a matter of Executive Committee work process Perry was assigned oversight of the DC, and therefore his recommendation constituted nomination.  That is a pretty weak premise, particularly because nothing about the nomination comporting to the Regulations shows up in the Minutes of the Executive Committee.  Ever. Anywhere. Read on.

 

October 28th, 2014

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Big Pimpin’

tacking battleTacking battles are among the most exciting elements of a sailing regatta. This excitement is also brought by a new regatta game.

This is a tactician’s game.  You can tack, head up, bear off and virtually do everything to cover and control the competitor.  The player can force the competitor to unwanted tacking and try to catch the wind shifts to his own advantage.  However, the virtual competitor also knows the rules: if he approaches with the right of way, you have to avoid him.

The game is a zigzag course and the goal, of course, to be the first to cross the finish line so as to advance to the next of the seven levels.

This app is available at the Apple App Store for iPhone and iPad, and at the Google Play Store for Android.  The versions for the MAC App Store and Windows App Store are in preparation.  Currently, the app is available in German, English, Italian, French, Spanish and Russian. $ 1.99 will be charged for the download. Have at it!

 

October 28th, 2014

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God damn, we don’t know which we like better, the boat or the song. Props to Anarchist Nat.  Wanna know exactly how much she cost to build?  So do we, especially after reading this CNN piece!

 

October 28th, 2014

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Screen Shot 2014-10-28 at 12.44.46 PMCrewing: Phil Toth tells us how to do it right.  Got questions?  E-mail him.

There have been loads written about winning from the perspective of how to be a great helmsman or a brilliant tactician. Practice a bit, win the start, hit the first shift and extend from there. What could be more simple….right?  Truth is that from the lofty, exalted position of helmsman or tactician, it may appear to the gods in the back of the boat that sails get trimmed perfectly each and every time, and the crew still have the time to clean everything up and scramble across the boat and hike after maneuvers like mark roundings.

I have been sailing on the Olympic circuit almost full-time over the last 8 years both in the Finn and the Star, and they It really opened my eyes on how important the crew is! Many of the top Star crews in the world can swap and change drivers, it does not matter who is steering behind us we can still win. Many of them have gone on to be highly sought after crews in other classes such as the Dragon, Etchells, Melges 20, Volvo, Americas Cup and TP52s etc. Good crew will have a set of base set of skills that will really work successfully in any class!

Team Work- Good crew are people that can work well and constructively in a team. The last thing a driver or tactician needs is someone in the middle of the boat chirping away second guessing there every move. It wrecks their confidence and only creates turmoil and frustration on the boat. Everyone needs to know their job and the strengths and weaknesses of the others. Make sure that you can back up the person beside you, if they don’t fail in their job neither will you. Always be positive and say only what needs to be said and only that which will move the boat forward to a better position. Never give up and never stop sailing at 100% till you cross the finish line. Many regattas are decided by a single point. Being a good crew means you get everything done even if it’s just coiling a line before the gybe…most of it will happen in the back ground and no one will notice. It is often when nothing happens (the spin sheets don’t get knotted and screw up the gybe) that it means you’re doing your job right. Debrief after each race to talk about how to improve for the next one.

Compass- I sail a lot of small boats that do not have the fancy electronics that give you all the wind and speed info. I have found that a compass is all that you really need. The fancy stuff is nice to have for sure, and I will use it to confirm what I already know from the compass. No matter if it is a new digital compass or an old school one it will help you figure out when there is a shift, the favored end of the line, or the wind heading. When crewing I will keep track of the boat heading (as I know the tactician is too) so that I know when there has been a shift and I can then be ready for any maneuver to take advantage of the shift that just happened. Keeping track like this will keep you a step ahead of the boat. It will help you keep your head in the game tactically as well as inform others on the crew that there is a maneuver likely soon and to be prepared when the tactician calls for it.

Read On.

 

October 28th, 2014

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twin peaks

As the days grow short, foiling Great Cup 32 sailors grow impatient, and last weekend, both the Hungarian team and the shiny new American team took advantage of autumn breeze to go record-hunting…

On Friday, Hungarian team RSM DTM (owned by Zsolt Kalocsai) smashed the ‘cross Lake Balaton’ record – also known as the Hungarian Sea – previously held by the Pauger P50 double masted cat.  The GC32 took less than two hours to complete the 49 NM course, and their time of 1h57m shaves almost a half hour, or more than 25% of the time off the long-standing record. Sure it was cold, but nothing warms like victory…and rum.   5000 miles away, the first-ever US-based GC32 Argo also had a strong first weekend despite landing a week earlier in Newport straight from the builder in Dubai.  As a Moth racer, two-boat Melges 32 campaigner, past M32 World Champ, and high-performance monohull guy, new owner Jason Caroll finally came over to the dark side with the GC32, and he didn’t waste any time.  Their first assault was the Around Jamestown Island Record and not because the season victor takes home his weight in rum.  Well, not entirely.  Thanks to its location just a few miles from the yachting wonders of Newport this record gets constantly attacked by some of the world’s best sailors, so it makes sense that it was a major goal for the Newport-based Argo team.  And attack they did: On just their third day sailing the boat, Argo notched the first sub-1 hour time ever recorded for the busy record.

IMG_2148With 16-22 knots from the West, Argo hit a top speed of over 37 knots enroute to a new record of 58 minutes and change for the AJIR, and here is the report from Argo program manager Chad Corning.

All it took was a two-day test session in La Baule, France last month for Jason to press ‘GO’ on a GC 32 of his own.  These boats are truly next-level stuff, with balanced power, adjustability and top end speeds that defy belief.  Our immediate goal would be the around Jamestown Island record which had been set in perfect conditions earlier this year by the Marstrom 32 Bronco.  

Once all the bits had arrived in Newport from around the globe, we had just four days to build the boat with Jim, Mischa, Macca and Mikey all working huge days to get it done.  We made it into the water Friday, and had a three day window to work to take a crack at the record.  

Conditions were fairly benign as we worked the boat up, but we still topped 30 knots of boat speed.  We took a stab at a lap of the island, but inconsistent pressure and a sub-optimal direction left us with a 1:20 time – 17 minutes short of glory.  Saturday was another great day with a near-vertical learning curve going and another bump in top speed to 33 knots.  Our attempt time came out about the same as Friday, as conditions remained just too light to get it done.  

Everyone was licking their chops though as we looked at the forecast for Sunday.  Fresh westerlies were on tap which would make for reaching on both long legs of the course – perfect.     IMG_2163Sunday dawned with more wind than forecast but from the right direction.  GAME ON!

A quick test run prior to starting proved that the boat was a absolute beast in the breeze-on conditions.  The first leg out to Beavertail was slightly cracked from upwind on starboard and we skimmed or foiled at 16-18 knots.  A quick tack and we were off on a broad reach down the back side of the island, a condition that the GC 32 likes, to say the least.  Our hair was fully on fire on this leg, though we had to take a two minute pit stop at the north tip of the island to repair the rudder down line which had broken.  After nailing a jibe it was all on to the finish.   The moment of the day came when we rode a big lifting puff to 37 knots of boatspeed.  With board-flat water, the boat just wanted to go, and we all foresaw a 40-knot ride.  But the puff faded, and as we neared the Newport Bridge, the boat dug its nose in heavily.  With the port foil hitting a lobster pot, the horizontal element of the foil quickly became vertical at 30+ knots and the bottom half cleanly sheared away.  With the record in hand, we low-rode into the finish eventually stopping the clock at 58 minutes and 31 seconds, the first sub 1-hour lap of the island.   On board for the record – Jason Carroll, Mischa Heemskerk, Cameron Appleton, Mike Kuschner, Michael Barnes and Chad Corning while Andrew Macpherson from GC and our boat captain Jim “Grande” Condon manned the chase boat.  Team Argo has a lot to learn in this new world, but our first taste was extremely satisfying.    

The Argo GC32 heads south for the winter and will be joined by more GC32′s from Europe for some winter foiling – we’ll have some more news on that program soon.  Short vid of the Opti fleet flyby here, and a bit of post-crash non-foiling here.

October 28th, 2014

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VOR

The fans who follow us at home now think, why the hell have the guys choose this strange route yesterday,” says Bouwe Bekking with a sour face. Sitting on the little bench he stares into the navigation screen of Andrew Cape. It is a dark hole, and the only source of light is the small computer screen. “We clearly sail the wrong way,” he continues.

As always, there was once again a thought behind this tactical move of Bekking & Co. Team Brunel was sailing 400 miles off the Brazilian coast to the south. Directly ahead for the Dutch team was a huge high pressure area. Bekking: “There is virtually no wind here. Think of it as a concrete wall. It’s impossible to break.”……. Read on.

 

October 28th, 2014

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401335_372899099493029_2121992649_nWith the Vanguard 15 class in continuing decline, team racing Midwinters was cancelled this year, so Eckerd College Anarchists Kevin and Zach stepped up to do something about it, and Zach sent us a little note: “We know a ton of team race fans read Sailing Anarchy, and we’re hoping you can help us spread the word.”  Consider it spread. 

If you are bummed that the V-15 midwinters are dead, or if you never sailed the V-15 midwinters because you don’t have a boat, then come sail the first ever Eckerd Open Team Race hosted by Eckerd College on Dec 31- Jan 2. What could be better than some 3-on-3 action in warm Florida during the dead of winter?  We’re providing the boats, the dates have been setup not to conflict with Orange Bowl, and entry is dirt-cheap.  We’ve partnered with the beachfront Post Card Inn for an awesome regatta dinner and special regatta rates, and they are stoked to have us join in their New Year’s festivities! Bonus: No NYE driving!

Finally, we’ve got six Zim 15s to race; this will allow us to take more entries, and competitors will have a chance to get to know the boat used at the Hinman Teamrace.

 

Registration is now open and available online – please go there to register!

 

October 28th, 2014

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Down in the lowly depths of the Southern Hemisphere (Cape Town), we’ve recently started a new program. The ex ‘Flirt’/'Cape Fling’ now called ‘Nitro’ has been putting in some effort.

We sailed in a corporate event on the weekend. Effectively 40% of the crew are guests/non-sailors. The Saturday was blown out as it was blowing 25 to 30 knots (typical Cape Doctor). However, we took the guests for a burn and the just loved it!

- Anarchist Will.

 

October 27th, 2014

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big pimpin’

PH-JOY-2014MSC_116We’d like to welcome our friends at Melges back for another year of pimpin’, and the timing couldn’t be better; there’s all sorts of exciting fall/winter action going on across the Melges fleets, and we’re going to help highlight just how fun and accessible it can be.  Here’s some news from the M32 fleet in Florida, and watch for a feature from Jaime Torres soon on the M32 Caribbean Fleet.  For everything Melges, check their site.

With a fleet and sailors diverse as the nightlife on Ocean Avenue, the Melges 32 Gold Cup kicks off in just two weeks, featuring 18 ultra-high performance Melges 32 teams from 9 different countries.

This “Florida Classic” will decide not only the new Gold Cup titleholder; it will serve as the final notice for teams looking to challenge for the ultimate goal: the Melges 32 World Title. Louisiana skipper Chris Wientjes (Stormvogel, Metairie, LA) can’t wait for it all to begin. “The Melges 32 Class always brings great talent to its events, but there’s no doubt these two will bring some of the best sailors in the world to Miami,” he said. “We’re really looking forward to testing ourselves in both the Gold Cup and Worlds.”

It may have started as a low-key tune-up regatta in the Melges 32’s fledgling days in 2006, but the Gold Cup has emerged as the longest-standing Melges 32 regatta on the annual calendar. Regularly featuring more than 20 teams – from the highest-level international two-boat programs to more modest but still ultra-competitive local and Caribbean teams – winning the Gold Cup has historically required great boat speed and teamwork along with a strong understanding of tricky autumn breezes and meandering Gulf Stream current and waves.

2012 World Championship runner-Up Alec Cutler (Hedgehog, Bermuda) recognizes the balancing act between sailing hard at the Gold Cup without tipping his hand for the upcoming Worlds a month later. “Gold Cup may be a Worlds tune up, but it is also a coveted trophy for our team,” said Cutler. “Our goal is to hold off from some of the big decisions until after Gold Cup while racing hard, having a good time, and learning the venue.”

Read on.

 

October 27th, 2014

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adios 1

Last Friday in central port of Lavrio, Greece with winds >40kts. A ferry got loose causing a great mess! – Anarchist FastButNotFurious.

 

October 27th, 2014

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A follow-up on the Olympia man overboard story, with a sad, tragic ending…

missingA sailor missing since Saturday was found dead on Sunday, the Thurston County Sheriff’s Office said. Rescue crews were searching for the 46-year-old man in the water after a sailboat overturned in Puget Sound, about four miles north of Olympia on Saturday.

The Thurston County Sheriff’s Office said the boat was taking part in the Eagle Islands Race, a sanctioned sailboat race put on by the South Sound Sailing Society. A 22-foot fiberglass sailboat was in the 25th mile when it capsized due to extremely high winds and 8 to 10 foot waves.

Two people were rescued from the water within 10 to 15 minutes after the boat capsized by other boats in the race. The third person attempted to get into another boat but couldn’t make it due to the high waves and the boat being tossed about.

The man was wearing a Coast Guard approved life vest. The man’s body was found in Case Inlet, near Herron Island. Rescue teams from the Thurston County Sheriff’s Office and the Coast Guard were on scene shortly after the 911 call. The Coast Guard provided a 45-foot patrol boat and a helicopter. Article courtesy K5 tv, photo is of the Coast Guard search.

 

October 27th, 2014

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Now this is good. Really good! props to Anarchist Moray.

 

October 26th, 2014

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An exclusive for you Anarchists from one of our all-time favorite sailors, Bouwe Beking onboard Tean Brunel in the Volvo Ocean Race

Nearly two weeks on the water, time flies. Are we happy? Yes, we have 9 content inmates on-board teambrunel. Now don’t get me wrong, this jail is not bad at all, but we are missing terrible the news from the rest of the world. I realize we all have become cyber junkies. What is the first thing you do when at home waking up, right check you mail, while you brew a cup of coffee in the mean time for your better half , although she does that most for me-:) .

The 2nd thing I do is checking SA’s website for any gossip or stories and the 3rd thing is checking the news. Now all of that is nearly impossible, SA articles are out of the question. But also we can’t email directly to who we want, we have to go through a allocated person in our shorecrew and have to cc race committee in. The same for making phone calls, I can’t just pick up the phone and call my wife, I need to ask permission. Feels like Big Brother is watching us. But the sailing is fantastic and the racing has been close although terrible slow. The Arabs still show us their stern as they did a better job than us in the last 48 hours.

Sailing under jib we are not very flash, we have seen that now on several occasions ,we hang in, but we just don’t seem to have any height compare to the others. The sails should be all one design, so theoretical it can’t be that, maybe the rig set-up is not right or it is the way we are trimming, But we have no issues when other sails are up. Having the AIS compulsory switched on, changed the game completely.

The first 7 days when we were relatively slow and boats doing similar speeds, you needed one person permanent looking at the screen, observing the competition. The fun part of making moves at night time has dissapeared , as others can react immediately. So it was nice when the breeze picked up and speed differences where more obvious plus a chance to pick up on sleep as monitoring stopped when more than 7 miles apart. We stuck to our game plan and that has paid off, but this race is far from over, even the guys and chicks miles behind us, will have an opportunity to get back into the game, as we will sail in less breeze.

Not to speak about cutting the corner, you get it right you can shave easy a couple of hundreds miles of the route to CPT. Anyway right now we feel better to be one of the front runners than be in chasing pack.

Cheers, Bouwe

Comment on this article!

 

 

October 26th, 2014

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bobsie twins

Christophe Launay gets us psyched for the Saint Malo Route du Rhum.

 

October 26th, 2014

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