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ass man

Comanche’s child-rearing hips vs. Wild Oats XI’s svelte pooper as shot by SA’er ‘wildboats!”: Could there be a better illustration of what to expect in just 25 days?  Great shot and plenty more from the fanboy thread.

 

December 1st, 2014

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Screen Shot 2014-12-01 at 9.48.41 AMThere’s a huge weight off our shoulders this week, because we’ve finally reached inner peace about the America’s Cup.  Our realization has urged us to share the following note.  Title inspiration from the Specials.

Dear Larry and Ernesto:

We wanted you to know that we are genuinely sorry about the way we’ve treated both of you.  At the times we criticized both of you for your illogical, backwards, seemingly insane decisions about America’s Cup issues, we failed to understand just how poisonous the Cup is.  Worse yet, we failed to realize that we’d been infected, too.

We’ve compared the past two holders of the Cup as infected by ownership of the Cup just as Lord of the Ring’s Gollum was infected by ‘The Precious,’ and little did we know that its effect extends far beyond physical contact.  That same force – let’s call it Dyscuptopia -  that caused otherwise wildly successful entrepreneur/sailors to so perfectly fail in their grandiose goals actually led us to believe that the America’s Cup had some sort of duty to the wider sport in the USA.  When we chased the first wing-sailed Cup boat in history all over San Diego, when we broadcast live talk shows from the BMR Oracle compound in Valencia, and when we snuck onstage to hold the Cup after it was wrestled away from Bertarelli’s willd plans, we became invested.  And more importantly, infected.

Sure, Larry, your and Russell’s very vocal plans to revolutionize the public face of sailing while bringing in millions in revenue helped lead us down this primrose path, where we walked along with sponsorship directors, the governments of several municipalities and various nongovernmental organizations.  But we’re Sailing Anarchy – the site that prides itself on brutal honesty, run by a couple of the most jaded, cynical bastards anyhere.  We should have known better.

Instead, we got mad, and until the other day, we stayed that way.  Mad when the USA got rapidly washed out of the US Team.  Mad when poor recruiting snowballed into a failed media push.  Mad at the secrecy and opacity rife in the event, magnified by the continuing silence more than a year since Bart’s death.  And mostly, mad at the incredible wealth spent on the San Francisco Cup while almost nothing went to the marketing, sustainability or infrastructure of the sport that makes it all possible; a wasted opportunity in a nation that’s lost three quarters of its sailing population over the past 30 years.

When Bernie Wilson broke the Bermuda venue story last week, we started to write a typically scathing editorial and planned a trip to the December 2nd Press Conference.  We’d put Russell’s feet to the fire in front of hundreds of journalists, we would!  And then we thought about it for a second, and wondered why we gave even the tiniest shit.  And that’s when we knew it wasn’t a logical reaction, rather, it was the dreaded Dyscuptopia, which we’ll define as ‘the unshakeable conviction that the afflicted can and must use the America’s Cup for some incredibly grand purpose.’

When the fog cleared, we realized that Larry doesn’t owe anyone a goddamned thing.  It’s his Cup, it’s his regatta, and if his top employee wants to make a sustainable America’s Cup in Bermuda, more power to him.  And to be perfectly frank, it shouldn’t be that fucking hard, as long as everyone cuts their expectations by about 90%.  The Extreme Sailing Series and World Match Race Tour have proved that a combination of venue fees and hospitality/b-to-b sponsorship can fund solid racing series.  All you have to do is make the boats cheap enough and have sponsorship hunters that are slick enough, and repeat as needed.

So with a final sigh, we shrug off our Dyscuptopia, and close the chapter on our criticism and legal analysis of the commercialization, litigation, and Russel-ization of the Oracle America’s Cups.  We will certainly not hide from reporting on the inevitable screwups, boondoggles, or the public’s continued loss of interest, but our anger is gone, and we’ve accepted that the America’s Cup will never be what it could be.

And we’ll be on Bermuda’s beautiful Great Sound to watch some catamaran racing – all thanks to Larry and Russell.  And we’ll be watching tomorrow’s press conference from the warmth of South Beach.

 

December 1st, 2014

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windless

There’s plenty of telephoto distortion in this shot from Alvimedica, but from where we’re sitting, it’s not looking promising for an easy return to the Volvo Ocean Race for the extremely hard aground Team Vestas Wind.  Head over to their Facebook Page to tell them they are not alone.

 

November 29th, 2014

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Silently she glides toward the Harbour City, with one aim: Beat the mighty WOXI.  Game on.

 

November 29th, 2014

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The bad news is above, courtesy of an Amory Ross/Team Alvimedica photo of the Alvi ship’s log as the young guns stood by to assist the stricken Vestas Wind. Their entry, “Starboard side of vessel broken away” is, well, self-explanatory – but note that they are a fair bit away from the grounded boat, so don’t go writing the blue boat off just yet.

The good news comes from VOR Race Control, who has confirmed that the crew has now been rescued and will stay on the Íle du Sud, where there is a house and some facilities. All the crew is safe and nobody is injured.  Team Vestas Wind is making plans with Volvo Ocean Race on how to transport the crew off the island as well as how to salvage the boat, and Team Alvimedica has now been released and will continue racing towards Abu Dhabi.

As for the news we don’t have yet:  Now that Nico’s crew is safe, he and VOR will need to assess what can be done with several million Euro worth of racing yacht, and right quick as she is being beaten by swell and a reef.  Can she be hauled off the reef and then plucked out of the water by a container ship like Puma was last time around, or is she in too dire a shape?   Can she be temporarily fixed somewhere nearby?  And more importantly, will this team be able to rejoin the race?

And then there is the toughest question of all, and the one that several million sailors around the world are now asking: How could one of the most experienced race crews anywhere, with a multiple round-the-world veteran navigating, run into a charted island at 18 knots – an island that’s more or less on the rhumb line to the finish.  The mind boggles…

Big thanks to Team Alvimedica and the folks at VOR HQ for keeping the information more or less flowing.  The more that gets out there, the less we’ll all guess.

 

November 29th, 2014

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Team Alvimedica Navigator Will Oxley shares this update from on board:

We are in contact with Vestas every 30 minutes on VHF radio whilst we wait for dawn at which time the local coast guard should be able to help effect a rescue. Meanwhile I am sure it is great for them to know we are standing by and ready to intersect their life rafts when they reach deep enough water for us to safely navigate in should they abandon at night.

Our sails are down and we are motoring back and forth on the lagoon side of the reef remaining as close as possible to the crew of Vestas Wind while they require assistance. We cannot get closer than about 1.8 miles to them because they are hard on the reef but in the event they abandon to the rafts we may be able to help with recovery. We may also be required to help after rescue but we await advice on this.

For all practical purposes we are no longer racing towards Abu Dhabi for now, but we have not suspended racing. However, in accordance with the laws of the sea, and Racing Rules of Sailing Fundamental Rule 1.1 we are standing by Vestas “to give all possible help to any person or vessel in danger.”

The guys on Vestas are our mates and many of us have sailed 1000’s of miles with them. We will remain with them as long as it is possible we may be able to help.”

 

November 29th, 2014

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VOR BREAKING

groundedUPDATE 2145 UTC:

Volvo Race Control is on an hourly comms schedule with Vestas Wind.  BOTH RUDDERS are broken and the team has reporting water ingress in the stern compartment – one of two watertight compartments on the boat.  Team Alvimedica is standing by, and a small coast guard station on the nearby Isle de Sud is standing by with a RIB to help the crew off Vestas at first light; that’s in just four hours.  Too early to talk about salvage and the rest of Chris Nicholson’s race, but just enough time for the speculation and under-bus-throwing to begin.  We’re hoping there was some major electronic issue aboard Vestas that led to this navigational catastrophe; the alternative is too hard to fathom.

UPDATE 2: In the ‘you just can’t write this shit’ department, Volvo Ocean Race HQ posted one of Vestas OBR Brian Carlin’s underwater photos on Instagram just hours before the boat hit the bricks; the caption?  “Look Out Below!”

Saturday, November 29, Team Vestas Wind informed Race Control that their boat was grounded on the Cargados Carajos Shoals, Mauritius, in the Indian Ocean. Fortunately, no one has been injured.

We are in contact with the boat to establish the extent of the damage and ensure the crew is given the support needed to enable it to deal with the situation.
The Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre (MRCC) in Reunion Island is aware of the problem.

The crew has informed us that it is currently grounded on a reef but nobody is injured. Volvo Ocean Race and Team Vestas Wind’s top priority is to make sure the crew is safe.

The crew has informed Race organisers that it now plans to abandon the boat as soon as possible after daybreak. Team Alvimedica and two other vessels are in contact with Team Vestas Wind to assist. We will give you more information as it becomes available. Jump in for more.

 

 

November 29th, 2014

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Community

Dr. Mikkel  here,  reporting from the Oceans of Hope as we sail away from a few days in charming Charleston, SC. We are heading south in search of new adventures and more heat – someone turned the thermostat down in New York, which reminded us to migrate. We had an amazing five day stopover in New York with our big orange boat the sole resident in North Cove Marina who, along with the excellent Manhattan Yacht Club, hosted our stay. Our arrival there was covered by CBS who went national with the story and our message of inspiration and hope for people who live with MS tumbled into the dinnertime viewing of a wide US audience, which is simply brilliant. Our recent MS crews, which have included numerous Americans, have loved every minute – sailing in past the Statue of Liberty; berthing under the unique Manhattan skyline; a welcome reception at the NYYC (very nice too); a visit to the worlds largest MS Care Centre (The Tisch Center); a guided tour of the New York Stock Exchange (we prefer our type of floating) and the myriad of sound, bustle, noise and smells (mostly chilli dogs) that is New York.

We took dozens of local people living with MS sailing out in the harbour, introducing them to a world beyond their shores and, thankfully, avoided the first winter snow – especially as we stay aboard the boat in port. We had the best imaginable Manhattan apartment, though it rolled around somewhat when the ferries start at 0530hrs!

Heading south, our next port of call was beautiful downtown Charleston where we have had another MS crew change. Hatteras to Charleston was rugged as we punched through the cold front that brought NY state its recent major cold snap. 45 knots on the nose and heavy seas gave us a real work-out and gave some of our fledgling sailors a true taste of offshore sailing – they were all brilliant and an inspiration to us all.

One after another the crew went down with seasickness, the strongest enemy at sea. It makes you lose concentration and the strength to do what is necessary. Indeed, it challenges you more than anything else at sea. This is when true character shows. Not whether you get seasick or not, this is not for you to decide, but how you deal with it. It would be natural if people in such a miserable state would start bickering at each other, complaining or create an atmosphere of fear and discomfort. But none of this happened. Maybe because these people are used to dealing with losing control over their body once in a while. I experienced a sense of acceptance and persistence. Just simply holding on – and waiting. Those who could, helped those who couldn’t.

Our American adventure has been incredible so far – the warmth of the greetings and the interest in our crew and what we are doing has been so strong. We are very grateful.

The big city lights of New York have been traded for a starry sky. We like both, but anyone can visit New York – we are some of the lucky few that can spend nights at sea under the celestial blanket.

Charleston has provided some real southern comfort for everyone abut now we head off again, bound for a stopover in Fort Lauderdale where we will be berthed at the Bahia Mar Marina from December 3rd-8th and introducing more local people with MS to the challenge and the joys of sailing.

Dr. Mikkel Anthonisen, Oceans of Hope.

 

November 29th, 2014

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It’s sure got a cool paint job. So what is it?

 

November 28th, 2014

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Big Pimpin’

white black bannerThe Whitecaps Marine Outfitters Black Friday SALE starts NOW! Don’t miss out on some great holiday deals now until December 5th. In addition to our 10 Day Sale event, we will be having some 1 Day limited specials between now and Christmas including some “doorbusters” on Black Friday and Cyber Monday.

Did you find a better price somewhere else? We will happily price match!* Give us a call at (888) 994-4832 or email us at info@whitecapsmarine.com and we would be happy to help. Don’t forget to LIKE the Whitecaps Marine Outfitters Facebook page so make sure you can stay up to date!

As always, we offer FREE SHIPPING on all US orders. No minimums, no coupons – just simple free shipping.

 

November 28th, 2014

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group-boat

The rest of the world may see Thanksgiving as skivin’ off work and eating all day, but in an increasingly secular life it’s become something far more.  For most Americans, the harvest holiday gives us a little time to reflect on all the people and things that made our life better that year, those that deserve our thanks.  And so we share that with you.  Along with a picture we feel encompasses the spirit of giving, thanks to the interwebs.

To the millions of you spanning all corners of the globe – those who share our passion for the sometimes ridiculous, often enthralling, and occasionally sublime sport we all love – We thank you for enjoying it with us.

To the tens of thousands of you inside our strong Anarchist forum community, Sailing Anarchy thanks you for making us laugh, cry, and love, and sharing some of your most important moments with us.

To the thousands of you who contribute stories, photos, videos, legal funding, tips, scoops, and little nods of encouragement when we see you on the dock, Sailing Anarchy thanks you for giving us the power and the strength to carry on in the face of adversity. We believe our community has been helping to move sailing in positive directions over the decade and a half that we’ve been the insider’s go-to website, and we won’t quit.

To the hundreds of you corporate types who make the decisions to spend your hard-earned money to help us keep the lights on, Sailing Anarchy thanks you for your trust. Unlike most sailors, to you the sport is your livelihood, and we’re grateful you let us speak to our readers on your behalf.

And to the few dozen of you who really help us keep this place relevant and rollin’: The core writers, videographers, photographers, PR people, designers, builders, riggers, critics, event organizers, sponsorship specialists, project managers, coaches, pro racers and others who help us steer our coverage towards the things you feel need exposure, Sailing Anarchy thanks you for your commitment. Your plotting, planning, brainstorming, and hard work bringing the excitement of this sport to the world is bearing fruit. Keep it up and the next decade will finally reverse the trends of the past three, bringing millions of new faces to sailing over the next decade.  You know who you are, and we thank you for your courage.

To all sailors everywhere, we wish you and your families the happiest, healthiest, and safest harvest possible.  Happy Thanksgiving!

November 28th, 2014

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No words needed.  Have a great weekend!

 

November 28th, 2014

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the pointy end

SCOTW Sarah Niedzwiecki-Mecoy. Ladies day race,  Cape town 2014, Yacht Vulcan GP42, Pic credit Dave Mabin.

 

November 27th, 2014

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Screen_Shot_2014-11-26_at_20.16.33Props to Dongfeng Race Team for keepin’ it real and sharing yet another breakage from the Charles Caudrelier-led team.  Mast track troubles disclosed a few minutes ago add to their earlier padeye shatter and rudder breakage to give the French/Chinese team the early rep as the fleet’s boatbreakers.  As Harry Hogge said, “Loose is fast, and on the edge of control.”  Or it could just be bad luck.  Read about the mast track failure – an issue that can have major repercussions for the leg – and how they’re coping with it in this excellent entry from Dongfeng’s blog.

In any case, the bulk of the fleet is almost comically close together, swapping places just like NASCARs on the high banks.  There have been close Volvo legs in the past, but 6 boats separated by a handful of miles this far up the course?  NFW.

Track ‘em, chat about it, and watch videos here.

 

November 26th, 2014

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minitransitBob Salmon ignored the hundreds of people who told him he was crazy. He ignored rules, convention, and tradition. He knew it was possible, and along with the folks at the Penzance Sailing Club, he drug the Mini Class and Mini-Transat Race into existence.  It remains today one of the most respected and extreme races in the world, and without Bob, it wouldn’t exist.  Rest in peace, Anarchist.

Lots of background at the PZSC over here, where we got the pic, too.  For a 2012 interview with Salmon and some ancient footage, click here.  Here’s a little more from our friends at Adonnante.

 

November 26th, 2014

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Screen Shot 2014-11-26 at 12.52.42 PMWe apologize to all the round-the-world fans for our continued slacking as our Senior Editor works on his comprehensive look at the renovated Volvo Ocean Race.  In the meantime, the Anarchists continue to get creative with the free tracking data that VOR HQ is sending out to the world.  There are constantly new bits of pretty colors to look at, and some of them are even useful – how’d you like to know polars for every boat in the fleet?

True, the data on the left isn’t all that accurate – it’s based on single 3-hour tracker data readings after all – but in a race that will probably be decided by boat lengths, the more information available to the fans, the better.  As long as they keep coming up with cool ways to display it!

The Polar on the right comes from SA’er “Volodia”, who has been propogating the simple but solid tracker many of us have been using to measure distances amongst the fleet.  Also active has been SA’er “C Hawk”, who built an entire ‘Public Tableau” experimental dashboard recently, featuring a wide variety of graphs, charts, and diagrams that document all sorts of interesting facts about the Volvo fleet.

Of course these developers are limited to the public data available, and we hope the VOR folks continue to add more of it to the stream.  But for now, these crowd-sourced tools are a must-see for anyone as dug into the race as we are.  So use ‘em.

UPDATE:  We’ve just learned about two new crowdsource data sites – here’s a map/tracker, and here are more data displays.

 

November 26th, 2014

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You might remember when we brought you a week of insane live-streamed video from the first-ever M32 Worlds in Porto Cervo back in what now seems like 1950.  With the class going way too exclusive for the past few years and SA staying far away from the inevitable mess, it’s easy to forget how integrated we were with the M32 Class back when it was roaring into big success.  And quite frankly, we missed it.

But there’s a new sheriff in town in the Melges 32 Class, and he tells us things have changed for the better, and more importantly, they’ve invited us down to Miami Beach to prove it.  We’re told the things we always loved about the class are back in force – the incredible excitement and competitiveness of the racing, the cameraderie of the skippers, amateur, and pro crews, and the laid-back and fun attitude that prevails even at a major World Championship.

We’ve got daily highlight reels and recaps on tap (with the help of kiteboarder Gretta Kruesi presenting), as well as live video updates throughout the Worlds from Clean, daily photo galleries from the inimitable Carlo Borlenghi, and there’s even talk of a long-awaited live talk show…be sure to watch this page for more, and follow the Melges 32 Facebook Page for up-to-the-minute reality from South Beach beginning next Monday.  Find out who’s competing over here.

 

November 26th, 2014

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backyard

Anybody got the skinny on this one?

 

November 26th, 2014

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From the Cap

Nearly a week onboard the fine vessel Team Brunel, time flies. Is it as we expected? Yes and no: some really nice days just after we left Capetown, blasting along, always pushing, but knowing you are in full
>control, it was the kind of sailing why we love this race. Now doing the less interesting part of the job, bashing upwind in 25 knots, wet on deck, several difficult sail changes,because of the unpleasant seastate. Once down below it is not much better as it is getting sticky warm. Some of us produce plenty of “gas”as a result of our delicious freeze dried food and with the hatches closed it smells like a pig farm.

By now we know by smell who are the offenders, no way to hide. Also have been running the engine nearly continuously since we left, as we try to to burn the excess fuel we had to take for this leg. We had to leave Capetown with a required full tank of diesel and knowing roughly long this leg is going to take, the excess burning goes terrible slow , but adds the extra couple of degrees of temperature down below. But even with that we are all smiles, a good bunch of guys, doing what we like: sailing and competing.

Cheers,

Bouwe Bekking

 

November 26th, 2014

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Local Knowledge

We’ve had an early cold snap here in the Pacific Northwest, distressing for those who’d prefer to ease into winter, but tantalizing to we who love to skim across frozen surfaces powered by the breeze. It was below freezing here in Spokane for nearly two weeks, but it wasn’t quite enough to produce usable ice. But the Flathead Valley was typically five to ten degrees cooler, with some nighttime temps near zero, enough to freeze Smith Lake, west of Kalispell, six inches thick! Phil spotted it, put the word out, and he and John proceeded to rip it up day after day. I had to wait til the following Thursday to break free of work, loaded up the Fed, and trundled off to the mountains.

I arrive early afternoon, and meet John at the launch. The predicted wind is a no show, but it’s sunny, still cool, and we strap on the skates and scout the lake. Numerous dead heads sticking thru the ice at the east end, and some open water where Ashley Creek exits the lake. We return to the rigs, break out chairs and beers to await some pressure. We eventually get a tiny bit, maybe two to three knots of breeze. John, with his World Championship boat and commensurate skill, gets her hooked up occasionally, teasing her into the teens, thanks to the hard and fast ice. I make a few desultory attempts, extremely doubtful of my chances, and a few times I can keep my steed rolling, but just barely. And as soon as the tiny puff vaporizes, I’m sittin’ still. We hang til near sunset, ever optimistic, but leave unrewarded.

Friday noon we try again, with similar results, even less wind, if that’s possible. So we again skate the perimeter, armed with fluorescent flagging tape and wands to mark the hazards. Don’t wanna be finding these things at speed! In the end, another nice day outside in the winter, just no adrenaline on tap.
I retire to the cabin in Rollins, lights out sometime after ten, only to be awakened at eleven by the predicted warm front arriving like a freight train! Breeze on! I return to slumber slightly giddy. Up at seven, it’s 35 degrees and still blowin’ hard! We’re on the ice by 10:30, rigging. Phil’s the first one to launch with his 4 meter kite, and he’s off like a shot! It’s rare that we get to run the iceboats with the kite skiers, they generally want a rougher surface than we’re looking for, but the warm temps and serious breeze have softened up the ice enough for him to get an edge. John’s off next, and I follow shortly. Ah, it’s good to back in the saddle!

Clouds move in, and with them come snow squalls. The wind becomes much more variable, dropping from our initial runs, and picking up as the squalls pass thru the valley. Phil and I return for larger rigs, John, having made the right choice of sail size initially, continues to cut it up. The surface is warming fast, producing significant puddles, and now thin sheets of ice are being torn off by the runners. All of which makes for a damp ride. Around noon we converge on the launch, for dry clothes, a bite to eat, and maybe a beer.

It’s starting to fill in now, and after a few more runs I have to rig down to the 4.5 meter sail. Perfect! She’s fully powered up now, the runners are biting well, and both John and I are approaching 50 mph on the downwind sprints. Which uses up this small lake quickly! John parks at the east end and breaks out the video camera. I race around him, trying to maximize my speed as I pass by him. It’s blowing a steady 20+ now, and it’s a challenge to control the boat. Apply too much power, or turn too sharply, and my rear runners break free, and she goes into a violent spin. One mistake, and I do a 720 degree spin, which I exit backwards, still travelling 20 mph!

I relieve John on camera duty, and he gets to show off, making the same loop, looking much smoother than me. This is the best pressure of the day, and it’s the kind of sailing we dream about, sometimes never seeing in a season. And here we are in November, already chocking up an epic day.
Phil’s burned up his available reserve of energy, and we’re winding down as well. As the sun rushes the horizon, we head in and pack up the boats in the waning sunshine, grinning stupidly again!
What a sport! Patience rewarded!

Dave

 

November 25th, 2014

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