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Big Pimpin’
That’s right, four very fortunate boys and girls will receive special travel grants from the 2018 O’pen BIC North Americans, Aug 9-11, to the 2019 O’pen BIC World Championships in New Zealand, hosted by Manly Sailing Club and the Sir Russell Coutts Sailing Foundation, 26 Dec 2018 to 4 Jan 2019.

Two boys will be randomly selected from the top ten age-eligible boys overall, and two girls will be randomly selected from the top six age-eligible girls overall to receive these grants. To be eligible, you must be from North America and be U17 Class eligible for the New Zealand 2019 Worlds (i.e. you must be born 2003 or later).

The O’pen BIC North Americans are being hosted by the prestigious Buffalo Canoe Club in Ridgeway, Ontario. For more info click here.

 

May 18th, 2018

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Pimp, Inc. We see lots of new hot design singlehanders making a push these days, but few have been seeing the consistent events and participation of the RS Aero. Having just wrapped up the inaugural RS Aero Midwinter Series with over 50 sailors participating over 5 events, the class is getting ready for their North American Championships in Galveston, Texas this Friday through Sunday.

From there the class has a busy summer schedule supported by a 20’ box trailer rolling road show of demo boats in the North as well as an active circuit in the PNW and fleets starting to gain traction all over.

For a full schedule, to charter your own RS Aero, or bring the RS Aero road show to you, click right here! And jump in the discussion here.

Title inspiration thanks to the forever brilliant Harry Nilsson.

 

May 17th, 2018

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The Environment

It is worth noting that the idiot many of you voted for President doesn’t know, nor give one flying fuck about any of this, or anything to do with saving the environment at all. Congrats, dummies.

Picking up a plastic bag from the beach makes a bigger difference than you might imagine.

1. What are microplastics?

Microplastics come in all sizes, shapes and colors. Some particles are so small that they’re invisible without a microscope, while others are perceptible as grains or fibers of different sizes. Microplastics are defined as plastic pieces that are between one micrometer (one millionth of a meter) and five millimeters in size. Nanoplastics are particles that are smaller than one micrometer.

All plastics are manufactured industrially. There is no such thing as “natural” plastic. Plastic consists mainly of carbon and hydrogen, which are bound together in long chains called polymers. The length of the chains, how they’re woven together and what other substances are included (e.g. chlorine) determine the properties of different plastic types.

Plastics also contain chemical additives that give the plastic certain properties. Phthalates are chemicals that make hard plastic soft and pliable in products like garden hoses and vinyl floor coverings, for example.

2. Where do microplastics come from?

Scientists distinguish between primary and secondary microplastics. Primary microplastics are small plastic particles that are intentionally manufactured in this size for use in cosmetic products or as abrasives. Secondary microplastics result when larger plastic products – such as plastic bags, bottles or fishing nets – break down into smaller plastic pieces.

Microplastics originate from a variety of sources. Car tire treads, made of a mixture of rubber and plastic, are a major land source. Studies have shown that an average car tire loses about 1.5 kilograms (3.3 pounds) over its lifetime from normal wear and tear, dispersing millions of microplastic particles into the environment.

Paint from buildings, roads and ships, and fibers from synthetic fabrics are additional sources of microplastics. Sportswear and fleece clothing release large amounts of fiber when washed and end up being flushed out with the wastewater. In modern water treatment plants, a lot of this material is filtered out and discharged into the collected sludge, but some still gets through. When the sludge from wastewater treatment plants is used as agricultural fertilizer, farmland becomes the recipient of large quantities of plastic fibers.

About 75 percent of all plastics that wind up in the ocean originate on land and are transported via rivers. Insufficient garbage handling makes rivers in Asia and Africa particularly vulnerable. Trash from ocean vessels – either lost or tossed from ships – accounts for the rest of the plastic debris in the ocean. Rubbish, and especially plastic, is piling up in five huge ocean gyres. The effects of the sun, wind and waves, coupled with abrasion from sand and stone, break down the plastics into smaller fragments and create huge amounts of microplastics and nanoplastics.

Read it all.

 

May 17th, 2018

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Who knew Macs would become collector boats?

“Unique opportunity to own one of the last MacGregor trailerable sailboats off the line before MacGregor closed in Costa Mesa, CA in 2012.

This boat is like new! We purchased it new. Very few of these boats are available!”

Buy it Now!

 

May 17th, 2018

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It was all looking good for the J-70  Woodstock, sail number 815  going into their NA’s, but when they went to launch the bow was not tied to the trailer. As the boat went down the ramp the stern started to go down, bow up, driver hit the brakes, boat flew off the trailer. Series over, right? Wrong. They worked like hell to get it ready, and indeed they are…6th after two days. Results.

 

May 17th, 2018

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We know this is a couple weeks old, but wasn’t this team supposed to be the big “environmental” AC Team? But why stick to principles when you can sell out for $217 million to the UK’s biggest drilling and fracking billionaire?? Unless there is something we’re missing, what total horseshit. Change the name to Team Petrochemical, then we’ll appreciate the full whoring out that has been done.

Sir Ben Ainslie’s British challenge for the America’s Cup has received a huge boost with a new $217m sponsorship. The staggering amount of money comes from Ineos, Britain’s biggest privately owned company which has grown into one of the world’s top 10 petrochemicals businesses by leasing or buying unwanted assets from firms such as BP and ICI.

It was founded by billionaire pro-Brexit businessman Jim Ratcliffe and, according to The Guardian, is one of the main UK exponents of fracking, a controversial process of drilling down into the earth before a high-pressure water mixture is directed at the rock to release the gas inside. Read on thanks to the Stuff.

 

May 17th, 2018

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Winter has finally ended here in the Midwest, just drove the boat to Detroit in hopes of some early epic racing on Lake St Clair before we head South. Another summer is about to go down for the cast of characters on Knee Deep…….we’ll see what happens. ’tis the season to race boats! Anarchist Brett.

 

May 17th, 2018

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Big Pimpin’

Everything about the new SuperFoiler racing circuit in Australia is about adrenaline-fuelled speed – and that applies as much to the design and technical development of the equipment as to pace around the course. For the Doyle Sails team tasked with producing the horsepower for these high-octane foiling trimarans the challenge was irresistible, despite the tight timeframes for designing, developing and delivering fast one-design sails for the fleet.

The SuperFoiler circuit is the brainchild of Australian father and son duo, Bill and Jack Macartney, and aims to take over the mantle of the highly successful 18ft skiff grand prix circus, which Bill Macartney pioneered. They commissioned designers Morrelli & Melvin to come up with a supercharged small foiler, sailed by three people all on trapeze, with a brief to perform in 5-25kt. The result is a hot rod, demanding to sail but capable of speeds up to 40kt. ‘The closest thing to these boats are the America’s Cup foiling multihulls,’ says Pete Melvin. Measuring 7.9m long by 5.1m wide, with a 12.5m mast and 33m2 sail area, they are highly technical with a mass of control systems to master.

‘The power-to-weight ratio is very high, with a 5m beam and weighing only 250kg,’ says Melvin. ‘Most other boats of comparable size are two to three times heavier.’

To bring the concept to reality Doyle joined forces with Innovation Composites, who built the platforms, and Hall Spars, who supplied the rigs and foils. Doyle CEO Mike Sanderson embraced the concept, describing it as ‘the next level of excitement above the 18-footers and a whole new world’. Read on.

 

May 17th, 2018

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Well hell, this might be a tough one. Or is it?

 

May 17th, 2018

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J/24 “151” Swept under the aerial Lift Bridge in Duluth Mn after a big wind shift and accompanying seiche. Wind was 5-8 SW and instantly shifted to 35+ NE. These guys had the chute up going out into the lake and scraped it down in time to get pushed back into the bridge. Nobody was injured, except a mast-size dent in the rum budget.

 

May 16th, 2018

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