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vor in port 1

Mr. Clean will surely give us the blow by blow report of the VOR Pro Am race from today as soon as he posts bail, but in the meantime, here’s s great shot of the start from Trevor Wilkins, with more here. Race was won by Team SCA.

 

November 16th, 2014

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Will Ian Walker get back on form and run away with the Cape Town In-Port Race? When Bouwe told the press that he didn’t take the in-port seriously, was he serious? Will the girls start showing their talent? What happens when you sail a VO65 with just 7 crew? And most importantly, will Knut Frostad throw Mr. Clean in the water during their on-water commentary together?

Find all this out and more with a couple of hours of beautiful racing in the shadow of Table Mountain.  And don’t forget about the Leg 2 Start this coming Wednesday, when you can listen to Clean and the team once again as the fleet heads off for some Soouthern Ocean fun. That’s 19 November at 1750 local/1550 GMT/1050 EST/0750 PST.

UPDATE: Thanks for your patience. We’re not happy with this delay at all and we can say confidently it’ll be a lot faster next time. I’ll have my thoughts on the race and some more inside news and gossip over the next few days as the Leg 2 Start approaches. Thread or Facebook for it.

November 15th, 2014

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s 27 3

Seascapes 27 flocked south to join Croatian Offshore classics The Jabuka race. Racing in their own class for the second year gathered 7 crews from around the Europe. Probably the craziest is the Norwegian crew of Tor Hove and Lars Peter Karlsen which drove 2500 km from Oslo to Zadar on Wednsday, will do the race today and drive back with their boat on Saturday! This pic is from the nightime start!

Online updates of the race progress and preparation are here.

 

November 14th, 2014

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Clean Report

It was nearly ten years ago when I did my first on-assignment interview for Sailing Anarchy; an interview with then-skipper of Movistar, Bouwe Bekking.  Three weeks later, Movistar sank, but Bouwe is brave and I’m going aboard Brunel with him today for the practice race, but not before posting this interview with the Dutch ocean racer.  Check out this link for ten minutes with another bald icon, Ian Walker, and be sure to hit the Leg 2  thread with any questions you have for me.

And be sure to watch the In-Port Race tomorrow starting at 1350 local time/1150 GMT/0650 EST.

 

November 14th, 2014

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Screen Shot 2014-11-14 at 10.33.22 AMWhen Sir Robin Knox-Johnson crosses the Route Du Rhum finish line in Gaudeloupe in a little less than a week, he’ll get some spectacular news; the lawsuit filed by English bottom-feeder lawyer Ruth Harvey against his Clipper Race was tossed out by a Havant judge earlier this week.  Harvey claimed she suffered sexual harassment and discrimination aboard Jamaica Get All Right (irie?), and sought protection as an employee of the Clipper despite having paid a shit ton of money to sail the race.  The judge disagreed.

Harvey dropped out after two legs and sued earlier in the year, and now that she’s been dispatched, we encourage anyone seeing her on a boat to heckle her mercilessly.  Head over to the thread for pics and more information.

 

November 14th, 2014

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Our apologies for missing Veterans’ Day by a few, but big props to Ben Poucher and the USMMA Sailing Foundation for continuing to do great things with sailboats for our American servicemen.  Pooch checks in below.

The Warrior Sailing program was created in 2013 through a partnership between US Sailing and The USMMA Sailing Foundation.  Additional support has come from the adaptive sailing community and local sailing clubs like St. Pete Sailing Center, Chicago Yacht Club, and Texas Corinthian Yacht Club (to name a few).  All of these groups working together have successfully provided opportunities to veterans to learn the sport of sailing.  Warrior Sailing has organized multiple 3-day intense camps, where veterans learn from professional coaches the basics of sailing and racing.  From these camps individuals that want to pursue the sport have come forward and asked us to keep coaching them and the natural progression was to develop a ‘core team’.  With additional support from the Foundation and continuing hard work from the ‘core team’, we attended the National Disabled Championships in Galveston in late October.  Our two military rookie teams showed tremendous amounts of dedication to training and learning the sport throughout the summer and fall seasons.  With the help of legendary coach and program co-director Lee Icyda, this group won Nationals with one entry, our second entry taking 5th.  Pretty amazing for only having 7 months of sailing experience! It was a humbling experience for the coaches and all of the support staff.

We’re happy to announce that we have been granted an adaptive sports grant from the Veterans Administration for 2015 – the first such grant awarded to the famous USMMA Sailing foundation run by everyone’s favorite smiling German, Ralfie Steitz. This grant sets a solid base of monetary support for 2015, but we are still in need of additional support!

Our team of directors, coaches, advisors, and strategic partners look forward to the furthering development of The Warrior Sailing Program 3-day open camps for 2015.  We are also excited about the upcoming traveling ‘core team’ of wounded vets coming to a sailing venue near you!  If you like this kind of thing, please head over to our Facebook Page and like us, and stay tuned for schedules and planning for the upcoming season!

If you are interested in helping support these deserving individuals, or you are a veteran that wants to get involved, please go to our website and send me an inquiry.  If you are feeling particularly generous and want to donate directly to our cause, please go to this link and donate a gift to the warrior sailing program though the USMMA sailing foundation website. www.usmmasailingfoundation.org

-Pooch/Poocher/Pouche’/Ben

 

November 13th, 2014

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Screen Shot 2014-11-13 at 8.49.05 AMLooking to plan the next major championship for your class?   Look no further America’s new ‘Green Coast’, and we’re not talking about conservation.  Nope – we’re talking about the new American West – a place where, thanks to the continuing voter revolution,  smoking weed is now legal from the Mexican to Canadian border – and beyond.  Add to that some of the best sailing spots in the World, and your class should never need to go to some windless, smokeless bay again.

This applies even to the cream of the crop, too, thanks to WADA’s ten-fold increase in the amount of allowed THC in your blood. It’s now legal to smoke even for Olympian and America’s Cup racers (as long as you don’t toke ten minutes before your test).

And it ain’t just the California-to-Alaska pipeline – roughly half of US states now allow ‘kind buds’ to either treat what ails you, or just your need for the munchies, with another 10 dominoes likely to fall over the next few years.  Considering the massively positive effect that legal weed has had on Colorado’s $3 billion/year ski industry, those who can capitalize on this new development will be way ahead of the curve, and we think sailors should be right on top of it.

Just imagine it:  Green medibles and vapor pens alongside Mount Gay and Coke, new sponsors, great T-shirt design ideas, and something to finally make that regatta food palatable.  We’re in!  Is your class?

 

November 12th, 2014

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uh oh

It doesn’t look good, does it? Trevor Wilkins shows you more.

 

November 12th, 2014

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china match 3The 10th China Club Challenge Match finals, China’s oldest annual sailing regatta, and the only fully umpired match race event in China took place over the three days of 7-9th November on the waters off Xiamen, China.

The top 8 teams from the fleet racing qualifier held a few weeks earlier were invited back and seeded according to their positions in the fleet racing.

To put the previous month’s event in perspective, there were 28 teams in provided boats (a local version of the Flying Tiger 7.5) and some of those teams had come through a regional qualifier to be in the qualifier with a 10 race series determining the results. These races were run under ISAF RRS Addendum Q enabling on the water decisions with reduced risk ‘Room Time’ and DSQs.

The racing in both parts of the event, qualifiers and finals, was under the watchful eyes of two Nw Zealand International Umpires, John Rountree and Wayne Boberg assisted by Alistair Skinner & Belle Xing, a local Optimist coach.

Days one and three of the finals were held in the confines of the Wu Wuan Bay, and almost land-locked area of water with spectator areas all round and a small but noticeable swirl of a current  with the start line a little over 100m off the steeply shelving beach giving spectators a good view of the racing. So close in fact that one of the competitors wandered a little too far from the pre-start area and ended needing a tow off the putty – luckily he was not in a sequence at the time.

Day one saw 16 matches across 8 flights as the quarter finals halved the competitor numbers ready for day two. Efficient race management, a couple of score-lines “to love” and a breeze that largely stayed steady in strength and direction meant all were off the water nice and early, ready for the semis to follow on day two when the remaining teams were likely to take the tempo up a notch.

While flags were frequently up in the air on day one, Yankees from the boats and primarily greens from the umpires, the racing was often tight but always in good spirits with competitors taking their ‘medicine’ without argument.

This set the tone for the whole event and in the evening the umpires held a teach-in and debrief, which one or two non-attendees were to rue not attending during the following day’s racing. The focus of the teach-in being the two seemingly simple – but fundamental – definitions of ‘Room” and ‘Keep Clear’ and many of the following days green flags were to be a result of these two basic concepts.

china match 2The weather gods were not in such a smiley mood on day two and after being able to run a couple of flights within the bay the pressure gradually diminished forcing a switch out into the main channel where initially there was more breeze but, being the time of the month, a strong tide (2-3 days after springs) meant the race management team were ultimately defeated in their attempts to complete the program with one match ending further below the bottom mark than the top mark was above it.

This potentially  led to pressure on the organisers on the last day and on arriving at the dock to limp flags and glassy water it looked like, for the first time, the Club Cup as it is sometimes known might have trouble completing its scheduled races.

Patience favours the brave however and as the day progressed so did the wind AND it steadied up too requiring few delays between racing for course resetting. The first to three finals went to the full five races with Beijing China Yachting sponsored by the leading Chinese sailing magazine winning the right to challenge the holders and defenders, Xiamen Blue Sea, a team made up largely of Xiamen University students.

Sadly for the defenders, they had no answer to the Beijing team’s now match prepared sharpness and their ‘wild aggression’, as one spectator described it, seemed to get them into more trouble than it got them out of. The ‘Y’ flag was much in evidence, mostly with a green response from Chief Umpire Rountree and after the umpires prematurely stating ‘we haven’t seen a single black flag in the whole event’, a delay in taking a second penalty by the Xiamen students resulted in two blues and a black fluttering above the umpire boat for the only time in the regatta.

china match 1That said, all umpire decisions were met with good spirit (a few top match racers might take a lesson from that) and the 3-0 victory by the challengers was a convincing victory for the Beijing team which completed a four year journey for their skipper, Shen Sheng who first competed in the China Club Challenge Match in 2010.

The prizegiving was held on the main stage of the Xiamen Boat Show, and then on to the after regatta party and Xiamen IronRock Sailing Club should be congratulated for growing this event over the years from a 2 club head to head in old J-24s to what is recognized as one of the ‘must do’ events for keen racing sailors in China.

These events don’t happen overnight and the 2015 event is already in the calendar, the post mortem of what was good and what could be better is in progress and with this attitude, this regatta can only continue to grow in its size and stature.

One foreigner asked “Are there enough sailors in China for an event like this? – You better believe it!

Shanghai Sailor

 

November 11th, 2014

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In this battle of the latecomers from an angle we may be the first to have, the two final entries in the VOR fight it out mid-Atlantic, with Chris Nicholson luffing the Spanish a couple of weeks into Leg 1.  Did MAPFRE foul Vestas?  You make the call.

Meanwhile, MAPFRE’s DFL has already produced some major casualties, including the world’s most successful solo ocean RTW’er.  You heard that right, Michel Desjoyeaux gets the flick from MAPFRE along with French navigator Nico Lunven, and Spanish sailing journo Pedro Sardinia says there was plenty of drama between the French star and Spanish skipper, and q quite unbearable atmosphere on boad according to Sardina.  Thanks to Geronimoll for the translation of the original Spanish piece here.

You should already be on the Leg 2 thread here if you’re looking for the latest news.  Want to know something special about any of the teams or this edition of the VOR?  Post up and Mr. Clean will get the answer for you on the ground in Cape Town – he arrives on Wednesday.

 

November 11th, 2014

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Mark Chisnell is having a week off, so throughout this week at the B&G Blog, we will be featuring feedback from the Navigators themselves which relates to the B&G Navigators’ Prize for the Volvo Ocean Race.Here’s a short précis of today’s content:

The B&G Navigators’ Prize for the Volvo Ocean Race 2014-15 will be awarded to the Navigator who has made the most effective use of meteorological, oceanographic and geographical information to gain distance on the majority of the fleet, as voted for by the seven competing Navigators themselves. Here’s a revealing (and somewhat poignant) little taster of opinion so far from Nicolas Lunven and Wouter Verbraak.

Read more here.

 

November 11th, 2014

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what is it 11 111

Something old, something new? Tell us.

 

November 11th, 2014

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Big Pimpin’

Mauri Pro Sailing has some pretty frigging good deals on some of the very best wet weather gear – Henri Lloyd.

They are bundling gear packages to fit any type of sailing, from Elite Race to Elite Offshore and everything in between. Check it out!

 

November 11th, 2014

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Sam Greenfield gives you something really awesome…

Ronaldo and Bradley are students at the Lawhill Maritime Centre in Cape Town, South Africa. Today their class visited Nick Bice at the boatyard and set a goal for the future: to be the first South African team in the Volvo Ocean Race.

 

November 10th, 2014

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Just over a week in and the carnage level has died down a little, with the exception of Conrad Humphreys in the class 40 ‘Cat Phones’ losing his rig and Robin Knox Johnston who’s all out of cigarettes and dangerously low on whisky. The only storm left on the course has been surrounding Loick at the finish as he cemented his status on the legends roster with a popular race record and overall victory. Despite finding one of Sodebo’s tow missing bows washed up on a French beach Thomas Coville has denied rumours he plans restart the race shortly.

IMOCA ROUTING

imoca routingThe strategy in the IMOCA 60 fleet is all but over. Francois is 30nm directly ahead of Jeremie and there is little but breakages which is going to change the result in this one. Both boats are probably about 100nm off the port layline into ‘GuadeLOICK’ and therefore a short hitch might be needed to make it around the North of the island. The ensemble GRIB below of 1.0deg at 1200UT 10th November is suggesting this gybe is absolutely better to do sooner rather than later, but expect fleet tactics to dictate this move rather than following the perfect weather. When Jeremie goes, Francois will follow.

CLASS 40 ROUTING

40 routeIn the Class 40 fleet the race is absolutely still on and it is hotting up at the front with 4 boats going for the podium places. In the grudge match of this race Mirranda Merron has a healthy lead over her long time partner Halvard Mabire (who’s got the newer flashier boat of the two). Don’t be fooled by the westerly favouring tracker here, Alex Pella is in the lead over the biggest rockstar in the 40 club Kito de Pavant.

Alex is in a really strong position here compared to the rest of the fleet. He will be looking to cover moves from Kito in the north, who will be his biggest rival for victory as it stands at the moment. It is interesting comparing the two routings of both Kito and Alex.

Strategy wise, there are 4 big gybe calls to make between now and the finish. From the IsoRoute below (the shaded area) you can see there is about a 200nm corridor in which to play this game where you would only lose 3 hours (the setting we choose for the IsoRoute) giving plenty of options to play for the lead skippers. Picking up the small, but predictable, shifts that occur between day and night due to atmospheric tide and playing with squalls around the taller clouds are the key trade wind skills needed from now

One thing that is hard to defend however is pure boatspeed, and here we could see which boat performs well in VMG running conditions if they choose to stick together. Kito will know the game on play here, and it will be fascinating how he chooses to attack Alex over the coming week. Through keeping it close if he believes he is faster? Or using the gaps in between the ‘sched’ updates to try and create leverage on his opponent? Any lead of less than ten miles or so won’t be safe until the very end as the wind shadow round the back of Guadeloupe can be a fickle beast indeed. – Nick Cherry.

 

November 10th, 2014

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fuck me

The Ed is looking for a new girlfriend. She looks like she’ll do!

 

November 10th, 2014

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Bouwe Bekking takes a look back at leg one of the Volvo Ocean Race. Enjoy!

Sitting on the veranda of a nice winery near Stellenbosch , a bottle of water, some small healthy snacks and my lovely wife besides me. The sort of drink and food thanks to our splendid health advisors. It sounds maybe strange but not even missing the alcohol after nearly 9 months standing dry. You have to do something to stay in shape and leaving the booze for what it is has helped me a lot. Actually right now preparing for our crewmeeting on wednesday, when all the boys are due to back for business. During that meeting we will go over all the aspects of the first leg, underneath the leg review. Good thing is that I can stripe that of the agenda for our meeting .

We didn’t do a lot of homework in Alicante, no outside weather expert on site, saving money and more important, as Capey (our navigator) said, this one I have got the grip on and know what to expect.
First impression: the easiest leg I have ever done into Capetown: reason not very windy. One front passage leaving Gibraltar gave us briefly 40 knots , although on the nose and from then a cake ride , with the most breeze in the southern ocean was only 27 knots.

The start was good ,leading the way and maybe most important happy faces for sponsors and the hunderds of cloggies who where there to say farwell. It amazes me always so quickly you get back in the routine. One thing I learned from previous races is not to go crazy with sail changes in a thundery conditions like we had: it burns the guys out , but more important is that they don’t get pissed of , as very often if the reactions are impulsive you end up quickly with the wrong sail, meaning doing another sail change. We had our game plan ready and more less stuck to it until we arrived in Gibraltar. Our aim was always to be within 4-5 miles of whoever was leading and don’t split. That girls made a jump on us didn’t worry us for a moment. They made the right move avoiding the big east going current in the Straight of Gibraltar, but we stuck with the fleet, which meant we twice had to cross the east going river, with 4 knots of current. If one other boat would have gone towards gibraltar, we would have tacked as well, but we didn’t want to lead in.

Once well in the Straight we were in a solid 2nd place, but parked under rain cloud. Half an hour later, 8 miles behind number two, ouch, that hurted it bit, but you have to stay calm in such a situation. That evening we had the front passage and that went extremely well. We did the right things there, always well in time to size down in sail combinations and tacked at the right time when the front hit us , you sail quickly away form the mark, of you have a 70 degree windshift. From being 20 miles behind the girls, we were right up front with the others.

From there on it was hugging the African coast, as the Azores high was not established in its usual place, due to some big low pressure systems going across to Europe. For a couple of days it was playing the shifts and the south going current and always keeping an eye on the bearing compare the other boats. The reports Volvo organization is sending 4 times a day don’t mean any thing: we are actually only use the position of the other boats and having our own leaderboard / scoring system. The Volvo score might have a boat in the lead, meaning shortest distance away from Capetown, but in reality this boat can be last , if you take the routing into the account. One gybe can cost tremendously. So we always look at crosswinds, bearing and distance, that really says if we do well or not. As well of course we know if we had any hick-ups during a so-called sched. We did three back downs sailing close to the african coast , to get shit of our keel, not nice as these cost heaps, one did cost us nearly 8 miles!

Once leaving the coast of Mauritania we had a plan in place how we wanted to attack the doldrums. To option , go west, or go SW through the Cape Verdes islands. I don’t know how many routes Capey ran into our imaginary waypoint at the doldrums, but the western Route was never more than 20 minutes behind. A no brainer for us , that route through the Cape Verdes was too risky.

We were in close company of Abu and in in good shape, sometimes they lost, sometimes we lost due to clouds, amazing how much impact this can have. One example: once we were in the SE trades, only 2.5 miles to leeward, we ended up on the wrong side of a cloud. Within 45 minutes, Abu was 8 miles to weather and gained 90 degrees of bearing and this loss got more expensive as from there they always sailed first into the lifting pressure.

The south atlantic we played again conservatively , knowing that south was king, we didn’t do any strange things and stayed to our game plan. Vestas sailed heaps more miles, but risky in our opinion. Ok , they did cross us eventually, but only with 3 miles. If the shift would have come any earleir , they could have missed out by a lot. Abu played middle ground and lost out to us both. This was the point where we started riding the first weak front, 20-23 knots of breeze. We were going well, slowly gaining on both and we knew at one stage we had to make our 90 degree turn in to capetown.. We always wanted to be the most southern boat, as for whatever reason south has very often 1-2 knots more pressure, Abu gybed one hour before us and dongfeng 2 hours before. We lost respectively 22 and 44 miles , not too worried at that stage, but as we all know the pressure never came and we lost out. Game over for the leg. But i have to say we were happy with our performance that last part, not losing out as much as we expected against the leaders and sailing away from the windmill boat. By the way, same team will be onboard TeamBrunel for leg 2.

cheers,

bouwe

 

November 10th, 2014

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the winner

RdR Breaking

Loick Peyron just did the almost impossible, he set the new Route du Rhum elapsed time record! 07 Days 15 hours 8 minutes et 32 seconds, 22.93 knots average speed and he  beat  Lionel Lemonchois record by 2h 10mn 34s! See more here, and we’ll have the full story shortly. Photo thanks to Mark Lloyd.

 

November 9th, 2014

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An interesting look at part of the VOR we tend not to think much about…

During the first leg, the nine crew members of Team Brunel all lost a number of kilos of muscle mass and fat. Team Brunel has a specialised medical staff in order to ensure that they are fit for the start of the second leg to Abu Dhabi on 19 November. Manual therapist Mark Haak plays an important role, and has previously supported the Ajax footballers and various Olympic athletes in their recuperation.

 “At the finish, the men are still pumped up with adrenaline and stress hormones,” Mark explains. “They still feel reasonably good at that point. It’s not until the second day that the tiredness hits them and they lose the muscle coordination in their legs. The switch from top gear to first gear also costs energy. The most important change is their sleeping patterns however. Instead of snatching four hours’ sleep, they can now spend a full night in bed during a stopover.” Read on.

 

November 9th, 2014

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Leg 1 of the Volvo is over, the Rhum fleet screams towards the Caribbean, some Midwest college action, remembering the memories, and much more in this week’s edition of Video Anarchy.

The King of the Atlantic

it was a different Banque Populaire Maxi that Loick Peyron took to the ultimate record smash, but today’s accomplishment is almost as good; the affable Francais and SA fan is just a few hours from breaking the absolute Route Du Rhum record, more than a hundred miles ahead of the bigger, faster boat he once skippered!  Peyron needs to average around 15 knots to break the Lemonchois record (of 7d aboard a boat he was only recruited to sail a couple of months ago, and with Michel Desjoyeaux and Franck Cammas flailing around in their own pursuits lately, Peyron cements his legendary place as today’s king of the Atlantic.  The Route Du Rhum thread just keeps getting better and better, especially now that Anarchist “Laurent” is back putting English translations on the best videos from the course like today’s note from Loick; thanks Laurent! The latest page of the thread is here, or read from the beginning here.

Heart of Darkness

The last time we got excited about a sailing movie was when Peter Weir brought Patrick O’Brian’s incredible Master and Commander to the big screen with the help of at least one Anarchist rigger.  The movie was badass to sailors and mostly well-received by critics, though it never got close to making up the USD$150 million it cost to make – part of the reason we haven’t seen another big budget nautical movie in the intervening decade.

But now there’s a new one, and it’s based on the scariest fish story of all time.  Heart of the Sea is directed by one of the best of the generation, adapting a spectacular book written by a guy who once won a major Sunfish championship.  You can learn more in the thread, but for now, just click “HD” and turn the sound up.  This one is worth it.

Final Fourth

It’s full of clips that any real Volvo fan saw days or weeks ago, isn’t really targeted at knowledgable sailors, and occasionally forgets that it’s telling stories about a race rather than a cruise, but the fourth installment of Volvo’s Life at the Extreme TV series continues to improve on earlier episodes, even if only in fits and starts.  If anything, it’s a great show to share with non-sailing squares – students at school or your friends, families, or whomever has shown an inability to really comprehend what you do on Saturdays and Wednesday nights, or why you always have bruises after some of those long weekends.  For our part we don’t expect to embed these for you after this one – there’s just better stuff coming from the teams and VOR and we prefer to highlight that.

We’re not particularly bullish on cable TV and we don’t expect to get bowled over by the race’s American TV ratings now that NBCSN is running the series, but we’re not at all sure it matters.  With over a million Facebook fans and a monster news, social media and video footprint right now, it’s clear the investments they’ve made in staff, one-design boats and communications are paying.

The race’s biggest problem is the typical Sailing Anarchy reader, because they need you.  It’s your support that keeps interest up between races and it’s yachtie brand-loyalty that sustains interest in this race over the decades.   But you know too much, you expect too much, and it’s impossible to keep you happy, which is why we tell everyone that the Ocean Racing Anarchy forum threads are really the best tool to follow the race.  Let the Anarchists curate the information coming out of the boats and race HQ for you, and follow along there yourself.  Relive the leg 1 thread here, and be ready for Leg 2 by subscribing to the thread.  Check the short Leg 1 review reel here.  Those of you coming over to Cape Town for the festivities, the schedule is here.

The People’s Skipper

Whitbread skipper, sailmaker, and everyone’s favorite Cork character Joe English died last week, and we salute the Irishman with this short film following Joe and wife April’s journey with the early-onset Alzheimer’s that eventually took his life.  If the film (or Joe’s memory) touched your life, consider donating to The Alzheimer Society of Ireland.  Thread here.

Big Fish/Little Pond

Our friend Sarah Sloan over at the Michigan Sailing Team hits us with a little news from the Big Ten Team Race last week in Ann Arbor; scores and details here, and thanks to U of M sailor Zachary Frankel for the movie.

Six months after the Worst Winter Ever and the resulting perpetually froze lake caused the University of Michigan Sailing Team to postpone and reschedule the Big 10 Team Race regatta, six teams from the MCSA came to Ann Arbor to compete for the top prize (in this case, a giant jar of Halloween candy and their name on an impeccably polished trophy).

In an uncharacteristic display of charity, Michigan Weather decided to provide us with exceptional fall weather and wind Saturday and Sunday. The University of Michigan, the University of Wisconsin, Northwestern University, Marquette University, the University of Notre Dame, and the Ohio State University sailed all day under blue skies and with a blowing breeze. Michigan ended the day undefeated in first, and everyone returned back to campus for a night of relaxation and warm showers.

Even though there was a decrease in temperature and wind speed on Sunday, the level of competition was still incredibly high, with the day ending in a sail-off between the University of Michigan and the University of Wisconsin. Michigan won the final race, but subsequently lost off the water when a protest brought to the judges went in the favor of Wisconsin, who clenched the top spot for the weekend.

It seemed, however, that everyone drove away Sunday afternoon feeling victorious. UofM isn’t going to name names, but we overheard members of another team claiming they haven’t had as much fun at a regatta as they did at Big Ten since they were freshman. It’s hard to stay upset about your performance on the water when you put your accomplishments in perspective; how many college students can say they got to spend the weekend on the water with the coolest kids across the Midwest?

 

November 9th, 2014

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FSS_SA

Gunboat 60 sailing in Annapolis, MD.

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