ner 2

hh banner green

schwab tall banner ad

helly 10 9 side banner

torqeedo small ad

http://www.mauriprosailing.com/

BBY_SA

http://www.dryuv.com

karver ad 1 14

weta banner 2 9

sound ad 4 23

velocitek banner 10 14

seascape banner

http://www.shaw650.com/

http://www.quantumsails.com/

http://www.lymanmorse.com

farr 280 banner 9 4

c tech 9 22

fireball banner ad

pyi banner ad

c c 8 7 ad

http://www.crowleys.com/

fastsailing_sailing_anarchy

fisheries watch ad 9 18

http://www.camet.com/

hh banner purple

swing keel ad.jpg_sml

anchor new ad

ullman banner 7 24

melges banner 10 14

ropeye banner 3 25

sapphire 27

fisheries banner 9 4

Gunboat 60 sailing in Annapolis, MD.

salty tag 2

FSS_SA

race q banner ad

uk ad 4 3

ewol banner ad

rbs banner ad

VX-One-550x150-Bnr_V3

b&g banner 10 7

mcconaghy banner 8 11

southern spar 10 21 banner ad

nke 10 2 banner

boyd banner ad

tan banner 10 14

GUNBOAT 55 Multihull Anarchy Banner

mauri 3 1 SA-Top-Rotate

torqeedo top banner

Article Separator

After the Olympics there was a lot of discussion about the reasons behind the  poor showing of US sailing. I contributed to that discussion, and continue to think about how the  US can improve its Olympic results.

But first, despite the fact that we live in France, I follow pretty closely college football and the NFL  via satellite (Go Packers). So what does this have to do with Olympic sailing?

I, like many others, have been pretty amazed at the class of college quarterbacks who have
graduated into the NFL over the past few years. Andrew Luck, RG-III, Cam Newton, Sam Bradford, Russell  Wilson, Brandon Weedon, Colt McCoy, Ryan Tannehill, and others. They came straight out of  college and into the starting QB position in the pros. Awesome. What was once unheard of now  seems almost the norm.

But, still more interesting is the fact that somewhere around 8 starting QBs, and a total of 17 NFL  QBs, played their high school football in Texas…. So, again, what does this have to do with Olympic class sailing? Two points:

First: Playing QB is a technical position that takes talent and a long time to learn. Yet these
athletes walk right out of university at 22 or 23 years old, and into the most competitive league in  their sport. Compare this to college sailors….

Whereas high school and college football prepares players to continue in the sport at a top level,
college sailors sail simple little boats in a regatta format that isn’t applicable anywhere else. It’s
accepted that a college sailor, who wants to go into Olympic class sailing, will have a 2 or 3 year  intense training program, after graduation, just to become reasonably competitive in an
international fleet. How many good college sailing athletes have the time or resources for that?

Second: Texas high school football coaches are doing something right. And, while I’m not an
expert, I learned a bit from a short piece on ESPN that gave some background. And, I’d ask, is
there something here that might apply to sailing?

Football in Texas is huge (who knew?). Kids start in junior high, some earlier (think Optis). By
High School the QB is running complicated offensive formations, with line of scrimmage option
calls, etc. (think I-420, 29ers, 505s). In addition, coaching and games aren’t just linked to
school. There are 7 on 7 teams that train and play outside the school year in sponsored leagues.  So, it’s a year-round program.

Then these young athletes are off to university where many play on nationally ranked teams
running pro style offenses (think 49ers, 470s, Finns). The college QB, who has come up through
this program, has learned his trade and is ready to shoot for the Super Bowl (think Olympic Gold).

What a difference from sailing.

College sailing got pretty beat up in the previous discussion after the London Olympic results.
I’m not here to pile on. It is what it is, and isn’t likely to change much. I did it, and I liked it.
But, it doesn’t have much to do with racing at an international level.

My interest here is thinking about what the US can do to provide the same high level training for
young sailors that their classmates who play football get. That young sailors in other countries
get. But, maybe we don’t need to look to the rest of the world for ideas. Rather we might learn
something from the organization of high school football in Texas.

Start simple. Start local. Isn’t there a region in the US where a “Texas model” would work for
youth sailing? The Boston area, around Annapolis, SF Bay area, Puget Sound, the Inland Lakes
region, (although it would have to include ice boating!) Around Tampa Bay? ( I leave out Miami, as
earlier posts were critical of it’s generally light winds and lack of waves).

The main requirement is a region with a relatively dense population of sailing clubs within a few
hours of each other. These clubs need to attract young athletes from the general population.
Yacht clubs could / might provide some of this support if they would adopt an open, welcoming
membership policy for youth. Then there needs to be an orientation to Olympic class boats, or
at least other high performance dinghies. Team coaching with year round training, clinics and
regattas are fundamental program elements. Regional poles of excellence could be established
by class. Links to local high school and college programs would be ok, but a separate regatta
format and schedule necessary. Give the high school and college kids something else /
additional to do, in more interesting boats.

Some programs could be linked with boarding schools set up to support the kids who can’t
commute. Thinking out of the box required.

Think of all the other Olympic sports. Kids in their teens are present. Track & field. Gymnastics.
Tennis. Soccer. Swimming & water polo. Cycling. Skiing. Hockey. And, yes, sailing (from other
countries). While some athletes carry their careers into their 30s and beyond, most of them
start their international competitions in their teens or early 20s.

Someplace in the US should be able to re-orient it’s junior sailing into a comprehensive regional
program so as to offer young sailors the opportunity to compete internationally with success. At
22 or 23 years old, they should be already shooting for top 10 finishes in the ISAF World Cup
regattas. And medals down the line. – Glen Bishop

November 27th, 2012

Article Separator

Every now and then I take a photo that makes me feel really good about our sport. So often what we see hear or read is all about the latest and greatest technology but in reality it all boils down to what those two boats are doing here. This photo taken off Williamstown Melbourne Australialast weekend shows two boys running downwind in an International Cadet while behind them sails a glorious example of yachting history. - SPORTSCAR

November 26th, 2012

Article Separator

The ‘spy vs. spy’ clause in the protocol for the 34th America’s Cup has already been bloodied; Last week, Oracle Team USA’s Matty Mason really wanted to see what made those darned ETNZ/LR boats foil so much better than the Oracle boat; at least according to a protest filed last week by Luna Rossa.

It alleges (with photographic proof and trigonometry) that Mason’s RIB was inside 100 meters when he was photographing the Italian boat; well within the 200-meter boundary prescribed by the protocol.  Read the protest here; if proven, what do you think the penalty should be?

November 26th, 2012

Article Separator

The Red  Bull Youth America’s Cup is a bit of a red-headed stepchild right now.  No one really wants to claim it as their event, and from the dearth of info coming from the teams and ACEA, we’re guessing people are keeping their mouths closed because they just have no idea what is going to happen.   Teams all over the world are scrambling for money, for time, and for some clear and concise entry/tryout process; something that’s eluded the organizers thus far.

Hell, up until a few weeks ago, the guys in charge were still trying to find an alternative to the AC45, presumably because they were (are?) worried the 45 is going to kill a kid or two, or the kids are going to fold an AC45 in half.  So while we can’t tell you what the hell is happening with the RBYAC, we can tell you that a few teams actually went sailing in San Francisco last week in some kind of tryout.  And we only know this because Genny told us so, in this video.  You can stay up to date in the most logical place to do so; the AC Anarchy forum, of course!  There’s some Facebook spot too…title courtesy of a G Love and Special Sauce.

November 26th, 2012

Article Separator

What?? Nothing goes over 68 knots! Nothing, unless it is Sailrocket! From skipper Paul Larson:

Hey anarchists… fresh off the TRIMBLE… 65.45 average 68.01 knots for 1 second. I am… speechless. Performance sailing has entered a new era. We did battle with speed-spot today and we came away friends. I could walk away from speedsailing today and say “job done”. Tomorrow… well, I’ll worry about that then. This is a special time. I’m glad we shared it here. Cheers, from us to you. Thread here.

November 24th, 2012

Article Separator

This Vendee Globe report is brought to you by Bruce Schwab Energy Systems!

Now two weeks into this Vendée Globe race, the dust is beginning to settle on an ever-shrinking fleet of Open 60’s that is rapidly reaching South, the equator in their wakes and Roaring 40’s over the horizon. A definite pecking order has been established by this point of the race with the fleet compressing in the doldrums, only to stretch back out in it’s original formation. At the top of the fleet, the sisterships “Banque Populaire” and “MACIF” still lead with the fleet’s other two VPLP’s, “PRB” and “Virbac-Paprec 3”still in hot pursuit. The latter 3 boats quickly legged out on the Juan K designed “Cheminees Poujoulat” and previous generation Farr “Hugo Boss” after the 5 boats found themselves virtually re-starting the Vendée in the doldrums, oftentimes drifting around as one 5-boat cluster of carbon and flogging racing sails.

Bernard Stamm’s “Cheminees Poujoulat” even flogged a genoa so hard in the light-air mess after a squall that the sail ripped itself on a daggerboard! Meanwhile, the 3 oldest skippers in the fleet continue to sail in close formation some 300 miles back of the leaders, while Acciona and skipper “Bubi” Sanso attempt to bridge the gap and re-engage the middle of the pack, having cleared the doldrums while the fleet’s backmarkers are still floundering in the dreaded ITCZ, called “the worst ever” by previous Vendée winner Vincent Riou. And in an unfortunate announcement that many of us saw coming, Polish skipper “Gutek” has officially abandoned the race on “Energa”, and has sailed to port in the Canary Islands. The leaders are now approaching a complex Saint Helena High which will create opportunities to gain miles on competitors.

BREAKING NEWS: Vincent Riou on “PRB” has hit a floating metal “buoy” and has sustained damage to the bow of his Open 60. He will be evaluating the situation and making necessary repairs if feasible. The hull has become torn and delaminated for about one meter on the starboard side of the bow. This comes just a week after Riou’s last scare, when he hit a floating tree trunk at 18 knots.

VPLP’s continue to dominate up front

Winner of 2nd place in the last Vendée Globe, Armel Le Cleac’h is sailing a brilliant race at the front of the pack. Overhauling sistership “MACIF” more than a week ago west of the Canary Islands, the 35-year old “Banque Populaire” skipper has maintained the race lead for more than 8 consecutive days, having entered and exited the doldrums with a 5-boat pack sailing in his wake, waiting to attack at any given opportunity. Le Cleac’h achieved a major feat this week in becoming the first boat to cross equator, doing the deed in just more than 10 days and 19 hours.

Some 25 miles behind “Banque Pop”, the five boats in pursuit;”MACIF, PRB, Virbac-Paprec 3, Cheminees Poujoulat, and Hugo Boss” all enjoyed a restart Tuesday morning, with all five boats racing within one or two miles of each other for much of the day! Limping through the doldrums, called the “worst ever” by ’04 winner Riou, the five boat-pack immediately re-gained dispersion upon re-entering the South East trades, with the 3 newer, lighter VPLP boats easily pulling away from Alex Thomson in his previous generation Farr design, clearly superior in the 12 to 15-knot tradewind reaching conditions.

Having fought with “MACIF” and “Banque Pop” seemingly since beginning of the race, Swiss sailor Bernard Stamm and “Cheminees Poujoulat” have been relegated to the back of the lead pack to battle with Alex Thomson on “Hugo Boss”, both skippers undergoing onboard repairs while simultaneously trying to keep pace with the four French leaders. Alex Thomson has finally fixed his hydrogenerator that was damaged six days ago in the same incident that left him repairing a carbon-fiber rudder tie bar in the cockpit.

The hydrogenerator (is) back down and working which is relief and it’s nice to be able to concentrate on something other than fixing stuff,” said the Hugo Boss skipper. “The temperature wasn’t too bad but it’s a really fiddly job; drill, clean, screw, while you’re doing that stuff at a 30 degrees of heel.

Bernard Stamm on the other hand was having his own problems, “The sea was pretty chaotic and in a windless area, the boat was shaken really hard, one of the centreboards went up and it tore up the genoa. In order to keep progressing, I had to take a route that goes further east than the others, otherwise it would have slowed me down a lot”, said a fatigued Stamm, who is also nearing completion of some necessary repairs to his autopilot. Sailing more upwind and making easting, as the other lead boats were genoa reaching due South, Stamm may end up staying par for the course with Dick, Riou and Gabart as he reaches stronger breeze before the other 3, allowing him to gain back some miles that he has lost in the past 3 days.

What’s ahead for the leaders

Currently sailing some 300-odd miles south east of the eastern most point of Brazil and South America, the leaders still have 2,700 miles to sail until the Cape of Good Hope with the major challenge being in negotiating the currently active yet relatively stable Saint Helena High. With a weak low off of South America and a strengthening High, the isobars could compress and create a strong northerly flow for the leaders to ride South before heading East. If this does indeed play out, the front pack could have a ripping ride into the Southern Ocean.

7 skippers penalized for violating Traffic Separation Scheme off Finisterre

Following the protest by both “Hugo Boss” and the Race Committee, 7 boats in the fleet have been penalized for violating the Finisterre Traffic Separation scheme. Seeing as how two fishing boats were hit by screaming Open 60’s with presumably sleeping skippers, this is an issue that the Vendée Globe is taking very seriously. The penalized boats were “Synerciel, Mirabaud, Acciona, Initiatives-couer and Energa”, who were all given 2-hour time penalties. “Gamesa” was given a 30-minute penalty and “Virbac-Paprec 3” was given a 20-minute penalty. Javier Sanso on “Acciona” and Tanguy de Lamotte on “Initiatives-couer” both appealed the jury’s ruling, but lost their appeals. Per race rules, the skippers had two days to take their penalties, and all have now done so.

Three “50-something’s” still occupy middle of the fleet

In what has been one of the most entertaining and long-lasting battles of this Vendée Globe, 3 of the oldest skippers left in the fleet have been in a 3-way drag race since the Cape Verde Islands. All in their 50’s and all sailing last-generation boats, these 3 ultra-experienced skippers have been sailing very smart, fast and consistent races, merely waiting for a handful of newer, faster boats to falter before moving into podium positions. Leading the pack is Mike Golding on his extensively refit and modernized Owen Clarke designed “Gamesa”, sailing some 300 miles back of race leader Le Cleac’h. Incredibly, this week marked Golding’s 22nd crossing of the equator!
50 miles in Golding’s wake is the always joking Jean Le Cam on “Synerciel”, who, despite not gaining any miles on the English skipper in the past 24 hours, has declared that he is “hunting Brits”.

Says Le Cam, “The boat is going so fast, I left the Swiss (Dominique Wavre) behind and it’s now time to attack my British friend. The next ones to pass are foreigners. First Golding, then a Swiss (Stamm), then another Brit (Thomson), I’m definitely into international hunting. The skippers after them are all from Lorient or Port-la-Forêt, not as much fun. I don’t care about my actual speed, I just want to make sure I’m faster than the others. And I am faster than Wavre and Golding.” Le Cam’s own record time to the equator of 10 days and 11 hours during the 2004 Vendée will stand for at least four more years.

“Bubi” tries to bridge the gap

One of the boats making the biggest moves on the race course is Javier “Bubi” Sanso on “Acciona 100% Ecopowered”. The latest-generation Owen Clarke design blasted through the doldrums, having now caught and passed the third pack of boats since stopping in the lee of the Canary Islands to ascend his mast for repairs. Taking a very easterly route across the doldrums, the Spanish skipper was able to make massive gains on both Arnaud Boissieres on “Akena Verandas” and Bertrand de Broc on “Votre nom autour du monde”. 

From Bubi:

Hello sailing anarchists from around the globe…..!

It was a rough start on Acciona EcoPowered….a hardware piece from the KARVER headboard car broke leaving the main sail happily swinging free from the halyard and the headboard at the top of the mast……The story might have finished here but I had to go up to get the headboard with a very bad sea and gale behind me.  To cut a long story short I had to go to the leeward side of Tenerife, climb the mast, get the headboard, and exchange it for a new one…….all in all losing me nearly 400 miles of racing.

I’m now in the southern hemisphere with its typical trade winds, squally conditions and typically frustrating as I cannot get on the rails; the winds keep fluctuating left and right, up and down…..I’m starting to make some south finally and not so west. The energy systems are working really well, I’ve had my batteries 100% charged in the afternoon everyday for the last 3 days…….the system works. In the south I will have to combine it with the hydros but it’s no problem. It is really good not having to start an engine to charge the batteries in these conditions where it is 39 degrees inside the cabin…… I will keep you posted!!

NO PETROL ON BOARD
bubi

While Boissieres floundered around averaging 5 knots for more than a day and a half, losing more than 200 miles by being further west, Sanso came screaming through maintaining 8-9 knot averages on his crossing, to become one of the fleet’s biggest winners in the doldrums. Another benefactor of the doldrums is young Tanguy de Lamotte, the 34 year old Vendée rookie who is still putting together an amazing race on his three-generation old Lombard design. Tanguy is sailing in “Acciona’s” wake as this 4-boat strong third group exits the doldrums.
Look for Bertrand de Broc to put the hammer back down after a sub-stellar doldrums crossing. The veteran skipper had been flying until following Boissieres into a massive hole in the doldrums, allowing “Acciona” and “initiatives-couer” to make massive gains and slip by. Expect Bertrand to pass two boats in the next week.

Alessandro charging at the back of the fleet

You’ve got to love what Alessandro di Benedetto is doing onboard “Team Plastique” at the back of the fleet. On a 15 year old boat with the only fixed-keel in the fleet, Di Benedetto took advantage of 18-knot broad-reaching conditions from the Cape Verde Islands to the ITCZ, posting up the fleet’s best 24-hour runs on two days, and gaining back some 300 miles on the leaders and more than 500 back on Boissieres. With a position even more easterly than Bubi and Lamotte, Alessandro is in the doldrums now. A speedy crossing will see him retain some or most of the miles that he has re-gained in the past few days. Not only has Alessandro been sailing his old boat near her full potential, but his infectious enthusiasm and energy for the race are contagious when watching his videos.

Gutek officially retires

Polish skipper Zbigniew “Gutek” Gutkowski has retired to Tenerife, in the Canary Islands. The previous generation Finot/ Conq design (ex-Hugo Boss) had been plagued with problems since Day 1, and most recently had sustained autopilot failures which reported in his crash-gybing and badly wrapping a gennaker around his forestay. Sailing East to test both of his autopilots after updating the software, he had to resign himself to his inner thoughts:

Today I need to officially announce what I’ve been thinking about for days.. Being brave is not only about fighting, it is also about knowing where to stop. I know I did everything I could, working on my electronics issues for many days. I know my team and friends did their best as well. And I am extremely grateful for the huge support I got. But I can’t carry on like that. When there is big wind and when the boat is going over 15 knots the autopilot starts to live a second life, doing whatever it wants…. Having no autopilot means I can’t race, and if I can’t race, I have to retire.”

Beyou’s keel jack failure…

Jeremie Beyou, skipper of “Maitre CoQ”, has discovered what may be an explanation for his keel jack failure: “It probably happened as we were leaving the front off the Canary Islands. There was a 40-knot wind and a very rough cross sea. As I was going down after surfing a wave, I must have hit a UFO with the side of my keel bulb, because you can clearly see an impact there. This probably put an unusual pressure on the keel head. And then time passed and a couple of days later, the jack head broke because it had been weakened by the shock. After a thorough analysis of the part and discussions with experts, that’s te likeliest explanation”, says the two-time Figaro winner.

Sam Davies “hitch hikes” to France

Saveol skipper Samantha Davies explains “We’re only 24 miles away from Cascais and we’re in an area where all cargo ships are goig north. We thought maybe we could hitch-hike, as they’re probabaly all going to France… But despite our sign and our motivation, we haven’t been very successful. We’ll keep trying, though. Maybe Erwan (Saveol’s boat captain) should hide inside and I should wear a miniskirt, alone on the deck with my sign, I’m sure it would work better. We’ll see… Love, Sam.”

Stay tuned to Sailing Anarchy and our next Vendée Globe update, coming in just a few days as the leaders approach the Roaring 40’s and the Southern Ocean!

-Ronnie Simpson

November 24th, 2012

Article Separator

Like the book, there’s a hell of a lot more to see here than the cover. Check back later for more! Awesome work by the legendary Christophe Launay.

November 24th, 2012

Article Separator

Thanksgiving wishes from yer pals at SA and SpeedDream. We’ll be enjoying the long weekend – and hope you do too!

November 22nd, 2012

Article Separator

Another interesting discussion – imagine that – on of AC Anarchy forum brought to you by The Great Cup but this post made us laugh. Good times.

I’m sure others will be along soon enough to pile on top of your never ending comments of “everything Kiwi rules, and everything USA sucks, especially anything to do with Russell”….but for the moment I’ll leave that alone.

I’ll say that I agree with you on one point, the Red Bull Flugtag.  Pretty sure that wasn’t really well thought out, at least in terms of the reflection on Oracle/Larry.  When the idea of putting pieces of 7217.1 together for this event first came out, I cringed.  I could see what could potentially happen.  You know this event is designed as a spectator stunt, so it is going to be a show that involves not achievement, but disaster.  Probably to get higher ratings they should have put a Kardashian in as the pilot.

So, while the crash of 17 played out on the interweb around the world, it was just a sporting thing.  Now, with the bits of the boat taking a swan dive off a platform, you just had to know that somewhere in the next tech conference by SAP/IBM/MS that footage will be used to make a joke about Oracle/Larry crashing.  It happened faster than I thought it would, what with the banner ad on Bloomberg.com the last couple of days talking about the continuing crash of 17.  A banner ad that touts “Larry Ellison’s $8 million yacht crashing”.  A banner ad. Go figure.

Your rant is more about ACEA than it is about the team, and most know I was not in love with the direction ACEA took things early on.  So the designers tried something and it didn’t work out so well.  Anyone remember The Hula?  Or a broken mast in a Cup race?  How did all that work out for the Kiwi culture?

And here’s another question – how much money has Larry Ellison injected into the Kiwi economy since he started Oracle Racing?  How many Kiwi’s have made how much money from him?  What’s his payroll been for Kiwi sailors, designers, builders ect?  How much money has resulted from the construction of boats and parts in Kiwiville?  He didn’t have to relax the CiC rule, yet he did for this cycle, and the net result of both his boat and Luna Rosa building a substantial part of their boat in Kiwiville.  So, you want to talk about globalism, multicultural this and that, and be the recipient of foreign funds into your country, but yet you also want to scold those who dare to be different than your view of what appropriate culture should be.  Seriously, is that a very enlightened world view?

Please, stop with all this cultural self-righteousness and polarization.  ETNZ has a very good boat, but it remains to be seen how it will perform on SFO Bay.

Enjoy the show for what it is, but leave the cultural dissection for something that matters.  No one, absolutely no, is going to give a rats ass about the culture of a kiwi sailing team, at least in the terms of solving global hunger. Join the fun!

November 22nd, 2012

Article Separator

Two days after finally smashing the Outright world speed sailing record, the Vestas Sailrocket 2 team decide to tackle the ‘Nautical Mile’ world record which was held by the mighty ‘Hydroptere’. It was always going to be an interesting challenge for the VSR2 team as the speed course that they sail on in Walvis Bay, Namibia is defined by a beach which is exactly 1.04 miles long. This requires them to launch the boat out in more exposed waters and try and get up to as high a speed as they dare in rough water before they hit the start of the mile. At the end of the course they also fire out into rough water and have to bring the boat to a stop. It’s hard on the boat. The beach is not straight but has a slight curve in it .

The mile is measured by TRIMBLE GPS equipment in a straight line so pilot Paul Larsen needs to balance between sailing in close to the beach for the flat water… and sailing the straightest and hence shortest distance between A and B. In this run, with winds that averaged just under 25 knots, 

The team smashed not only the nautical mile record* by over 5 knots averaging over 55.3 knots… but also raised their own ‘Outright speed’ record* to 59.38 knots over 500 meters hitting a peak speed of 64.78 knots (74.55 mph, 120 kph).

For Larsen it was the perfect payback for 10 years chasing ‘the perfect reach’. Speed sailing had paid him back in full and a dream was realised.

VSR2 performed exactly as predicted by the Sailrocket design team of Malcolm Barnsley and Chris Hornzee Jones at AEROTROPE. The spec for the boat was to be able to hit 65 knots in 26 knots of wind in order to average around 60 knots. * All records subject to WSSRC ratification

Directed, filmed and edited by Ben Holder.

November 22nd, 2012

Article Separator

An awesome shot from racing in the last regatta of 2012 at the Yacht Club de l’Ile de France. Thanks to Anarchist Loic.

November 22nd, 2012

Article Separator

Cutting through the heavy chop the turquoise sheen of the upper layers of water give way to the deep and dark expanse beneath. Just like the night sky, the more you stare at it the less sure you are what is out there. All of a sudden I race towards a steepening swell laden with ripples and white caps, approaching the wave from behind I reach its crest momentarily pausing, struggling for speed and power, urging my kite over the threshold, diving it searching for the extra power locked in the breeze to propel me over the edge.

Like reaching the top of a mountain you stand at its peak, overlooking the surroundings and just like any other mountain there is always the descent, freefalling down its face barely in control, a seemingly everlasting wave I bounce down it’s face, high above me the kite sits in the sky, stationary as I race towards it blasting down into the trough of the wave. This seems to be a familiar process, one which seems to go on and on, from one hour to the next, one day to the next and even one country to the next” Read on.

November 22nd, 2012

Article Separator

Good times at Tufts. Thanks to Anarchist Rolfe.

November 22nd, 2012

Article Separator

So many possibilities, only one answer

November 22nd, 2012

Article Separator

Can’t get enough Vendee Globe Action? Watch the documentary film about the 2008/2009 race. It’s called Racing Around the World Alone – RATWA. It is available to rent or own – download it now on iTunes and Amazon. Click on this link to go to the official RATWA film website and watch the film’s trailers.”

November 22nd, 2012

Article Separator

Some good Samaritans and a hard-working shore crew have Sam Davies back at sea.  Hopefully a borrowed mast from a wrecked First Class 8 in Madeira, a Laser sail and her O60 storm jib will get her home to France.  As long as she’s out there, we’ll be watching.  Meanwhile, while Armel Le Cleach continues to hold his lead on the fleet, just 4 miles separates the five boats who trail him.  Attrition aside, it’s setting up to be a serious battle as the fleet heads into the Southern Atlantic; track them here. 

You can watch too in the Vendee Globe thread, which was already the most active English-speaking forum anywhere to follow the world’s toughest sailboat race before our most recent round of crowd-sourced innovations; subtitling!  Believe it or not, rather than complaining about the dearth of English-language videos coming from the competitors, your friendly Anarchists have actually used Youtube to subtitle many of them in English.  The subbed videos (like this one of a half-naked Alessandro Benedetto) are all posted in the thread; just click on the little ‘closed caption’ button to check them out.

We still have some great info from France coming up for you over the next week; a few more interviews as well as a final guide to all Clean and Ronnie’s stories, vids, and analysis.  And we’ll go ahead and thank the companies that supported our extensive VG coverage thus far:Bruce Schwab Energy SystemsDoyle Sails NZWhiteCap LTD, and LINE HONORS - Yacht Racing Outfitters.  Check ‘em out and tell ‘em we sent ya.

November 21st, 2012

Article Separator

We have known these folks for years and they are some of the most righteous people we have ever known. If ever there was a good thing to get behind, this is certainly one. If we had the dough, we’d make this happen for them, but we don’t. However, we know there are more than a few folks who could make a huge difference in some people’s life experience. Might you be one of them?


Challenged America needs your help! We have a group of recently disabled veterans who are great sailors and would like to do next years Transpac. But we need a boat!
Challenged America, an all volunteer program, has been assisting people with disabilities get on the water sailing since 1978 in San Diego. We are also veterans of the 2003 and 2005 Transpacs and we are determined to race next year. We are looking for a donation of a 45-70 foot racing sailboat capable of doing the race. If you are a boat owner and looking into donation let’s talk. If you know a boat owner considering donation please let us know.

Of course any donation would be tax detectable as we are a 501 (c) 3 charity. Check our our website for info on our sailing programs. If you have any questions call Dave at   619-405-6770  or e-mail on the Challenged America website.

November 21st, 2012

Article Separator

http://vimeo.com/offcenter/adventuress

ADVENTURESS Sets Sail from Rockport Marine from OffCenterHarbor.com on Vimeo.

The legendary 83′ Fife schooner ADVENTURESS sets sail after a three-year restoration at Rockport Marine in Rockport, Maine. This video was produced and directed by OffCenterHarbor.com in association with Langley Multimedia.

November 21st, 2012

Article Separator

Sailing yachts continue their duty in the drug muling business; 204 kilos of coke were found in the 13 meter boat “JeReve” last week after it ran aground in Tonga.  Authorities had been tracking the boat since the US Drug Warriors tagged it leaving Ecuador, though it had disappeared from their radar after leaving the Cook Islands.  The fact that they lost the drug runner weeks before and only found it after it was beached didn’t keep Australian Federal Police from claiming a grand success for Public Health everywhere with the seizure of the soggy drugs.  A badly rotted body was found aboard; so decomposed that cause of death still hasn’t been determined.   Lesson:  204 kilos of cocaine is dangerous cargo.

The crew on the Tonga smuggler didn’t make out so well, but a couple of sailors may have made off with a fortune in drugs if locals in Nova Scotia are to be believed.  They say they saw the crew of a 12m yacht scurrying around on deck removing items before the boat was scuttled and the crew, dressed in black, came ashore in a RIB – which they then abandoned.  Among the items removed: The mast.

Just how much coke could you fit in the mast of a 40 footer?

November 21st, 2012

Article Separator

This is the kind of display of nature’s awesomeness that we are extremely happy not to be seeing from a boat.  ‘Cause that would just suck. Sick From NSW, OZ; thanks to Anarchist PBO for sharing.

November 21st, 2012

ropeye banner 3 25

sapphire 27

rbs banner ad

ewol banner ad

uk ad 4 3

fisheries banner 9 4

swing keel ad.jpg_sml

ullman banner 7 24

hh banner purple

anchor new ad

http://www.camet.com/

Gunboat 60 sailing in Annapolis, MD.

salty tag 2

race q banner ad

FSS_SA

melges banner 10 14

fisheries watch ad 9 18

pyi banner ad

weta banner 2 9

c c 8 7 ad

http://www.shaw650.com/

velocitek banner 10 14

hh banner green

karver ad 1 14

sound ad 4 23

http://www.lymanmorse.com

ner 2

http://www.dryuv.com

seascape banner

http://www.quantumsails.com/

BBY_SA

schwab tall banner ad

http://www.mauriprosailing.com/

torqeedo small ad

fireball banner ad

helly 10 9 side banner

farr 280 banner 9 4

c tech 9 22

fastsailing_sailing_anarchy

http://www.crowleys.com/