hh banner green

http://www.crowleys.com/

seascape banner

vela banner 2 15

fireball banner ad

photo boat banner ad

columbia banner 2 15

weta banner 2 9

http://www.shaw650.com/

BBY_SA

bmc_ad

schwab tower ad 1 15

http://www.mauriprosailing.com/

lemon and line

farr 280 banner 9 4

helly 10 9 side banner

a 40 banner ad

sapphire 27

velocitek banner 12 16

http://www.lymanmorse.com

west system fp banner ad 1 15

pyi banner ad

karver ad 1 14

c tech 9 22

http://www.dryuv.com

rapido banner 2 red

fisheries 12 1

uk banner ad 3 15

infiniti vanner ad 12 14

fisheries banner 9 4

fast sailing banner 2

sail racer 3 15

nosa banner 12 18

ullman banner ad 2 15

http://www.camet.com/

race q banner ad

swing keel ad.jpg_sml

FSS_SA

hh banner purple

Gunboat 60 sailing in Annapolis, MD.

melges banner 10 14

ropeye banner 3 25

boat tent banner ad

ewol banner ad

rbs banner ad

latis banner  2 15

whitecap fp ad

VX-One-550x150-Bnr_V3

mc 38 31 banner

volvo 70 charter

mauri 3 1 SA-Top-Rotate

southern banner 2 15

tan banner 10 14

Gunboat 5501 in Newport, RI.

b&g banner 10 7

nke 3 15

Article Separator

Emirates Team New Zealand finally put a foot wrong earlier today, but despite looking quite scary, the team got off lightly; no injuries and just a day or two in repair time. Today was meant to be Wing No. 2′s debut, but accounts say it was wing 1 that got bit during launch on a very gusty Tuesday.  Maybe the team were practicing high-wind launch techniques…

Of course there’s only one place in the world you can go to have a real online discussion on any of the AC boats, and that’s our AC Anarchy forum.  The ETNZ Launch thread now has nearly 8,000 posts and a half million views…join them.

March 19th, 2013

Article Separator

Anarchist BJ is in the midst of a long-distance cruise with the fam. Sometimes things go wrong…

In hindsight we agreed that to date, it was the most terrifying thing we’ve dealt with on the boat so far. Something in fact that most people hope never to deal with.

Everything started out according to plan. We took some Stugeron Thursday night and went to bed, no seasickness for us! The alarm went off at some ridiculous hour when it was still dark. Maybe a second alarm went off, or it was a snooze…this part was a bit blurry…but we got up, hauled anchor and were on our way by about 0430. In the pitch black we were motoring, picking our way out of the channel into North Sound on Virgin Gorda then heading East towards the Anageda Passage. We slipped out some reefed main and decided to motor sail until we could SEE the sails. The wind was cooperating, the waves weren’t too bad.

Around six in the morning the glow of sunrise has started to take the edge of the stygian black of the deep hours of the night and we decided we could see well enough to start sailing. Out came the headsail and we started to trim it then BANG! We heard a loud bang and crash and things felt wrong. It wasn’t quite light yet, but we quickly spotted our backstay whipping around in the air over our heads and our radar lying on the deck over the life lines. Major rig failure – one of the worst things to happen at sea with the sails up! Read on.

 

March 19th, 2013

Article Separator

Finally, a way to make a J/105 go in light air. Photo from the sucky ocean courses at the sucky dago nood.

 

March 18th, 2013

Article Separator

Preview

Feeling the need for speed, landsailors will gather during the last week in March 2013, on Ivanpah Dry Lake to sail in the premier American landsailing regatta known as AMERICA’S LANDSAILING CUP.  80 + competitors will race in fleets ranging from Miniclass yachts upward to International Class II yachts. Races will be held daily (wind permitting) and spectators are welcome. Watching (or participating) in racing where yachts regularly round leeward marks at 60 mph, is amazing!

Ivanpah dry lake, off I-15 at the California-Nevada state line, a few miles from Las Vegas, is arguably the fastest sailing surface on the planet, home to several past records and the current sail-powered speed record of just over 126 mph.  In some ways, it is the speed of normal landsailers that is more remarkable. In daily course racing the smallest racers will hit close to 50 mph while the bigger boats will be cruising closer to 100 mph.

Visit the event, check out the landsailers, meet the sailors and watch a few races. It’s quite an experience. After racing ends (daily) there’s usually some time to catch a ride or try out one of the yachts. Later, walk about the campsites and visit some friendly sailors, parties and campfires.

Info can be found at NALSA.org. See the events calender for dates and directions to Ivanpah Dry Lake and hotel accommodations  in Primm, Nevada. We hope to see you on the dirt!

March 18th, 2013

Article Separator


It’s a Mini Transat year, and we’re looking forward to a pile of great stories from the most anarchic race – and class – of all.  We’re stoked that America once again has a contender in what will be another huge fleet; Midwest native and shorthanded specialist Jeff MacFarlane already took the overall win in the first race of the year; the 190 NM Solo Roma Solo Race.  We caught up with Jeff for a little SA Innerview intro, and we encourage you to check out his page to stay on top of his upcoming campaign. 

SA: Minis seem like such a difficult ride; what’s it really like?

JM: Sailing on a mini is amazing and like no other sailing experience I’ve ever had. After doing so much doublehanded sailing back in the US, I thought I knew what it would be like, but it has far exceeded my expectations. Being alone on any boat gives me with a feeling of tremendous freedom and solitary reliance, it is hard to describe. This feeling of freedom and independence is intensified on the mini because no outside communication, laptops, or graphic GPS are allowed. Organizers even make everyone turn in their cellphones before a start! Because a prototype mini is a very technical and sensitive boat, I’m always working. I try constantly to tweak and adjust all of the different options to try to squeeze out every ounce of performance. The boat reacts to everything in an instant, and there are as many controls as you’d ever want.

SA:  The whole mini scene seems like something out of a reality show.  What’s the community like?

JM: The race scene is awesome! The skippers are extremely friendly and there is a great sense of camaraderie amongst us. Starting even before my first race I felt welcomed into the class. Between races, skippers arrange deliveries in convoy along with training sessions, and during events, you can forge all kinds of great friendships with numerous group dinners and hangouts.  All of the skippers have been more than willing to lend tools, translate racing documents, refer good subcontractors…but once the gun fires, it’s all business.  The mix of camaraderie, competition, and strong friendships built around a serious passion for the most unique of classes –  I just love it.

SA: What do you realistically hope to accomplish?

JM: Well, ideally, I’d like to win the race! Of course, that is my ultimate goal. And, I think that I am in an excellent position to succeed. already I’ve performed well in my first two races, taking home a 2nd and 3rd place finish [along with yesterday's first -ed]. I ended 2012 with a world ranking of 22, competing against guys who had been working on earning points all year.

On the way to trying to win , I’d really like to continue improving my ranking by sailing well in the races leading up to the MT. I think I am in a perfect position to help put mini racing, as well as more single handed ocean racing, on the map for Americans. At this point, there are so few Americans inovlved, but I’d like to change that by sharing my experiences.  It’s economical, incredibly challenging, and you learn so much about yourself as both a sailor and a person when you go for this kind of racing.   I’m convinced that sailors from all disciplines will love this style of racing if they only give it a try!  If I can encourage other Americans to come take a shot at the Minis, I’ll consider that a big success.

SA: You’ll be racing against some spectacular sailors who’ve been doing this since they’re teenagers. What will it take for you to win?

JF:  Without complete focus and determination, it would be impossible to win the MT,  but it takes a lot more than just that. There is tremendous skill needed for success, particularly in the areas of boat speed and simply self management. On top of that, knowledge about weather is absolutely essential. Without outside contact, understanding and predicting weather patterns helps with navigation and safety.  Keep in mind you are the only person on the boat, you have to be able to fix anything. A lot can happen over the course of the race, so you really need to be ready for anything and everything. Finally, it takes a fast boat.

SA: Why do you think you have a chance to win?

JM: I have the determination needed. I’ve always dreamed of winning the MT, it has literally been my goal since I started racing as a young child. But before competing against the sailors from Europe, I didn’t really know what I was up against. I have had wonderful successes in the U. S. and Australia, but until a few months ago, I didn’t know exactly what my competition would be like on the mini circuit. This type of sailing is in their blood and they have a tremendous amount of experience doing it. But I do realize how much work I need to do before the race. My schedule from now until the start of the race is simply to race and train. I don t think there will be another sailor on the starting  line who will prepare as much as me. Finally, and crucially, I have a quick boat. I am racing the Marc Lombard designed proto #716, a boat with a fantastic history.  HP Schipman works for Lombard, and he not only had the boat designed by his own firm, but he built the boat himself.

SA: The few Americans who’ve done it seem to fade away after completing a Mini Transat.  Where do you go?

JM: As I said earlier, winning this race has been a long time goal, but competing on the circuit also brings me closer to achieving some of my other deep rooted goals as well. Ultimately, I would like to compete in the Vendee Globe, and I think competing in the Mini is really the first step in making that dream into a reality.

March 18th, 2013

Article Separator

A little Big Pimpin’ for you Midwesterners…

Crowley’s Yacht Yard’s spring open house, Yachtapalooza, is here.  Our annual event this year is sure to top any previous years, especially now that we have the permission to fire off flares. There will be tons of seminars and demonstrations including upwind sail trim with Perry Lewis of North Sails, racing rules with Todd Patton of UK Sailmakers, teak care maintenance, sail drive maintenance, a MOM8 ejection, fire fighting (yes a real diesel fire), and more. Did we mention free stuff and Chicago’s earliest CR 914 regatta of the year?

There are tons of door prizes for seminar attendees from Adidas, Bainbridge, Sikkens, and more. With over 20 vendors rep’n their goods, free stuff, big discounts in the Ship’s Store, the Spaceship Tamale food truck pimpin’ the most amazing gourmet tamales you’ll ever eat, the time spent at Yachtapalooza is sure to be worthwhile.

Have questions? Go to our Yachta page .  See you on March 23rd (8am and 4pm).  Oh, one of the local yacht clubs will be having “Aftapalooza” (read –drink specials) so be sure to save some room for cheap beer after chompin’ the tamales.

 

March 18th, 2013

Article Separator

And you think you have long courses…

 

March 18th, 2013

Article Separator

An update from Shane Perrin and his Everglades Challenge adventures

Post race/ expedition life has been an adjustment. It will be a 4 week recovery period. The tough part is That at work for the parks dept it is mulching season. That’s a lot of labor. So recovery is not as it should be. For the most part I am trying to spend as much time with my family as possible. I left them for 2 weeks which is hard to do. Even harder is my wife and mother in-law had our 2 young kids to take care of. It’s a lot of work.

So as some of you may have read, I made it home at 5am Wednesday after my crew drove straight through the night and made it to work for 6:45am and worked til 3pm. Then made it home to my family. I apologize that I have not been able to thank everyone that donated individually. My nights after work have been filled with chasing kids around the house, changing diapers, and answering the 586 emails in my inbox. Also I’ve been busy with interviews for radio spots, online articles, and magazines. More.

 

March 18th, 2013

Article Separator

When we’ve got too much video to show, we put it all in one place.  Enjoy this edition of Video Anarchy.

underwater redux

Ever since our first Underwater Anarchy piece we’ve had a hard-on for a beneath-the-surface look at racing boats.  Here, Quantum TV gives us some of what we love from the recent Miami TP52 Worlds.

a new endeavour

The castrated Speedboat is due in Sydney in just a few days with some serious work ahead to get her on the line for the 2013 Hobart, and our friends at Endeavour Quay in Portsmouth Harbour gave us a time-lapse look at what it took to get her to sea.

 spring sprung

SA’er ‘skiffman’ writes “After all these videos of guys blasting around down under in 20 knots and 35 degrees we were getting pretty jealous up in the UK freezing our nuts off. Finally, here’s a glimpse of summer ahead!”

france on fire

The French economy may be in the crapper, but no one seems to have told Lionel Lemonchois or his vegetable-producting sponsors at Prince De Bretagne, who’ve funded a brand new 80-foot trimaran for the French solo offshore star.  It’s a big jump up for the sponsor’s 50-footer, with a target to win the big boy class at the Route Du Rhum.

laser vision

19 year old Jeremy O Connell wants to go to the Olympics, and if he keeps getting awesome videos made like this one from up-and-comer Ben Hartnett, he’ll at least win the battle to get noticed.  Great cuts, sick slow-mo, hot underwater pieces, and some ballsy RIB driving make this one pop…we look forward to more work from young Ben.

 

March 18th, 2013

Article Separator

The Professional Kiteboard Riders Association (PKRA) World tour is going to start next week in Dakhla, Morocco, and here is rider Manuela Jungo (5th overall, 2012). Yes, there are other great pictures of  Manuela, this week’s SCOTW, but we chose this one for our mythical front page. Does that make us bad? Okay, okay, here’s the video with some actual sailing!

 

March 15th, 2013

Article Separator

Doing something he swore he would never do again (gee, we’ve never heard that before) The Ed is sailing in the Dago nood starting tomorrow, in an Ultimate 20.  The only saving grace to this lame event is that some of the classes (including the U 20) are sailing in the South Bay out of Coronado Yacht Club.

Having finally dropped their ridiculous US Ailing membership requirement for entry, the nood is still rife with officious bullshit: Entering is not enough, you must also register and if you don’t register, you won’t be an official entrant. Oh and part of that registration is that you must have your crew waiver form not only signed by the skipper and crew, it also must be witnessed. JFC, why not require that it be notarized as well? And the complete nonsense of being required to buy $45 wristbands to be able to enter their precious parties is a farce. We’re sure there will be plenty of industry glad-handers there,  but as usual, The Ed won’t be one of them.  Thanks to Eminem for the title inspiration.

Update: With a crewmember calling in sick Friday am, a last-minute replacement, and a really bad opening race that saw us drop from 4th to DFL because we couldn’t get the kite up, The Sparkle Pony Princess got a 3rd in race two, but  had to bail on race 3 in order for me to pick up my kids by 5pm.  Crewmember is still sick though, and no replacements around so we’re gonna call this one a day. The U20 is a cool little boat with a good class full of nice folks. Bummer that we can’t be a part of it all – Ed.

March 15th, 2013

Article Separator

For the polar opposite of the conditions that our lovely SCOTW Manuela sails in, there’s this shot from Opti training  in Norway last week (just -8c and 15 knots wind!) from Anarchist Peer. Um kids, you know what to choose…

 

March 15th, 2013

Article Separator

Preview

The 2013 US Trimaran Nationals will be held April 25 – 28. This event is open to production and custom trimarans and will be co-hosted by the Pensacola Beach Yacht Club and Pensacola Yacht Club. The event typically comprises all Farrier and Corsair designs as well as any trimaran with a PHRF rating.

This regatta, first held in 1995 is the original Trimaran Rendezvous in the US and features many perpetual trophies to be sailed for in addition to the traditional Class awards. The Ian Farrier Trophy is for the overall fleet winner and was captured in 2012 at Fort Walton Yacht Club by the team of Bob Hodges and Donnie and Andrew Brennan on their Corsair Sprint 750. The “Amateur Crew Award,” presented by Don Wigston and his company Windcraft waits on the shelf as well as a Distance Traveled Award and the Farrier 27 Sailboat Hall of Fame award.
The fleet will include defending champion Hodges and previous winners Randy Smyth of Fort Walton Beach, FL, Don Wigston from Mary Esther, FL, and Mike Parsons from Madisonville, LA.

The event will commence on Friday the 26th with a fifteen mile race from Pensacola Beach to Juana’s Pagoda in Navarre for lunch, followed by a return race back to Pensacola Beach. On Saturday morning the fleet will sail into Pensacola Bay with a “steeplechase” race to Fort Pickens located at the pass at the mouth of the bay. Following lunch on the beach, buoy racing will continue on the bay in the afternoon. On Sunday the schedule will conclude with more buoy racing followed by awards. The NOR (under Events) and electronic entry forms (under Racing) are here.

Title inspiration thanks to The Crystal Method.

March 15th, 2013

Article Separator

Former 18′ Skiff, I14, and 505 World Champ, Howie Hamlin has been turning over the keys to his second boat recently to get young guns, Dane Wilson, Quinn Wilson, and Riley Gibbs up to speed as sparing partners. The boys (17, 15, and 15 respectively) may have fewer year of sailing experience combined than any single member of Howie’s top caliber team, but their talent shines through to make the training sessions fun and competitive for everyone involved.

Bros. Dane and Quinn will be teaming up for their second ISAF Youth World Championship in the 29er class this summer, and Riley and Quinn will be shooting to qualify for the next Youth Worlds while they continue their 18 training.

March 14th, 2013

Article Separator

A couple of class organizations working together for the greater good…

Sailors for the Sea extends a thank you to Velocitek for their second year in a row of financial support. Since 2006 Velocitek has been a member of the environmental organization 1% for the Planet, a coalition of more than 1,000 businesses that donate 1% of their sales to a network of more than 3,000 environmental organizations worldwide.

Alec Stewart, president of Velocitek notes; “Velocitek is a company made up of people who love the ocean. Being based in Hawaii, we are surrounded by the ocean and we spend a lot of time playing in and on the water. We also realize that clean oceans are essential to our livelihood, and the success of the recreational marine industry as a whole. We believe that individually we have a small impact in preserving our oceans, but together, we can make a big difference. We support the ongoing commitment Sailors for the Sea has made to educating the sailing community on the threats to oceans and coastal waters and empowering sailors – from youth to experienced life-long recreational and professional sailors – on the actions they can take to protect marine health for generations to come.”

 

March 14th, 2013

Article Separator

Big Pimpin’

Get it together! From Do It Yourself Yachtbroker.

March 14th, 2013

Article Separator

UPDATE: Auckland Anarchists can get the inside story tonight at Swashbucklers on the Westhaven Marina Waterfront starting around 7:30 PM.  You wanna know the stuff I’m not allowed to write?  Buy me a Grey Goose and we’ll chat.  No swag to give away, but plenty of laughs likely.

Most of my sailing report from yesterday’s trip on ETNZ’s AC72 Aotearoa will come in video format on Monday, but based on my email, Facebook, and PM inbox blowing up today, interest is clearly pretty high.  So here’s a short summary of what I learned in my day with ETNZ:

You guys came up with some excellent questions and we sat down with the heads of the various ETNZ departments and got some good answers for you; you’ll have to wait until next week for the full conversation, all on camera.

As for sailing the boat, we had 9-12 knots of sea breeze; that translated into 16-18 knots of upwind speed at 42-44 degrees of TWA (something like 13 degrees AWA) and 26-30 knots downwind at TWA of 145 or so (22 degree AWA).  At these speeds, the boat is almost sedate; really forgiving, relatively easy to trim, tack, and gybe, and quite dry; in other words, there’s just no drama.  Same with the crew; you hardly notice anyone, because they do their jobs quickly, quietly and with their headsets on, you hardly hear a noise beyond the constant groaning and creaking of easing sheets.

Like many of our mothies have said from the start, this Cup will be won on the foils; to that end, the one area I wasn’t allowed to shoot was the dagger board cases, though frankly there is so much going on in there that I wouldn’t even know where to begin.  NZ is running two different board designs, each has a slightly different upright board profile and each sports a different angle between the horizontal and vertical arm; the more closed-off board (with a more acute angle) was the ‘easy foiling’ board; in about 22 knots the boat popped up, nearly all its weight supported by a 1.5 meter piece of carbon, the rest by the rudder elevator.  On the other board, the boat struggled to foil downwind in the light air; this is maybe a less draggy, higher speed board, or the fore/aft rake position they were working on produced less lift.  Note that 12 knots ain’t what this thing is designed for, but they still have to work out crossovers; there’s bound to be a case of ‘it’s not usually like this’ in San Francisco come this summer.  In any event, both foils are just testers, though given the 3-month time frame to produce new ones, ETNZ’s San Francisco foils are undoubtedly being built as we speak.

Wing number 2 is another monstrous red marvel of engineering, and a quick walk around showed it to be nothing revolutionary. “It’s more about having the controls we need to deal with all the circumstances we’ll face,” Dalton said.  Wing 2 will be stepped on Monday (weather permitting) and will see her first sail Tuesday or Wednesday.

ETNZ’s boat number one is in pieces, her diagonal beams and a few other bits having been scavenged to build boat number 2.  But number one will indeed be on the water soon; Dalts put together the budget he needed to get the spare boat ready for racing, and she’ll be ready to go in San Francisco in case Aotearoa gets t-boned or otherwise dies.

Luna Rossa and ETNZ are no longer training together; LR is in her modification phase, and needs to stay out of ETNZ’s prying eyes.  Bertelli’s team is trying some new toys out, including a pretty trick new main foil with some kind of innovative control system; unfortunately it blew up within a few moments of loading up on its first day, and they towed in after just a short time on the water.

And finally, yes – they are flying through the gybes on the foils.  Not in 12 knots of breeze, but I got one team member to admit to me that, in their best fully-foiling gybe the other day, their speed came down to 29 knots before building back to 40.  How’s that for ya?

Everyone wants to know if ETNZ is going to do the Volvo, and while they’re not making any big decisions right now, I can confidently report that the team will be back for the next VOR.  ”With the boats being one-design, there’s no real urgency to get everything done right now,” Dalts told me.  But they will be back, and they’ll probably be the favorites.

For my part, I bit the bullet for a 7 AM gym session with grinders Rob Waddell and Tony Rae and main trimmer Glenn Ashby.  Now I spend a lot of time in the gym, but the big boys were clearly in a league of their own; as fit as any NFL tight end: 6’4″ and taller, with arms as big around as most guys’ legs, these monsters need not only massive upper body strength, but they need the agility and endurance to bounce across the huge trampoline while the boat bucks through a gybe at 30 knots.  Grinding is almost unending; in the ten minutes I spun the handles with Dalton (also a fitness animal, BTW), our longest spell with no grinding was 40 seconds.  Glenn was much closer to me in strength despite being about 2 feet shorter than me, but despite his less strength-intense job aboard, he spends as much time in the gym as anyone; yet another reason he is so strongly respected by his teammates.

Shots thanks to ETNZ media master Hamish Hooper, who’s also working on the video edits.  For Hoops’ help and the team’s incredibly welcoming and opening attitude toward SA and the Anarchists, we give serious thanks.

 

March 13th, 2013

Article Separator

From the Islands Race tragedy comes two new pieces of info; first, Uncontrollable Urge crew Craig Williams leaves behind a wife, a young daughter and one “on the way”.  While we respect the crew’s privacy and await more information from both the crew and the Medical Examiners’ office, that’s no reason to hold off on donating some money to the family of a lost brother.  Williams was young, full of life, and had everything to live for; let’s give his widow and kids something to live for too. So please, hit this link and dig DEEP! 

UPDATE: Celebration of Life Honoring Craig Williams

Family, Friends, Colleagues, and Sailors, We invite you to join us this Friday March 15, 2013 from 3:30pm to 7pm at San Diego Yacht Club, 1011 Anchorage Lane, San Diego, California 92106. This will be a celebration of a life that was lived fully but cut way too short. Come tell a story, raise a glass, tell a joke and remember the good times we had.

Second, Mile High Klub crew Chris Winnard added some more detail to the Mile High Klub report from the same nasty race.  Be sure to check the full thread for the full story and read on for Snapper’s report.

We were all aware of the weather reports for the weekend and knew we were in for a breezy race. We had a lot of discussion regarding what headsail to fly at the start and the wind dropped considerable so we went with the med Jib, good for 10-16 apparent.

As we milled around the start area we saw that UU had a reef in and were clearly thinking about bigger breeze. We jumped the fleet at the start on port and lead out choosing to exit through the middle gate since the breeze looked batter outside. This was a mistake as the wind went right and allowed the Ben 36.7 to cross us as we met at the last gate.

After a few tacks heading up to the point we got to the point where we wanted to tack to go across and had the 36.7 behind us and UU well to leeward. As we headed across UU tacked up once but went back as they were well behind and held a low line to Catalina. So low we were joking about them taking the island to starboard.

With the wind going right we maintained a high line shearing well away from the 36.7 and figured UU was about three miles to leeward and abeam as we started to tack around the island surrounded by the sleds and a couple of J-120’s. Winds were in the mid to high teens for the most part and not too bad. Our big worry at this point was Pete Hambrick’s back injury and Payson and I discussed whether we should head down to the Isthmus and get him seen to. In hindsight this would of course been the best call!

After almost getting rear ended by Alchemy we tacked and got around the island and headed for San Clemente in a building breeze. Within a few miles we were getting into some serious conditions – winds in the 20’s now but very large and unpredictable seas. It took two hands on the tiller extension working the boat through the waves with large sneaker waves crashing into us from the side. This was a very rough stretch and not great for the FT if we were hoping for a decent overall placing. However, half way to SC I didn’t care about anything other than just finishing and hoping the wind would drop – it didn’t…

We kept the boat on the ragged edge jib reaching with speeds up to 18 knots with J-120’s around us from what we could see. When we got to the bottom of the island we jibed in and tried to work the best vmg we could with the jib. The wind dropped enough for us to decide to fly the spinnaker since we needed to soak to course. Up it went and a combination of too much weight forward and a big swell rounded us up.

I believe the rudder got damaged when we wiped out with the spinnaker. The waves had been causing us problems trying to control the boat and I couldn’t imagine the sheer loads during this wipe out but it still held for several hours. It was when we were switching helm that it broke. Payson had handed off the helm and we hit a big wave that started to round us up. I tried to get the bow down but found myself in the water with the boat on its side. I grabbed the stern pulpit and got back on the boat. Had I been separated from the boat I would not be typing this as the boat started spinning in circles out of control.

The crew of MHK all kept calm and we dealt with all the issues and the coast guard were truly amazing. The one thing that disappointed me was when I got on ch 16 and issued the distress call there were four boats in our area. No reply. I even alerted Islands Race boats of our status and for the boats in our area to look for a boat going in circles (we had sails down at this point).We waved flashlights at two boats and no one apparently saw us even though one was heading right towards us at one point. If conditions are that bad all boats should be monitoring 16 – period.
The worst part of the night was the waterspout sighting and getting everyone down below as we watched it approach then pass by us. I’m not sure what to do if you get over run by a waterspout but figured the best place was to stay in the boat!

Ultimately the Coast Guard came out to us and dispatched their RIB team with medic who jumped on and evaluated Pete. He was deemed not in a life threatening state and was given some happy pills and a warm blanket. The crew from the cutter ‘Steadfast’ were awesome and we coordinated a plan to get to SD. The CG had a smaller 45’ boat sent from SD and we had enough phone signal to get hold of other FT owners and SWYC folks to coordinate bringing a replacement rudder out to us.

The smaller CG boat came out and began towing us but it went as well as we expected, yawing back and forth violently to the point of near whiplash. They finally stopped and threw us a drogue, which we were beginning to deploy when our friends met up with us, rudder in hand. They got the parts to the CG who then floated them over to us. Within 20 minutes we had the motor on and heading to Point Loma.

Lessons learned…? I think if we had two drogues on board we could have sailed the boat back. Drogues and an emergency rudder would also have been the call. The conditions exceeded what we were expecting but the boat held together fine and we can learn from this experience.
Our thoughts and prayers go out to Craig’s family and let’s have the power of SA help his family out in this difficult time.

-Chris W

March 13th, 2013

Article Separator

Big Pimpin’

The Tan 66 gets “launched” at the Dubai boat show. An interesting looking new VPLP-designed catamaran with a world of possibilities. Check it out.

March 13th, 2013

Article Separator

The Kiwi/Brit couple who abandoned their 40′ cruiser after a nasty rollover back in November ain’t happy.  Neither is their boat – though no one expected it to sail itself over a thousand miles from near Tonga to a beach near Coffs, Australia — with the companionway hatch open.  Owner Tania Davies is appealing to locals to return her personal belongings after the yacht was stripped bare just hours after hitting the bricks; the seamanship debate continues to burn over in the Cruising Anarchy thread, while you can see video of the New South Wales police chopper boarding the beached boat here, and an ABC Australia piece on the ‘salvage’ here.  Don’t get this story’s title?  Then this is a must-see.  Photo from NSW PolAir Facebook pagef.

March 13th, 2013

uk banner ad 3 15

swing keel ad.jpg_sml

nosa banner 12 18

FSS_SA

fast sailing banner 2

hh banner purple

latis banner  2 15

fisheries 12 1

melges banner 10 14

rbs banner ad

sail racer 3 15

ullman banner ad 2 15

boat tent banner ad

ewol banner ad

whitecap fp ad

ropeye banner 3 25

fisheries banner 9 4

Gunboat 60 sailing in Annapolis, MD.

http://www.camet.com/

infiniti vanner ad 12 14

race q banner ad

http://www.lymanmorse.com

a 40 banner ad

helly 10 9 side banner

BBY_SA

pyi banner ad

bmc_ad

http://www.crowleys.com/

fireball banner ad

columbia banner 2 15

weta banner 2 9

seascape banner

karver ad 1 14

west system fp banner ad 1 15

sapphire 27

photo boat banner ad

lemon and line

velocitek banner 12 16

schwab tower ad 1 15

rapido banner 2 red

http://www.mauriprosailing.com/

vela banner 2 15

farr 280 banner 9 4

http://www.shaw650.com/

c tech 9 22

hh banner green

http://www.dryuv.com