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Archive for the ‘video’ Category

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James Cameron’s stupidly-named Deepsea Challenge 3D movie comes out today across the US, and while it hasn’t garnered the best reviews, we suspect that water people like us will probably like it just fine.  The world’s most successful movie maker is certainly impressive man and he spent some serious coin to fulfill a lifelong dream, and whether his pet project’s film makes any money at all (or whether it is anything more than a shallow vanity project) is besides the point for us.  We just want to get a little irie, have a tub of popcorn, and see the bottom of the ocean in huge, glorious 3D with an ear-splitting soundtrack.  And not just because advertiser McConaghy Boats built Cameron’s record-breaking sub, either!

 

August 8th, 2014 by admin

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Gary Green’s Bennie 44.7 Green Dragon 2 takes a bite out of Jerry Finnegan’s Cal 40 Celebrity during the Santa Barbara to King Harbor Race.  Grab some popcorn and enjoy.  Then talk shit.   Thanks to ‘Par Avion’ for the find.

 

August 6th, 2014 by admin

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It’s another installment of Video Anarchy, brought to you by our foiling friends at The Great Cup.

Vamos A La Playa

As US772 told you last week in his report from the Dirtboat Worlds, Nevada’s stark desert is one of the most visually impressive places to sail imaginable, and the unique piece of American geography provides a gorgeous backdrop to this video showing just what landsailing is all about.  Shots of the Smith Creek Playa are best in HD on a big screen, and hit this link for some drone aerials during one of the event’s crazy dust storms.  And if you want a look at just how scary Latino music was in 1983 (and the inspiration for the title), hit this link.

RORC To The Rescue

Yeah, there are a lot of idiotic looking blazers.  And yeah, maybe the pole-back, supper-table IRC boats are the antithesis of what Sailing Anarchy is all about.  But we’re stoked to see an American with the quickest boat in the fleet help Team Ireland crush the rest of Europe, and we’re even more glad to see historical events like the Comedy Cup saved from extinction.   With their biggest fleet in a while, it looks like the RORC is on the right track…check out more here.

Skidmarks

While Team Oracle’s management continues to make the team, the country, and the sport look shady, the actual sailors seem to be having a blast.  Have a look at this hilarious short from OTUSA racers during their Moth Camp in Lake Macquarie about a naked Jimmy Spithill’s hygiene during his Sports Illustrated photo shoot.  Thread here, and a slightly more serious Oracle moth training video here.

Back Then, Again

Your wildly approving clicks and comments from the ’83 SORC inspired us to give you more, and thanks to the Aussie RB Sailing Blog, we’ve got it.   The hour-long video comes from the 1982 Hawaii Clipper Cup, and includes not only the historic Americans like Kialoa, but also the big Aussie names in SORC racing.  Enjoy it, and get over to the Video SORC thread to chat with other old bastards who remember it, too.  Big thanks to original SA’er “SPORTSCAR” for the heads-up.

Ashes To Ashes

Some odd decisions and shitty conditions meant that, despite the 2014 Moth Worlds pulling in the biggest fleet in the Class’s history, the event went by somewhat unnoticed by the larger yachting community. We just couldn’t get excited by the two-fleet format, racing peppered with abandonments and postponements and sail measurement issues, or the fact that, with the ’13 World Champ, the majority of the expected ‘AC Mothies’, and nearly every US sailor opting to blow off a trip to the UK South Coast, the competition wasn’t really what we’ve become used to.

Add to that the organizers’ total fuckup with the media; they chose to use a UK sailing publication for all of their media work – something we normally applaud because it usually means good, professional content.  But in this case, that sailing publication branded everything from the Moth Worlds with their own magazine’s logo, virtually guaranteeing the majority of the sailing media would ignore it.  It may be petty, but it’s also the basic common sense: If you depend on the media to maximize exposure for the health of your class and the satisfaction of your sponsors, it’s a good idea not to ostracize them with an exclusive publication partner – unless your media partner is bigger than everyone else, or writes you a huge check…neither of which happened last week in Hayling Island.

Fortunately, the English got their hands handed to them both by Nathan Outteridge, who wins his second Moth World title, and by the Aussies, who took the all-important Ashes trophy in the team competition between Ol’ Blighty and Oz.

We congratulate Nathan, and above is a look at what the Ashes is all about from Beau Outteridge.  And mark your calendars for early 2015, when a massive fleet, including many of the names who sat out the ’14 event, will descend on Sorrento, Australia to battle for perhaps the most important title in performance dinghy sailing.

 

July 30th, 2014 by admin

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As the second Mac gets set to begin tomorrow, Our old pal Petey Crawford jammed together a video from the light air/downwind start of the earlier race, Bayview’s Port Huron-Mackinac.  Bora Gulari returned from Sardinia for a couple weeks to give Phil and Sharon O’Niel’s TP52 Natalie J her fourth straight overall (Cove Island Course) BYC-Mack win, and we’ve got an interview coming up with the rock star soon…for now, enjoy the stylings from Penalty Box.

UPDATE: Tim Lewin asked us to point out that, while Natalie J won four straight Cove Island overalls that she sailed, she actually didn’t go macking in 2013 because she was on the Transpac.  Last year, Sledgehammer, a J/120 won the Overall for Cove Island.   

July 18th, 2014 by admin

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On July 6th, the Tassie yacht Alive smashed the record for the 1885 nautical mile ocean race across the South Pacific from Melbourne to Port Vila, the port capital of the tropical islands of Vanuatu.  Here’s what it looked like.
 

July 17th, 2014 by admin

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We love to get nerdy, and few can get nerdier than former Air Force Lt. Col., Boeing military aerospace engineer, Oracle Racing designer, and Sailing Anarchist Tom Speer.  This guy has been foiling since Egyptian Cotton sails – that’s why we can excuse the crappy sound and image quality from The Foiling Week’s video of Speer’s talk on the state-of-the-art in foiling, just last week.  It’s embedded above, and here’s the companion PDF to Speer’s talk.

 

July 15th, 2014 by admin

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With no one dying, no boats breaking of late, and nothing really special in their media output, we can be forgiven for forgetting the pay-as-you-go Clipper Race has been ‘raging’ for months, and as we speak, beginning its final points scoring leg.  Sir Robin’s pay-as-you-go crew are quietly getting their work done, training newbies whilst racing ’round the world on their heavy 70′ racer/cruisers.  The boat’s size and stability are two reasons we were a bit shocked by this knockdown-plus video from two days ago.

Very, very few sailors will ever find themselves actually inside a waterspout, and a huge thanks to Team GBR for sharing it with all of us.  Show up tomorrow (the 12th) in St. Katherine’s to check out the fleet.

 

July 11th, 2014 by admin

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If you ask people why they make a life or career out of sailing, you’ll get a host of answers.  Rather than doing that, just watch this video.  It’s not important who made it or why; just watch it for what it is – a great example of why we do it.  And if you must know where this video comes from, go here - but don’t say we didn’t warn you.

 

July 10th, 2014 by admin

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New York Angels founder Brian Cohen has made his mark on the business world by investing in over 200 disruptive start-up companies, though he is perhaps best known for being the original investor in Pinterest. So when it came time for Cohen to replace his Swan, the investment legend knew it was time for something a little more… disruptive.  Even Anarchist.  Very little in today’s sailing market intrigued Brian until he discovered Gunboat, and the excellent new Gunboat 55.  We rarely publish gushing reports, but given the stature of this author and our love for all things Gunboat, we thought we’d share some glowing positive sentiments from a happy new boat owner. And to Brian: Keep disrupting, bro.  And for you grommets who don’t know what we’re referring to in the title of this piece, get educated, and don’t forget to watch the video below Brian’s thoughts.

My life has always involved technology disrupters. Little wonder that meant my sailing life would also be disrupted by the extraordinary vision of Peter Johnstone and my new Gunboat family of 100 artisan boat builders in North Carolina. From the moment RAINMAKER left the dock in Wanchese, headed for NYC, I knew my life would never be the same. Being the honored owner of the very first GUNBOAT 55 comes with the great responsibility of sharing its luxury, speed and grace with whomever I could. The sailing world has forever changed!

Screen Shot 2014-07-09 at 11.30.28 AMOn Father’s Day I took the first sail with my family on Long Island Sound and anchored in Huntington Harbor. If a sailing experience can be magical, this one was, and we all shared it together. We toasted the moment and then took turns at the wheel, sailing past every one, countless wide-eyed faces trying to figure out just exactly what it was that they were seeing.

On board we shared the exhilaration as RAINMAKER’s speed dramatically accelerated, 12 knots, 13 knots, 14 knots, and screamed in harmony as she hit her stride at 18 knots. Screams gave way to giggles, everyone thoroughly enjoying the rush of fear and excitement of such an unknown experience. The boat’s ease of use and power have created a new level of quality and performance expectation in the sailing universe.

My urge to sail RAINMAKER is very intense. I live in the West Village and have reserved a slip just 15 minutes away via the PATH train at the beautiful Newport Marina. Against the backdrop of the Manhattan skyline, and amongst the many 100’+ motor yachts, RAINMAKER’s sailing power and luxury feel right at home.

We are fortunate to have the young but very experienced chief Gunboat skipper Chris Bailet onboard, who is quickly connecting with RAINMAKER’s mind, as I become its soul. This past weekend with winds nearing 25 knots, we seamlessly climbed through speeds in the high teens and into the twenties, eventually flying faster than the wind!

I’m looking forward to getting RAINMAKER out on the racing circuit as soon as possible, our first test being the ALIR in late July, a race I won in 2002 aboard my Swan 40. If our early experiences are an indication of our potential, RAINMAKER will become a regular sight on the race course.

In the meantime, we’ll be enjoying evening and weekend sails on the Hudson. If you happen to be in the New York Harbor, please come by and say hello.

-Brian

 

 

July 9th, 2014 by admin

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We wonder if maybe folks should spend a little less time irritating the gods of the sea?  Check out this clip (and see the original here) of racing in the Transquadra aboard an Archambault 31, with subtitles from our own Mr. Clean.  The boat’s name?  The White Whale.

And how about this one for a bit more whale fuck you?

 

July 7th, 2014 by admin

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As the summer season kicks into full swing, so do the cameras, and man, have we got a lot of video for you to check out this week!

Modern Classic

The sexy Arbor 26, a wooden performance yacht, designed by Simon Rodgers. We like!

 

Game Changers 

On the VOR front, We are warming up rapidly to the Franco-Swiss-Sino Team Dongfeng vibe. For the first time in modern memory, a major race entry from a nontraditional sailing nation (though China would argue that one) has more than one or two crew from the home nation, and in fact Wolf, Leo, Horace and Kit epitomize the Wechat/Facebook generation of young Chinese. They’re incredible ambassadors, capable of blowing away a lot of stereotypes, and if the team can do decently well, they will undoubtedly have hundreds of millions of rabid fans. And with four Chinese under 30 aboard, their power and speed might just make up for a lot of experience, especially with a couple of Groupama 70 vets, several Figaro masters, and even some RTW multihull record holders aboard.

Will they win? We have no idea, and we don’t think it likely. Might they finally nail that holy grail that the VOR, WMRT, America’s Cup, and every other sailing series has failed miserably at over the past decade – the fan-ization and opening up of sailing to the world’s largest population? They have the best chance yet. Another great piece of work from Sam Greenfield – if you only watch one of these, watch this one.

Night Moves

Here’s something you don’t see every day: A nighttime delivery of the ETNZ Extreme 40 through the heart of St. Petersburg in advance of the first-ever ESS in Mother Russia.  Blair Tuke helmed ETNZ to the final podium spot (with Glenn Ashby replaced by Ray Davies, while Gash was off winning his 4,000th A-Cat Worlds),  just ahead of Big Ben and Pals, while the sole American at the event, Morgan Larson, continued to show his skills off, beating two-time ESS champion Leigh Macmillian again and cementing Alinghi’s lead over the fleet.  The racing on the final day was some of the most bizarre we’ve seen; legs of less than a quarter mile – about a minute – with breeze to 20 knots made things well worth watching.  Is it similar to your racing? Probably not. But it ain’t bad. Watch thefinal day of racing at this link.

The Big One

2014′s biggest event for ultra-performane sailing happens in just a couple of weeks, and with nearly 130 Moths registered for the Hayling Island Moth Worlds, there’s plenty of spectating ahead in what will undoubtedly be the biggest Moth World Championship in the 80+ year history of the class.  Current World Champ Bora Gulari has been tight-lipped about whether he can get away from the drawing board at Luna Rossa Challenge and still hasn’t registered for the event, though LR stablemate Chris Draper is on the list, and should be a factor if the South Coast breeze is off.   And with the emergence of the Exocet Moth as a very quick alternative to the long-dominant Mach 2, we may yet see someone fast enough to beat Nathan Outerridge, the cream of the current Mach 2 crop.   A nice promo from Beau “Bangin The Corner” Outerridge is above; the smack talking is over here.

Big Ben’s Neighborhood 

As exciting as it is to see China’s possibilities in the biggest crewed offshore race in the world, it’s just as cool that Ben Ainslie is leading the UK back to the America’s Cup.  No nation has a more important history with the AC, no nation cares more about its yacht racing, and if you’re looking for rabid, knowledgable fans and a great pool of national sailing resources, Britain is the place for it.  We’re stoked for Ben, stoked for his team, and stoked for Portsmouth, which announced around US$ 13 Million in funding and a site plan approval for Ben’s ambitious new America’s Cup base.  Here’s a quick animation of how it’ll look; hit the announcement for all the details (and chat about Team UK in the thread here.)

Morning Wood

What’s prettier than a perfectly restored wooden boat?  Not much.  This slideshow comes from last weekend’s Master Mariners Wooden Boat Show at Corithian YC in Tiburon, California this past weekend. Thanks to Anarchist Black Jack for the tip, and there’s a thread here.

Commonly Uncommon

Anyone who’s done a few ocean miles has come into contact with a big ship offshore; a usually quite cool and occasionally terrifying experience.  In this video, Ian Walker’s Abu Dhabi team gets buzzed by a yachting captain aboard the Queen Mary 2 in the middle of the Atlantic.  Bonus fact: Walker’s great-grandfather was a tugboat captain for the original Queen Mary.

 

 

July 2nd, 2014 by admin

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June is always something of a ‘call of the wild’ for powerboaters, when a long winter, out-of-practice boaters, a rush to get boats in the water, and overworked, underskilled boatyard staff all combine to create a perfect storm of stupidity.  Here are a few of the results of that storm, from the past month:

Overstimulated

Insane conspiracy theorist and drunken wannabe yachtie Richard Rodriguez made off with Newport Beach’s 80-foot gin palace Stimulus over the weekend; a crime that may have succeeded had Rodriguez known how to drive a boat, known how to NOT call the Coast Guard on the radio, or known how to NOT get shitfaced on galley rum during a crime.   This one is a crackup.

The Wrong Kind Of Threesome

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60 year old party girl Mary Ann Belson was apparently looking for double points last week when she accompanied local fishermen Craig Gallo and James Benenato onto Gallo’s 26-foot fishing boat after some drinking at a local bar.  After leaving the dock, the threesome quickly got down and dirty while the boat was left to its own devices, running smack into a LaGuardia Airport runway approach light and impaling itself on a piling.  Unsurprisingly, the same incompetent Port Authority that missed a jet-skiier crashing his ride and climbing across the runways and into the JFK terminal in 2012 and a tranvestite hooker climbing a fence and strolling into Newark Airport last year missed this one, too – despite having a small armada of police boats tied up seconds from the menage à morons, the Port Authority couldn’t actually operate them at night…Chat about it all here.

Scenic Lookout

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Less funny but quite a bit more spectacular than the previous two is this drone footage from Chula Vista (San Diego), where the 110-foot, $17M Polar Bear did its best impression of a convicted Salem Witch earlier this month.  Yachts catching fire ain’t unusual, but seeing it up close sure is, and thanks to the San Diego 6 news crew, we got that.  The cause of the fire is under investigation.  Click the pic to get to the outside video link.

Vasa Matter?

The Swedish Navy’s will never live down the hubris-borne loss of the Vasa in the 17th century, but at least someone finally came up with a stupider, more top-heavy boat; check out the launch of the 90 foot long, $10M Baden in Anacortes, WA last month.  We’ve been too wrapped up in hours of reading the hilarious thread to post earlier, but on a powerboat day, we couldn’t resist.  Seriously, sit back and read that thread for a laugh or ten.

 

June 30th, 2014 by admin

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Willie McBride and Dane Wilson were born to the sea; two quintessential California watermen with a long, long sailing future ahead of them.  Will that future begin in Rio?  Only time will tell, but we love the fact that these young studs are already pushing the limits with their training and their organization.  More from Willie below, and have a look at their good-looking website and donate to their cause here.

For those of you not currently following the daily tweets and posts of your favorite Olympic hopefuls or don’t live in Long Beach, CA, the traveling circus that is currently masquerading as the US Sailing Team arrived nearly unannounced in May at Alamitos Bay Yacht Club, and immediately began setting up camp to take advantage of the clockwork-like sea breeze and messy seas west of the LA Harbor breakwater.

For Dane and me, this was the first chance to train shoulder to shoulder with the other 49er teams vying for a spot on the 2016 Olympic Team. We’re relatively new to the fray, having only been sailing the 49er for the past 10 months, but opportunity knocked, so we packed up our gear and abandoned our daily training grind in Santa Barbara to see where we fit in the fleet.

Day one was a bit jittery for us, as the other teams hoisted their sails plastered with sponsor logos, Olympic rings, and gigantic US flags. We were sporting an old set of Canadian sails. No matter – never judge a book by its cover – off we went. The agenda for the day was to speed test upwind until we ran out of runway, then turn around and send it downwind, best man wins. Somewhat to our surprise we hung in with the “senior class,” so much so that by the end of the session Luther and Fuzz awarded us the title of “greatest rookie team of all time.” We weren’t entirely sure if they were encouraging us or hazing us. Either way, day one was under our belt and all was well.

The highlight of the month was the private coaching bestowed upon us by the famed McKee brothers – legends to any high-speed sailor on the West Coast. We’d been staying on the water after the group sessions each afternoon to solidify the day’s lessons, and one afternoon Charlie and Jonathan stayed out to chase us around in a coach boat, with Charlie analyzing our crew work and Jonathan critiquing driving techniques. We made several changes that smoothed out a lot of the boat handling and helped with the rudderless aspects of our maneuvers. We were stoked to get the attention and hopefully to put it all to good use. Part of that process was sharing debriefs each night with longtime supporter and mentor Howie Hamlin. Howie was gracious enough (as always) to provide a roof over our heads while we were staying in Long Beach, and served up heaping bowls of ice cream each evening as we mused over the daily sessions, discussing tuning techniques unique to skiffs, boat handling nuances, and even the means by which we can collaborate more effectively in order to leap frog the US skiff talent in general, as he has always encouraged us to do in the 29er fleet. If that weren’t enough, he even volunteered to ferry around our buddy, and epic young gun photographer John Kelsey in his ridiculously cool helicopter to shoot some aerial stills and video. The footage in this video is just a snippet from our time in Long Beach. Expect to see a lot more from John in the near future as we’re collaborating on a movie about our collective love of the ocean.

In the end, it was an intense month of learning. We’ve now been training for nearly a year in the 49er and by far our biggest challenge has been getting good, consistent information and data to help us progress. It would be incredibly helpful if there were easily accessible institutional knowledge available for young teams here in the US, but unfortunately that knowledge base doesn’t exist yet. In our own program we’ve been compiling, tracking and archiving all of our training sessions, lessons learned, testing procedures and Ah Ha! moments throughout our campaign. It’s a bit of a mish mash of data at this point, but in time we hope to establish a baseline of open information that will be available to new teams getting started on the Olympic skiff path. Anyone willing, able, or interested in helping out can peruse our extended mission at www.FromWhenceWeCame.org.

Big thanks to Trevor Moore for letting us use the American flag sail for the video and to all who made it a great month of training: Leandro, Luther, the McKees, Oakcliff, ABYC, and of course Sailing Anarchy for always highlighting young teams like ours.

-Willie

 

June 27th, 2014 by admin

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Newport is one of the world’s most iconic sailing destinations, and last month’s 11th Hour Racing Cup on Narragansett Bay was something of an introduction of the Class to a place filled with the world’s top sailors.  Scheduling issues and light air turned a potentially amazing regatta into a bit of an exhibition, but who better to make it all look great than the awesome Onne Van Der Wal?  Here’s his 3-minute HD wrap of the action.

 

June 25th, 2014 by admin

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Dead calms meant lots of swimming and fishing on the big MN lake yesterday, with 29-year old Vince Porter (Melges 24 World Champ Brian’s nephew) holding the A-Scow US National Championship lead after two races.  Racing begins at 10 AM central for all the marbles today, with Clean and the team streaming it all live.  Check it out above, and go here for the results after two.

 

June 22nd, 2014 by admin

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As always, Ryan Breymaier is as honest and refreshing as they come, and as the first American to win an IMOCA event in a long time, he’s got plenty to say.  About his race and NYC’s sendoff (and what NYTimes’ Chris Museler has on his plate after crossing with Ryan), about big moves in the Open 60 fleet, about the soon-approaching Barcelona Race, and why he’ll be in Marine City, MI for a while this summer.  A half hour with Mr. Clean for the SA Innerview.

 

June 18th, 2014 by admin

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Ben Moon’s late charge wasn’t enough to hold off the speed of Bruce Mahoney’s DNA cat with T-foil Exploder rudders at the biggest A-Cat North Americans in history; Mahoney becomes the champ of the first-ever event held at SailNC in the Outer Banks, and we expect it to be the first of many.  Here’s a quick look thanks to the Rachel and Richard show; we’ll have a bit more about the current state of A-Class racing later in the week.

 

June 16th, 2014 by admin

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Ben Moon takes the lead on a very breezy Friday at the A-Cat NAs. Check it.

 

June 14th, 2014 by admin

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With racing abandoned on day 2 of the A-Cat NAs, Houston cat racer Bruce Mahoney took the chance to trial his brand new flying J/boards in 12 knots of breeze and a beautiful evening in the OBX.  Here’s the interview and Bruce’s explanation, along with a look at what a stable 18-20 knot ride looks like on an A-Class.

 

June 13th, 2014 by admin

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AY7Q8121While its international appeal is fairly diverse, the American A-Cat Class has long been regarded as the province of athletic but greying sailors, so it’s surprising that we’ve got not one but two teenagers racing their own boats at the A-Class NAs in the OBX.  Here’s a Rachel Jesperson/OceanImages look at the excellent Jeremy Herrin, who nailed a second place yesterday sailing an A-Cat he built himself in his Sarasota, FL garage with his dad.

Here’s the Day 1 Highlight Video with a short chat from Jeremy; three more days of sailing are ahead with Bruce Mahoney leading the fleet after two light air races.

 

June 12th, 2014 by admin

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