BBY_SA

sail fast banner ad 6 10

torqeedo small ad

http://www.mauriprosailing.com/

c c 30 banner 6 17

karver ad 1 14

http://www.dryuv.com

mx ad

yellow banner

http://www.quantumsails.com/

farr 280 banner ad

schwab tall banner ad

pyi banner ad

ner 2

http://www.shaw650.com/

sound ad 4 23

http://www.crowleys.com/

landfall generic.

west marine 160 x 250 ad 6 10

gmt banner ad

weta banner 2 9

http://www.lymanmorse.com

http://www.westmarine.com/timers/ronstan--clearstart-sailing-watch-black-red--15213648?cm_mmc=DS-_-Sailinganarchy-_-RonstanWatch-_-160x160Blue/

seascape banner

anchor new ad

uk ad 4 3

Gunboat 60 sailing in Annapolis, MD.

FSS_SA

predict wind banner ad

fisheries side ad 7 22

http://www.camet.com/

toro 34 banner ad

rbs banner ad

ropeye banner 3 25

ullman banner 7 24

http://www.motivetrimarans.com/

cci banner ad

boyd banner ad

mcconaghy top banner 12 12

Gunboat 60 sailing in Annapolis, MD.

VX-One-550x150-Bnr_V3

torqeedo top banner

tan 55 banner ad 1 21

mauri 3 1 SA-Top-Rotate

b g banner ad

Article Separator

sa plate

So go out to your garage and take that crappy car dealer-issued license plate frame off your mini van and replace it with this: The brand new Sailing Anarchy license plate frame. Black, plastic and awesome. Ya gotta have one for every vehicle! A mere $15.00 delivered to your door in the USA. $22.00 anywhere else. Do it!

Check out our new store page while you are at it.

 

July 29th, 2014

Article Separator

Most of you know – boy, do you – that we are being sued for defamation by Daniel Meyers, he of the First Marblehead Corp. It seems we are somehow being painted as the bad guys. Really?

Angela Smith, a mother from Chesapeake, Va., filed a petition on Change.org several years ago asking private loan provider First Marblehead Corp. to forgive the $40,000 in student loans that her husband had co-signed for their son Donte, who was shot to death in 2008.

“Shortly after Donte died, that’s when the collection calls started. It was like a punch in the gut — we didn’t know what hit us,” Smith wrote in the petition. “All of a sudden we not only had to deal with the police and attorneys investigating his murder, but we also had to deal with collectors constantly calling and reminding us of our son’s death in the worst way.”

The petition received more than 150,000 signatures from sympathizers but no action from the lenders. First Marblehead didn’t respond to a request for comment, and Smith says the loan was recently sold to another company. The full story can be found here.

 

July 29th, 2014

Article Separator

Pardon this unreal walk down video-memory lane. Those of us old enough to remember will find it amazing. Those of you who aren’t will also find it amazing, but probably not for the same reasons as the old bastards!  Jump in the thread here! Props to Mike Jones for the title inspiration.

 

July 28th, 2014

Article Separator

ok 1

Race Report

The OK Dinghy European title is heading back to the class homeland after Jørgen Svendsen of Denmark took the championship following six races on Steinhuder Meer in Germany in a huge fleet of 110 boats last week.

Denmark’s Bo Petersen was the defending champion, but he could only finish third behind the host country’s Andre Budzien, and Svendsen. It is perhaps no coincidence that Denmark is the fastest growing national fleet in the class with a spectacular resurgence of interest in the past five years. This has been spurred recently with the introduction of a new state of the art hull builder in Denmark which filled four places in the top 10 including second and third.

A former world no 1 Jorgen Svendsen took the Championship with a three point margin over some of the best OK Dinghy sailors in the world. He out-sailed the 109 other sailors in the largest ever European championship in the class and only ever slipped up once while winning four out of the six races sailed. In one of those he was beaten by was his own son Frederik, sailing at his first ever major OK Dinghy event.

Despite the fleet being unable to sail the final two days due to light winds, the six that were completed tested all aspects of the skill, character and perseverance of the sailors. The shifts were many and often immense, and the pressure differences over the lake were taxing. The first two days challenged the brain with multiple combinations of shift patterns littered across the course area like confetti. The third day tested endurance with winds of up to 26 knots and no less shifty. It was a complete championship in more ways than one.

In his acceptance speech Svendsen paid tribute to the other competitors. Citing many examples of good sportsmanship, hilarity, and intense competition during the week, he commended the fleet on a well fought and gentlemanly compeition. Even though he never raced against the defending champion Petersen, as the racing was in split fleets, Svendsen had mastered the conditions better than any other sailor and was a deserving winner.

But in an event of this nature, all the sailors were winners. It was an event unlike any other with all the stops pulls and all sailors receiving more than one prize. It was organised with an ambition to set a standard that couldn’t be beaten and that goal was achieved in spectacular style. The attention to detail in everything was bordering on the obsessive, the surprises were never ending, the friendly banter and camaraderie among the sailors provided an electric atmosphere of fun, joviality and shared enthusiasm for a great class. The racing, as ever, was great fun and the sailors loved every second of it. Results here. Photo by Ania Pawlaczyk.

- Robert Deaves.

 

July 28th, 2014

Article Separator

bolt 5

Big Pimpin’

Finally something new and cool is coming to San Diego. Bolt 37 hull #5 should be arriving this Fall to owner Andy Rasdale. The boat should be a rocket and it will be fun to see how it goes. Add a kelp cutter, a few good sailors and the thing ought to go like hell and be  a blast to sail.

Let’s hope the local yokels on the PHRF board don’t display their usual incompetence, self-preservation, and ignorance to go out of their way to fuck yet another new sporty…

 

July 28th, 2014

Article Separator

we love etchells

And always have. Well, that is if always means right now.  From the Etchells Invitational Cup in the UK thanks to Rupert Holmes.

 

July 28th, 2014

Article Separator

AC Dope

We thought this would be a funny bit of replay

Hi! I’d like to invite you to join my contest. It’s a sort of a race. Ready… set… go! Oh. You want some rules? Hang on. We’ll get to that. I’m winning already. Pardon? You say you need rules to decide whether or not to play? No you don’t. You just need to trust me.

It’s a fancy race. Does that help? You still need more info? It has driven men to obsession, and some might even say, murder. Now do you want to play? You do? Great. Sign here.

Entree fee? Of course, that’s where the contest really shines. You commit to paying more than you have, and then I raise the price. Sounds good? I knew you’d say yes. Wait. Pardon? When is it? That’s on a need to know basis. You don’t. See you there, then!

One more thing. People have been dedicating their lives to this contest for over a hundred years. You cast yourself into illustrious company just by saying you would like to know more. Congratulations. – Kevin Hall.

 

July 28th, 2014

Article Separator

Screen Shot 2014-07-28 at 12.14.00 PMAfter the ass-kissing statement of support released last week by the ‘Euro 4′ AC35 challenger heads (Ainslie, Sirena, Percy, Cammas), we’re unsurprised to learn that, according to AC authority and AP writer Bernie Wilson, Russell Coutts specifically told ETNZ to stay home from a major, confidential Challenger/Defender summit meeting later this week in London.

According to Wilson’s piece, “the event authority is working with the teams “to further define an event based on the published protocol.” Coutts said that after he heard from another team [emphasis ours -ed] the Kiwis didn’t want to want to proceed on that basis, “I rang them up and said, ‘It’s best that you not come.’ We have four other challenging teams and the defender that want to work together to have a great event this time and in the future.”

We’re not quite sure what Coutts’ offered to get formerly logical and critical guys like Sirena on board with whatever failure-doomed plan Coutts is trying, now that his greed and hubris sent Iain Murray and Team Australia into the void previously occupied by Vincenzo Onorato.  Discounted entry fees?  Access to some of OTUSA’s old data archives? It’s gotta be something, because they all know that Russell Coutts and Larry Ellison are currently regarded as the biggest buffoons in international sport.

Coutts’ latest bit of nastiness to his countrymen is just one more folly from a guy who is almost comically bad at the business of sport, and the same question is on every AC watcher in the world’s lips:  Why would one of the world’s best businessmen keep Russell Coutts at the head of the AC organization when he has failed at every single AC-related business decision he’s ever made, including the most costly boondoggle in the history of modern sport?  It ain’t the biggest newspaper in the world, but the Otago Daily Times has one possible answer: They say Coutts’ contract may have a ‘Bertarelli Clause’, guaranteeing Coutts the top job until he gives it up himself.

Golden Gate Yacht Club members are not happy.  Notwithstanding their recent “support”, Challengers are not happy.  Sponsors are not happy (or nonexistent).  And fans are not happy.  Hell, even Obama has a 40% approval rating.  But how long will the notoriously headstrong Larry Ellison continue to allow his reputation and the sport he loves to be screwed over by a piss-poor businessman who’s proven that he is terrible at everything…except for one skill:  Winning the America’s Cup?

Unless this is all part of the plan…screw everyone and you might not come so close to losing the next one?

Is there anyone in the world left that supports Russell Coutts?

 

July 28th, 2014

Article Separator

supa fly

Pretty bitchin’ looking new Mills designed 62′ with a lifting keel and of course a dinghy garage!

 

July 28th, 2014

Article Separator

SA’s resident Wx expert ‘DryArmour’ checks in with a report on El Nino.  For more, check the thread, and if one of the hundreds of uninformed news reports on the weather phenomenon has you confused, read this primer on the state of the Pacific.

The Eastern and Central Pacific are as active as I can recall over the last 20 years. A generally moist environment is increasing the chance for tropical storm Boiling Pacific July 23, 2014development. Two areas are of particular interest at the moment. One 800 mi SSE of the Bog Island of Hawaii is marginally likely to turn into something that requires watching. The second area is just east 140 degrees west and is already showing some rotation and cloud tops near the center are cold to very cold. Some SW shear is slowing rapid development for the moment. Both systems are moving generally westward @10-15mph. If you live in the Hawaiian Islands or are traveling there in the next week pay attention to the weather and local notifications. The Sea Surface temperatures are also much warmer than the average over the last 20 years and getting warmer and spreading northward.

Read on.

 

July 28th, 2014

Article Separator

DeRidderVOD65As the entire world (or maybe just a few thousand die-hard ocean racing fans on the SA Forums) waits for the identity of the mysterious skipper behind the 7th and final Volvo Ocean Race team, just the other day,  former Mean Machine owner Peter De Ridder got behind the helm of one of the VOD65s and, if you believe the look on his face, had a hell of a time.

If you’re new to this whole game, De Ridder made plenty of noise on the international one-design and box rule circuits, with highly successful and well-oiled Mean Machine Farr 40, Mumm 30, and TP52 campaigns, and a hot pink paint job that you couldn’t miss.  When he announced his VOR campaign and bought a previous generation boat to train on, everyone cheered; it’s not every day an amateur owner/driver steps up to the Volvo.

Alas, the global financial crisis emptied PDR’s petty cash box out quite rapidly, and with no sponsors jumping, he pulled the plug on the Volvo challenge, staying out of the high end of the sport altogether for the past few years.

Yet here he is in Europe, sailing around on a Volvo 65.  Is this the beginning of something new, or is PDR just having a go with a few of his old pals?  Or is De Ridder getting in some practice for his new boat – a Volvo 65 named Mean Machine? We don’t know more – do you?

 

July 28th, 2014

Article Separator

nose job

Metaphorically speaking, of course. this is the new bow on Wild Oats, as compared to the old bow on Wild Oats. We have no idea what it is supposed to do, other than cost money. Thanks to Andrea Francolini for the pic.

 

July 26th, 2014

Article Separator

A bit of PR puffery, but some impressive sailing, without a doubt…

scarlet 1Since crossing the finish line at 02:05:18 HST on Saturday 19 July the crew of Scarlet Runner, have been cautiously celebrating their provisional race results. Although 1st place in their Latitude 38 division looked likely for Robert Date’s Reichel/Pugh 52, it was still possible that pending strong winds could favour the 48 other competitors still to complete their journey from San Francisco to Hawaii.

Last night at the Pacific Cup Presentation Dinner at Kanehoe yacht club, however, Scarlet Runner was officially announced 1st in division, 1st in ORR Overall and winner of the 2014 Pacific Cup. The ‘fun race to Hawaii’ wasn’t without its challenges for the Australian boat, losing 20 miles on day four when a discarded fishing net wrapped around their keel and then blowing out the A4 spinnaker on day seven.

“The closer we got to Hawaii the more it felt like we were in a match race against Roy Disney’s Pyewacket”, said Rob Date. “We certainly could have used those lost 20 miles, but hard reaching and running conditions bring out the best in Scarlet, and the crew really dug deep for the last 48 hours, so we slowly improved our lead and all our hard work and effort has paid off.”

About Scarlet Runner’s Current Campaign

The successful 2070 nautical mile race is the last official engagement of Scarlet Runner’s world journey.

Leaving her home port of Sandringham Yacht Club in Melbourne, Australia on 11 July 2013, Scarlet competed in the Sydney to Gold Coast race then the Brisbane to Keppell yacht race. A quick stop at Airlie Beach arriving in time to compete in the opening day of Airlie Beach Race Week saw her, in full delivery mode, first over the line in her division.

Scarlet then stopped in Cairns, Darwin and Cocos Keeling Islands before leaving Australian waters for Mauritius and Durban on her way to Cape Town where she competed in her first international race in January 2014, The Cape to Rio. A fantastic effort from the crew in very tough conditions resulted in 2nd over the line, 2nd in her division and 2nd IRC Overall to the Italian Volvo 70 Maserati.

The next leg of the journey took Scarlet Runner from Rio de Janeiro to Salvador then onto Fortaleza before leaving Brazil and basing in St. Maarten to compete in the St.Thomas International Regatta, Les Voiles de St. Barth, the Antigua to Guadeloupe race, Around Antigua race and Antigua Race Week.

At the conclusion of the Caribbean campaign, Scarlet sailed through the Panama Canal to Acapulco then onto Cabo San Lucas, San Diego and then arrived in San Francisco for her scheduled start date for the Pacific Cup, coincidentally exactly one year to the day since she left Sandringham, 11 July.

“The hard work involved in all the logistics of this campaign is being rewarded by sailing such a great boat and achieving some great results.” said Boat Captain Brett Averay, who will have sailed all of the approximate 33,000 miles of the journey with Scarlet Runner by the time she returns home.

 

July 26th, 2014

Article Separator

medicaine man

As in Medicine Man, a much modified 63′ Alan Andrews SoCal special cruising along in the so far very light Santa Barbara to King Harbor Race. She rates -99 in PHRF, and owes the sleds time, but that wasn’t a problem for them in this one. Results here.

While we’re at it, here’s the nicest Santa Cruz 50 on the planet, here’s the yellowest Sled on the planet and here’s the nicest Carrera 290 on the planet, all on their way to King Harbor. Photos thanks to Mad Max.

 

July 26th, 2014

Article Separator

6 sophie

Sophie 2. A sophisticated modern 6 Meter. Photo by Snap.

That’s what we were all saying to the wind gods who plagued the 6 Meter Europeans in Falmouth U.K,.this week. The Europeans ended today on a whimper in another dying breeze day and concluded a non event since the required five races was not achieved to establish a series.

Today was the make up day and with fingers crossed we all headed to the boats for the early start time with high hopes for two or possibly three races today. There was no time to grab a breakfast pasty or really bad coffee from Tesco as we had to get out and attack the morning breeze, which sadly did not arrive.

Still, we all headed out to the course and the PRO ultimately sent us on our way in what looked like light but reasonably steady breeze. Unfortunately, the breeze died and while the modern division managed to limp over the line the classics could not overcome the 0-2 knot gusts against a building adverse tide.

On US 83 Llanoria, we match raced a lobster pot for about half an hour and were soundly beaten. At that point we radioed the RC and let them know we were retiring. Other boats anchored for a while and the PRO, Chris Hadden, finally let the classics know that we were done.

Normally – after having three and a half days of being skunked for wind – there would be lots of grumbling, but everyone took it in stride. There was really nothing that could have been done with zero workable wind despite the admirable efforts of the race committee.

I’ve taken a few swipes in my reports and they’ve all been justified, especially calling out certain teams who had support boats that could have helped tow boats in (after being asked to) but chose not to, while others went over the top to help. The 6 meter fleet is chock full of really great people who are enthusiastic, love their boats, and partaking in an event that became a non event did not damper the overall feeling of general camaraderie among the bulk of the competitors.

6 actionThe race committee team really deserve some praise for doing everything possible to get the fleet racing. The British Open had some of the best 6 meter racing I’ve done with nice breeze and good courses. I for one am going to miss the voice of the radio time keeper, whom I nicknamed Davros (the imperial Dalek leader) with his count offs and when he announced ‘one minute to orange’ was eerily reminiscent of ‘orange alert’ from the classic 60′s series The Prisoner. All joking aside, the team on the Buccaneer Charlie and all the mark boats deserve a big hand and everyone appreciated their efforts!

The North American’s will be held in Vancouver in September, the site of the 2017 World’s. It promises to be a great event with several European teams coming over to test the waters. The official site is  and you can find lots of shots from the British Open and Europeans as well as notices for the NA’s.

I’ve been racing 6 meters for five years now and race everything from Vipers to large high performance boats. The 6′s are amazingly cool to sail because whether you are in a modern or classic, there is plenty to do in these highly tweaky boats! If you get a chance, go for a sail on a tuned up classic or modern, you will be impressed!

The British Open winning team of US 83 Llanoria consisted of Eric ‘Jumbo’ Jespersen (helm), Chris ‘Snapper’ Winnard (Main/Tactics), Rodger ‘Nudger’ Phillips (Genoa/Spin), Peter ‘Noddie’ Hoffman (owner/ cockpit) and last but not least, Ross ‘Bubbles’ Jespersen on bow. We had a fantastic time in Falmouth and local comedy legend Jethro will be handing out the Snappie awards later this year in front of the Oggy Oggy Pasty Shop with musical guests, The Wurzels. Photos – credit Dana E Olsen.

-Chris ‘Snapper’ Winnard

 

July 25th, 2014

Article Separator

No one saw this coming, did they?

 

July 25th, 2014

Article Separator

SA’er “US772″ checks in (with some editing help) from the Landsailing Worlds sailed last week in the heart of the Nevada desert in Smith Creek.  More photos from Walter Carrels here, and you can add your own report or ask the new Champ questions in the thread.

Screen Shot 2014-07-25 at 12.21.44 PMI just got back from the event – about a 16-hour haul for me from Montana.  I’m an avid iceboater up here, and I get to land sail a few times a year at the America’s Landsailing Cup and the HolyGale, both in Nevada.   A new class called the 5.6 International Mini has emerged recently; catching on like wildfire all over the world.  I decided to join the fray, and I’ve been preparing for Worlds for a while now.  The Mini class is a brilliant class with only 3 rules: 1) 4.8×8 inch tires or the equivalent in size; 2) a round mast section; and 3) the boat must fit inside a 5.6-meter long rope that wraps around the wheels as they touch the ground. This very open rule means unlimited sail size and almost complete freedom in design. So if you’re a big or little person, you still have a chance.

I build all my equipment from scratch, and with my experience from bigger dirt boats, I decided to take a different approach to the design that what was previously out there. I made mine more like a bigger Class 3 dirtboat  than a stick framed mini, concentrating on aerodynamics and function rather than the typical lightweight approach.  My mini weighs twice as much as most; about 150 lbs.  My sheeting system is a winch and drum system, and I used 1/8” spectra and, rather than the typical Harken stuff, I made my own blocks with the rollers off a sliding glass door. My traveler is also a homegrown device that allows you to pull it to weather; I made it with skateboard bearings from the local skate shop.

The framework of the boat started with a conduit bender I bought at Home Depot. The tubing bender’s radius set the tone for the whole boat and the size of round tubing I could use. The fuselage is also based off of the front wheel. I decided to go very aero on the front wheel, which is  buried inside the fuselage. Everything gets complicated when you do that. After the framework comes the aluminum sheeting.

156581306.vEwe5lsx.wc14mon-2014070For the sail package, I worked with Bruce Peterson at Sailworks. I had him do a few tweaks on the normal sail designs to suit my needs.  I completed the mini last fall, converting it to an iceboat and sailing it for hundreds of miles and many many hours on hard water to get some practice for the event. I broke the boat 4 times prior to the Worlds, believing it’s good to sail hard and find the weak spots.  A few weeks before the event, I made a few more changes that really paid off for the conditions at the Smith Creek.

The Minis race first two-and-a-half days at Worlds. The rest of the classes race the remaining days. The weather was awful! 95 to 100 degrees no wind for the first day. I’ve been racing dirtboats since 1980 and sometimes I still get sick to my stomach pre-race, and this was the most stressful racing I’ve ever done. I was going up against the European and prior World Champion, and there were about a half dozen others that would be really tough to beat.  Most, if not all their boats, are a factory boat or a partial factory boat that I’m assuming are sponsored or partially sponsored by the manufacturer. In fact, the French get paid by their government if they win or place at a World Championship!  The sport is very popular in Europe compared to the US. There are even landsailing schools in France. They are usually dominate competitions. Fortunately, I have been watching those guys on the internet over the years so I knew what to expect.

Day One: 
Not much wind but plenty of heat. We sat around from 10 am to about 7pm waiting for wind and listening to briefing after briefing every hour or so. It was tough to be filled with pre-race nerves while staving off dehydration. I got a ripping headache from the heat and felt lethargic most of the afternoon. They started one race which I led most of the way around, only to turn about to find 3 Euros pushing like jackrabbits toward the next mark while I’m trying to sail. The race was black flagged due to lack of wind. Racing cancelled at 7pm, and of course, the wind arrives at 7:10.

Day Two:

10 am race briefing. I feel much better this morning. My brother, Scott, is a cyclist, and he’s helping me stay healthy by pumping me full of all kinds of fluids and go-fast cycling supplements throughout the day. I win the first race, but it’s black flagged due to the three quarters of the fleet not being able to sail. In the second race, I come in  just behind the former World Champion from Germany. In the third race, three boats are over early when I hit the line at speed on the right side of the course. I stay in third but end up in first due to others’ mistakes. In the next race, the wind one-eighties, so the coarse is reversed. It’s a short coarse with 4 to 5 marks wrapped around camp so spectators can view easily. I’m used to a windward leeward iceboat type coarse, but my boat, even tough it’s heavy, does very well on the short circuit. I’ve got the sail set up for low end performance, and I do most of my passing going downwind. The lighter the wind the better I do.

You can see defeat in the eyes of a few that were expected to be favorites. Just after midday a thunderstorm is brewing in the distance. We see the dust from afar coming our way. I tip my boat over to secure it and other follow suit. The wind and dust hit and I can only see about 4 feet in front of me. We lay on our sails getting pelted by the lake bed getting ripped off itself. It feels like hail, and lasts about 40 minutes. Sven the German World champion gets off his sail after the storm and can’t find his boat. It got loose with no mast or sail and blew down the dry lake 2 miles away.  The gps revealed a top speed of 32 miles per hour with no rig.

With the dust came rain, which caked mud clods onto everything. It took a while to get things cleaner again, and since the storm sucked all the wind away with it, we’ve got time. The next race I am in second following the leader about 3 feet behind, and we’re both clearly tired from the heat.   He starts rounding one of the marks the wrong way, and I follow until just before the mark I get yelled at by a French pilot bearing down on me so we don’t collide head on around the mark. Collision averted, I round properly only to be fouled by the previous leader. I am rattled and sail the wrong way again. At the last second, I looked over my shoulder to see 3 boats sail the proper course so I quickly jibe down to the mark in hot pursuit. In the end I clawed back a few spots after my stupidity.  2 more races and 3 more black flagged races later I’m leading the mini class by one point!  That night I collect 1 daily first award and another award for leading the class for the first day. I’m stoked and surprised at my success, to say the least!

Screen Shot 2014-07-25 at 12.22.19 PMDay Three:

I’m even more nervous than before since I’m now in the lead, and I have a huge target on my back. The 2-minute sailing start could easily do you in, as 40 plus boats are wizzing around at 25 miles per hour jockeying for the windward pin at speed. One of the US guys get t-boned in the prestart. The French boats front wheel ends up in the Americans lap, badly cutting his knee with the front fork. Most of the French are really getting good at their starts, while I am not. I hold back a bit so as not to foul anyone or get in a wreck, of which there are plenty. I find the windward pin area is pretty clogged up. I choose the middle. I find I can claw my way back to the top if there are enough laps with in the 10 minute timed race. We race for 10 minutes who ever is in the lead after 10 minute wins. That usually translates into 3 to 4 laps. The first races goes well for me, and I come in second. In another race, I’m way ahead in the lead, only to sail into a hole and watch the fleet go around me on the left.  The race is eventually black flagged due to lack of wind. One more black flagged race. In the next race I get a bad start and end up in fifth place, and adding up numbers from the placements the night before, I think I’m still in first. The second place boat the day before is mid fleet. The third place guy yesterday is now second, and my biggest threat.

Screen Shot 2014-07-25 at 12.22.53 PMThe cut off is 1 pm, and at 12:30, I just want the time to run out.  The wind doesn’t, and I’m in third place when the next race is abandoned.  As I’m pushing back to the camp, I throw my helmet sky-high, knowing I’m the World Champ.  The Race Committee doesn’t agree, and they decide to hold a race at 1:06 PM. “Someone shoot me with a gun,” I think to myself, feeling screwed over.  I’m in tenth shortly after the new final race starts, and I hope I can pass enough boats.  I pass four before the weather mark and turn downwind.  The wind dies, the race is black-flagged, and I become the  2014 5.6 International Mini  World Champion!

Later that week I raced in class 2 and ended up in fourth place, while my nephew Will raced class 3 and helped the USA get the team medals for that class. A huge thanks to FISLY and NALSA for organizing an awesome event, and a bigger thanks to my family who kept me healthy during the racing.

-John Eisenlohr, US772

 

July 25th, 2014

Article Separator

Gerd-Jan in mast

Fresh from their trouncing of Teams SCA and Campos during last weekend’s little Round the Canaries race comes this shot of Brunel bowman Gerd-Jan Poortman standing on Brunel’s forestay.  ”Was he up there fixing or inspecting?”, we asked.  ”Nope – that pose was on his bucket list.”

While Bouwe and the Brunel team continue to do a good job building fans, we’re surprised that the Alvimedica and Abu Dhabi teams seemed to have dropped off the face of the Earth after their recent transatlantic ‘non-race’, without a single update since about the 19th.  Anyone know more?  Hit the VOR thread.  Sander Van Der Borch photo, and here’s the best cover we’ve found of the Johnny Cash classic that gave this piece its title – or at least the best looking!

 

July 25th, 2014

Article Separator

Big Pimpin’

Screen Shot 2014-07-25 at 2.24.00 PMRather than get into protracted trademark litigation with some asshat in an entirely unrelated business, our pals and longtime advertisers at YellowBrick have just announced a name change, and we’re passing it along so that everyone knows where to find the most reliable offshore tracker in the sport.  From now on, they’ll be known as YB Tracking, and you can find them at www.ybtracking.com.  We’re also stoked to learn that more and more events will be offering free mobile tracking as well, solving the only gripe we have about the YB program. Here’s more from Nick @ YB:

Aside from our name, absolutely nothing else is affected. Our staff, products and service delivery remain unchanged and our business will continue as normal. Your primary contact for any assistance should be support@ybtracking.com.  Thank you for your continued support, and we look forward to serving your next race, event or expedition as YB Tracking.

 

July 25th, 2014

Article Separator

gp slings

The Jim Donovan-designed GP 26 hull #6 gets ready for action in Connecticut. More pics of the boat, Donovan and his crazy bird are here.

 

July 25th, 2014

ropeye banner 3 25

predict wind banner ad

http://www.camet.com/

rbs banner ad

http://www.westmarine.com/timers/ronstan--clearstart-sailing-watch-black-red--15213648?cm_mmc=DS-_-Sailinganarchy-_-RonstanWatch-_-160x160Blue/

ullman banner 7 24

anchor new ad

toro 34 banner ad

uk ad 4 3

cci banner ad

Gunboat 60 sailing in Annapolis, MD.

FSS_SA

fisheries side ad 7 22

http://www.motivetrimarans.com/

yellow banner

gmt banner ad

pyi banner ad

http://www.shaw650.com/

karver ad 1 14

schwab tall banner ad

http://www.dryuv.com

http://www.crowleys.com/

west marine 160 x 250 ad 6 10

sail fast banner ad 6 10

sound ad 4 23

http://www.mauriprosailing.com/

weta banner 2 9

ner 2

BBY_SA

http://www.lymanmorse.com

torqeedo small ad

farr 280 banner ad

http://www.quantumsails.com/

c c 30 banner 6 17

landfall generic.

mx ad

seascape banner