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Phil Sharp (GBR) and crew (Julien Pulve FR, Pablo Santurde ESP, Sam Matson GBR) are currently leading the Sevenstar Round Britain and Ireland race with a 30 mile advantage. The fourth Class 40 Championship race for Phil ahead of November’s solo grand slam the Route du Rhum from St Malo to Guadeloupe.

For the past two editions the weather has been so rough that the race organisers (Royal Ocean Racing Club) reversed the route to protect the fleet from a potential battering. As an official World Speed Sailing Record route this 1,800nm circumnavigation offers more than a race win for the Class 40s who are hungry to set a new World Record with a chance to take overall line honours.

Of the 29 boats that started on Sunday, there have been 6 retirements and with the worst of the weather yet to come, the podium is far from certain. The front runners are currently racing in near gale conditions with winds expected to develop all the way up to the Shetland Islands. Phil Sharp, skipper of Imerys Clean Energy reports from the boat:

“Conditions are getting quite crazy out here…

“The wind is around 30 knots now and increasing slowly as we pelt towards a front in the low pressure. We just had a sustained surf of 22 knots which lasted a good 30 seconds with the boat absolutely screaming. This is really the limit for the spinnaker, and we will probably change down soon to the Code 5 furling sail if it gets any winder.”

It took less than 20 hours to sail the length of Ireland:

Soon after midnight, approximately half-way up Ireland, team Imerys took control of the fleet and continued to extend their lead. With strong winds comes risk of boat damage. At 3am Phor-ty (then 3rd) crewed by round the world sailor Mike Golding and Route du Rhum competitor Sam Goodchild headed for land to make a ‘small rudder repair’, eventually retiring, whilst at dawn Corum too encountered problems stopping momentarily mid-race.

“It was a great feeling late yesterday to take the lead, but sorry to hear that Phor-ty has had to stop earlier today, we were enjoying the battle!

“In the meantime we have some breathing space, but we are all too aware of how many twists and challenges could lie ahead, so we will continue to race hard and hopefully continue the lead margin just in case we too face problems aboard.” Phil continued.

 

August 15th, 2018

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Big Pimpin’

Since its foundation in Newport Beach, California in 1967 Ullman Sails has always gone about its business in a slightly different way, blending core knowledge with local talent to inspire a global network.

It is a glowing testament to the vision of Dave Ullman that the sailmaking company he founded over 50 years ago continues to thrive and succeed with pretty much the same structure he created. Comparisons with the laidback, chilled-out west coast vibe of the time would be entirely accurate. This is an organisation that is driven by an all-consuming passion for sailing, one that nurtures talent, takes great pride in its successes and learns from its occasional failures too.

The current management has kept Dave’s organic structure because it’s responsive, proactive and delivers pathways to innovation, so Ullman Sails is still about competing, creating, sharing knowledge, learning, improving – and having fun – as a global community of sailmakers.

‘Ullman Sails is essentially different,’ explains head of design Bruce Hollis. ‘It’s an amalgamation of very skilled independent sailmakers who aren’t always operating big lofts, but who have developed skills in their particular niche and sail at a really good level. They love the spontaneity, the creative freedom and responsibility our structure gives them.

‘We use a central design office to provide a skilled and knowledgeable point through which these lofts can interact. This connects the ideas and experience of a very large group of hands-on sailmakers to form a giant organic sail design brain. The range of conditions and customer expectations that this covers is amazing, and also brings together skills that inform the group across what a club racer in a dinghy might want, or a cruising multihull in Singapore, an iceboat racer in Russia or a skiff sailor in Europe.

Read on.

 

August 15th, 2018

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We are never not amazed at the design direction the top Mini’s…

Jörg Riechers winner has crossed the finish line of the second stage of the 7th edition of Les Sables – The Azores – Les Sables. The skipper of Lilienthal, who swallowed the 1,270 mile course between Horta and Port Olona in 5 days 6:51 p.m. minutes and 23 seconds at an average speed of 9.15 knots, printed a furious pace from beginning to end and finally made the difference.

Photo Christophe Breschi.

 

August 14th, 2018

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A talented small boat sailor throughout his early years winning several championships, Matt Day was part of the inaugural intake of the CYCA Youth Sailing Academy in 1993 and represented the club in the first youth academy team the CYCA sent to participate in the Youth Match Racing World Championship in New Zealand and remained part of the team for the following three years with much success.

Matt went on to sail with many CYCA members both in Australia and overseas to great success, including Neil Whiston on Fruit Machine, Richard Perini on Corinthian and Evolution, Marcus Blackmore’s Hooligan and with Guido Belgiorno-Nettis on Transfusion, as well as for many years as part of the Vanguard crew with Dick Cawse.

He was also part of the CYCA Race Management Team which played a pivotal role in staging the 2000 Olympic Regatta on Sydney Harbour. Our deepest sympathy is extended to Matt’s family, particularly his daughter Jade, as well as his close friends of which he had many.

With sailing friendships of more than thirty years, Matt was a great mate to all who sailed with him; he will be sadly missed.

A funeral service will be held at 11am on Monday 20 August at St. Luke’s Anglican Church, 17 Burton Street, Concord, followed by a celebration of Matt’s life at the CYCA 1pm to 4pm.

August 14th, 2018

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This is the answer to that.

 

August 14th, 2018

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Argo is led by American Jason Carroll who started his career in 2007 in Melges 32. With two titles of world champion in the category. But also, two American championship titles and the European championship still in Melges32. The team also won the 2013 North American Viper Championship. Since 2014, we have seen the GC32 team on the GC32 Racing Tour.

 Not to mention all the class wins, see scratch on the races in the Caribbean on the Gunboat 62 Elvis. 

 A new category will be added to Jason Carroll’s team palette, with a MOD70. Indeed, since early August, the former Musamdam Oman Sail is put in the colors of the American team.

 The trimaran always carries the Oman Sail identifications.  The program communicated by the ARGO Team is a ferry to Newport, then the Carribean 600, the crossing to the Pacific to continue with the Cabo Race 2019 and the Transpac next summer.”

Article translated from the french site www.ultimboat.com

 

August 14th, 2018

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The Environment

Northern California’s (NoCal – ed) Sacramento and San Joaquin Delta are supposed to be an oasis for fish, waterfowl, and recreational boating, but state officials say there’s now a growing environmental and navigational danger: hundreds of abandoned boats with a costly clean-up price tag.

Steve Hampton with California Department of Fish & Wildlife said that there are 250 known vessels littering the Delta, but there could be many more below water. “Some of them are floating, some of them are sunk, some of them are partially sunk,” he told KOVR-TV.

“Responding to abandoned and derelict vessels is about 20% of our responses,” Hampton said. While recreational boats are the bulk of the debris field, the larger, commercial vessels pose the biggest risk. “They can leak oil, they have other hazardous materials on them,” Hampton said.

“It’s a shock,” said Steve Mayo, a coach with the River City Rowing Club, referring to when their vessels hit debris. “Our boats are low to the water, so when they hit it can be really dangerous for the kids too.”

Read on.

 

August 14th, 2018

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Not that there has been an outcry for it, but here is a little update on the boat. First, I wanted to tell you how the new North Sails go, and go they indeed do. We are fast, the sails look quite good. There is one odd wrinkle in the main, but often ugly is fast… We have speed and height, and our class kite is just super, super quick. Honestly, really love the sails. A bit spendy, but so far they seem to justify the cost.

Everything about the North experience has been top shelf, in no small part thanks to Brian Janney. And you know me, if it sucked or there was something I didn’t like, I’d sure as hell bitch about it.

So there is one sail that we had not had a chance to use, and that is the new Code Zero. Built out of North’s proprietary laminate, it is arguably one of the best sails I’ve ever seen. These guys hit what I wanted this sail to be right on the head. Unfortunately I don’t yet have any pictures, but we got to fly it on a bay race and it was magic, right until it sheared the Chinese stainless steel tack line block attachment right off the boat!

We are quite sold on this zero so we are rigging a better way to use it easier and more often (hint: furler). Again, the boys at SD Boatworks are handling the rigging and implementation. They had to mill a new Delrin cap, and we love this nice touch they added to it. we are super excited to get this underway and for sure will get you more detailed photos and a report of how we like it! – ed.

 

August 13th, 2018

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Found on the River Wyre just by Skippool Creek in Lancashire, Northwest of UK. But then this beauty is only 300 meters away in the creek (Opposite David Moss wooden boatbuilders!)

 

August 13th, 2018

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Busy times for the team at the International Maxi Association supporting all the events that now include Maxi starts, like the Rolex Capri Sailing Week, the 151 Miglia and the Rolex Giraglia 2018 inshore races at Saint Tropez, as well of course as the classic offshore to Genoa…

Each of these events has its management structure and it is not as if the IMA aims to be part of that – the IMA just tries to help the event organisers to reach out to Maxi owners as well as to be available to Maxi owners and their representatives as a link to individual event organisations. Technical support, like helping with the text of NoRs and Sailing Instructions, is given and often appreciated as Maxi sailing is complex, no two boats are the same and the range of diversity is huge, which is reflected in the rules of the IMA and its associated classes as well as in the variety of rating systems and class rule peculiarities that we see in Maxi racing.

It is no wonder Maxi sailing is a bit of a rule-maze with boats varying in size from 18.29m hull length… to no upper limit. Some are pure racers, some pure cruising yachts, and many are aiming somewhere in between these two. In the IMA rule these are respectfully referred to as Racer Cruisers but this surely includes yachts that would more aptly be described as Cruiser Racer… or even Cruiser.

In practice we see boats up to 200ft joining events, yachts by their sheer size complex in almost every aspect of running and sailing them, let alone racing them. As maxi racing only fills part of the day the social side is never far away. From an ice bucket with some bottles of bubbly to a glitzy party with a seated dinner for 1,000 people, live entertainment, light shows, large-screen videos and fireworks, it has all got to be planned and organised. Read on.

 

August 13th, 2018

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